fabrica

recognition
RECOGNITION

Recognition, winner of IK Prize 2016 for digital innovation, is an artificial intelligence program that compares up-to-the-minute photojournalism with British art from the Tate collection. Over three months from 2 September to 27 November, Recognition will create an ever-expanding virtual gallery: a time capsule of the world represented in diverse types of images, past and present.A display at Tate Britain accompanies the online project offering visitors the chance to interrupt the machine’s selection process. The results of this experiment – to see if an artificial intelligence can learn from the many personal responses humans have when looking at images – will be presented on this site at the end of the project.Recognition is a project by Fabrica for Tate; in partnership with Microsoft, content provider Reuters, artificial intelligence algorithm by Jolibrain.

Breakfast

Tides
This Flip-Discs artwork visualizes the real-time ebb-and-flow of the tides on a specific coast somewhere in the world. The speed, direction, and swell height are all represented in how the piece moves. As one walks up to the piece, their image is reflected back. The contrast of their image changes based on the state of the current tide.

Fito Segrera

The form of becoming
In this abstract system, each intelligent agent is embodied as a motor, the states in its environment is represented as an angular range of rotation and the actions as one of two directions in which each agent can move a linear actuator. Each linear system holds a segment of a long black string, this translates as a point in the represented line. Once the system runs, each agent learns, from informational equivalents of pain and pleasure, to move towards the highest values within its environment, this means ultimately to displace its position from point A to B. In order for an agent to learn, it needs time, generations of exploration, each agent will get punished for bad decisions and rewarded for appropriate ones. Every time a learning generation is finished, a light will blink for that particular agent, indicating the end of a cycle and the achievement of new knowledge; the agent becomes more intelligent. Once all agents learned to be and stay in point B, the system, as a collective, has successfully mutated into a stable, balanced, symmetric and silent form; a straight line. Finally, after a few seconds, the sculpture forgets, all agents are rebooted and the cycle of creation, chaos and order restarts, this time with a totally different and unique behavior.

Cao Yuxi

Dimensional Sampling
Dimensional Sampling (Series) is a digital contemporary art project started by Cao Yuxi Studio in 2019. The core concept of the project is based on the digital totem of the era totem represented by the QR code image style, and further re-examine the digital age of the new era. This AudioVisual version installation is collaborative project that created with Hong Kong based sound artist Lawrence Lau.

BarabásiLab

Hidden Patterns
The co-citation network for Nature: more than 88,000 papers published by the journal since 1900 are each represented by a dot, coloured by discipline. Papers are linked if another scientific paper (of those indexed in the Web of Science) cites both; the dot size reflects the number of these co-citation links.
Invisible, hidden connections and constantly repeating patterns within nature, society, language, and culture can not only be explored but also made visible. Barabási’s network approach promises to deliver a comprehensive, universal method that will illuminate many phenomena with scientific precision.

Ray McClure and Casey McGonagle

Visual Voice Virtual Reality
VVVR (Visual Voice Virtual Reality) is a voice controlled tool for self exploration and well being. It combines virtual reality and audio effects to temporarily free the mind from language and cultivate awareness of the present moment. In VVVR two people sit across from one another and are represented in the virtual space with corresponding avatars. When either person makes sound it is translated into glowing geometry that flows from their mouth. The vocal audio is harmonically processed and fed back through the headphones.

Karlheinz Stockhausen

SONNTAG aus LICHT

Sonntag aus Licht takes as its subject our solar system and the relationships of all the planets that orbit the sun. In this opera, the earth and life on it is represented as the result of the union of light and water. These two elements are presented in the first scene, and the rest of the opera celebrates the evolution of life, of plants, animals, humans, and above all this the planets, moons, and heavenly constellations. The opera has a pronounced ritualistic and meditative character, with very little that can be described as dramatic action.

Martin Hesselmeier and Andreas Muxel

The weight of light
Light, as we usually interpret it, is an element without mass and gravity. For “the weight of light” a physics engine simulates the kinetic forces of a moving object. This mass is projected on a wave shaped structure in virtual space. The moving object is represented as a light particle in physical space. Gravity, mass, density and friction affect velocity and acceleration of these light particles. As the particles movement is based on a simulation, it does not have to adhere to the physical realities we know from everyday life. Therefore the installation goes beyond expected behaviour. Thus the matter of light traverses a reinterpretation of our known reality.

Jorinder Voigt

Jorinde Voigt is a contemporary German artist. Known for her coded drawing installations which resemble algorithms or sound waves, Voigt’s background in music and philosophical studies established her ongoing interest in probing scientific mapping processes. Throughout an inventive and playful drawing practice, her work visualizes thoughts and infinite spaces while examining the way in which information is represented visually.

Godfried Toussaint

The Geometry of Musical Rhythm: What Makes a “Good” Rhythm Good? ” is a book on the mathematics of rhythms and drum beats. It was written by Godfried Toussaint, in order to study rhythms mathematically, Toussaint abstracts away many of their features that are important musically, involving the sounds or strengths of the individual beats, the phasing of the beats, hierarchically-structured rhythms, or the possibility of music that changes from one rhythm to another. The information that remains describes the beats of each bar (an evenly-spaced cyclic sequence of times) as being either on-beats (times at which a beat is emphasized in the musical performance) or off-beats (times at which it is skipped or performed only weakly). This can be represented combinatorially as a necklace, an equivalence class of binary sequences under rotations, with true binary values representing on-beats and false representing off-beats.

imagen: Ethan-Hein-blog

Jessica Eaton

but does it float
The Montreal-based artist has been working in the arcane reaches of analog photography for over 14 years. Through obsessive experimentation, she has developed a method entirely her own, combining additive colour theory and what she calls “a really bastardized version of Ansel Adam’s zone system.” Eaton’s relentless inventiveness and exacting practice have made her one of the most successful Canadian artist-photographers working today. She’s represented by galleries in Montreal, LA, and New York, where she exhibits her work by turns on a bi-annual basis. Viewers and collectors are drawn to the unique tensions in Eaton’s work: the austere minimalism coupled with her daring colors; the hyper-abstraction undercut by a current of playfulness; the defiant impenetrability softened by an aura of warmth.

Ayodamola Okunseinde

TechnoShamanism
I reclaim spaces for underrepresented communities with the use of technology, ritual and the speculative. Whether it be a citizen “sousveillance” suit to monitor police activity, a Techno-Shamanistic religion that virtually renders ritual, or archeological artifacts from future African cultures, I find it imperative to work collaboratively with other artists and local communities.
Ayodamola Tanimowo Okunseinde (ayo) is a Nigerian-American artist, designer, and time-traveler living and working in New York. He studied Visual Arts and Philosophy at Rutgers the State University of New Jersey where he earned his B.A.

RICHARD BURBRIDGE

Ричард Барбридж
リチャードバーブリッジ
리처드 버 브리지
ريتشارد بيربريدج
masks

Richard Burbridge, an influential British fashion photographer. Unfortunately any biographical info on him was impossible to find, but guessing by some of his early work, he has been a staple of the fashion industry for some time now. He is an absolute genius with lighting, and whether it’s commercial or editorial, we love all of his work. Richard Burbridge was part of 90s fashion bible i-D, and shot some of my favourite covers for the magazine from 1999 to mid-2000s, has also brought his hyper technical lighting and perfectionism to The New York Times T Magazine, V Magazine and Italian Vogue. He is represented by Art + Commerce.

IANNIS XENAKIS

PITHOPRAKTA
During the 1950s and early 1960s‚ Iannis Xenakis represented an alternative avant­garde‚ with a radical approach to form and texture that rejected the serial mechanics of Boulez and Stockhausen‚ and involved a uniquely intense interpretation of ideas about probability and randomness. A world away from John Cage’s laid­back experiments[…] The two short orchestral works‚ Metastasis and Pithoprakta‚ are undoubtedly far more austere‚ more primitive in their overall effect‚ than the exuberant‚ hyperactive Eonta‚ whose ferociously demanding writing for piano and five brass players pulsates with the kind of creative energy that the orchestral pieces seek to suppress.

alexander mcqueen

الكسندر ماكوين
亚历山大·麦昆
알렉산더 맥퀸
אלכסנדר מקווין
アレキサンダーマックイーン
Александра Маккуина
Android Couture

Presented on the cusp of the new millennium, Alexander McQueen’s Autumn/Winter 1999 collection for famed French fashion house Givenchy captured the new fascination with personalized digital technology in popular culture. At the culmination of the show, two models appeared outfitted in molded Perspex bodices studded with flashing LED lights and glowing leggings patterned like computer chips. The creation of a digital aesthetic and its intimate application to the body—an android-like amalgamation of the physical and digital—anticipated the “wearables” trend and the formation of the digital self. Known for his exquisite tailoring, meticulous detailing, and ambitious collections, McQueen also represented one of the remaining visionaries of haute couture extravagance.

DOMINIQUE PETRIN

Pazzazz
Dominique Pétrin brings the image to its highest degree of saturation and develops an intense dialogue between images, their support, and their configuration. Pazzazz is a Greco-Roman fresco that recalls the music-hall of the 70s. Excess, wealth, and decadence are represented in an ornamental style that is almost threatening. Between dreams and apparitions, the optical illusion is lost in a maze of pleasure and abuse, enjoyment and intoxication.

LEYLA CARDENAS

Periplo (detail)
Based in Bogotá and represented there by Casas Riegner, Leyla Cardenas engages with the remnants and artifacts of destruction, the seen and unseen, the visible and invisible. Working with found object and images from archives, often her process mirrors that of an archeologist since she procures fragments such as walls, ceilings and floors to produce her work.

Oh Seung Yul

The Ability to Blow Themselves Up
Born in Korea in 1981, Seung Yul Oh moved to New Zealand in 1997 and graduated from Elam School of Fine Arts at the University of Auckland in 2005. He has exhibited widely in New Zealand and Korea. In 2013 he was recipient of the SEMA Nanji Residency in Seoul and in 2011 was recipient of the Harriet Friedlander New York Residency, supported by the Arts Foundation of New Zealand. His work is represented in the collections of the Auckland Art Gallery; The Museum of New Zealand – Te Papa Tongarewa in Wellington; and the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne. He lives and works in Auckland and Seoul.

Rosalie Yu

Embrace in Progress
Embrace in Progress explores conflicted feelings of shared intimacy. It is inspired by personal and cultural experiences where human contact is not commonly practiced in social interaction. The daunting and unfamiliar proximity of being captured in someone’s arms distorts one’s sense of time. The project was inspired by slit-scan photography and uses depth sensors to capture a series of intimate embraces. These 3D printed pieces recreate the act of embracing and are represented in a static form by the flow of movement twisted because of time.

Alexis Christodoulou

From a lifelong fascination of digital worlds and 3D graphics from playing video games a boy, Alexis became frustrated with the lack of modern aesthetics represented therein. The images he creates are a simple extension of this desire to see fantastic spaces come to life that echo a more modern and clean aesthetic.

Florian Graf

Chamber Music
Florian Graf’s work questions the relationship between people and architecture and the psychological and emotional influence it has on us. He interrogates the visible and invisible systems by which our daily life is structured or investigates how intimate and collective thought are represented or simultaneously affected by the built realm.

Jeff Carter

Construction N
Often occupying both physical and temporal space, my sculpture has always incorporated both conventional and experimental media, including woodcarving, metalworking, installation, kinetics, microelectronics and video. While it tends to be visually diverse, the friction between object and memory has been at the conceptual core of my sculptural practice since 1994. The images, objects and narratives of a particular place or experience undergo distortions each time they are represented, and it is these forms of abstraction I explore in my sculpture.
Earlier bodies of work have utilized the physical residue of my traveling – the souvenirs, postcards, snapshots and videotapes – as central elements of the sculpture, forcing them to reveal their own inadequacy, disengagement or transformation, to subvert the nostalgic ideal, or to disrupt the usual implications of value and validation in a cultural artifact. In later works I utilize the physicality of scale, motion, and orientation to extend and challenge the conventional representation of landscape. These pieces define specific places as indefinite spatial constructs that complicate the certainty of “being there,” and are part of a larger attempt to relate a fragmented travel narrative through architecture, landscapes and souvenirs.
I have been using IKEA products as raw material for several years, and continue to be interested in extracting conceptual value from it. I am currently exploring the relationship between the Modern avant-garde and contemporary consumer design culture. In my recent work, I attempt to articulate various points of connection and rupture between IKEA and the Bauhaus by constructing scale models of demolished or unrealized buildings by Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius using “hacked” IKEA products such as tables, bookshelves and flooring.

MICHAEL GUIDETTI

Bounce Room 1

“The digital projection represented as three red, green, and blue spherical lights; and the painted environment as five flat planes receding in perspective. That’s about as far as I could boil them down to. Separately they are elementary and flat, but when they come together, the simulated light and physics of the spheres bouncing around in the space becomes illusionistic.” Michael Guidetti

ANTTI LOVAG

Palais Bulles

Bulles was commissioned by a wealthy French businessman, a great admirer of the Hungarian architect. In this first time, the “bubbles house” was used as a beach house, a family holiday in front of the blue of the Mediterranean. The second owner of Palais Bulles was the famous French fashion designer Pierre Cardin. From 1991, Cardin spent his holidays there and organized extraordinary parties.  Palais Bulles represented, for the fashion designer, the female body. Everything, he said, from floor to ceiling, from external to internal space, has spherical shapes. The entire space is invaded by the sensuality of round shapes.

video