Fabrice le Nezet

Elasticity
With an urge to constantly explore the intersection between architecture, fashion, and product design, london-based artist Fabrice le Nezet has created ‘Elasticity.’ the work materializes the idea of tension by making the notion of weight and stretch palpable through the use of four massive and abstract metal structures. These components run perpendicularly across the long edges of rectangular voids in the ceiling. by presenting this normal condition, several of the wires bend to support large prisms of concrete that provide a feeling of force and motion. as they drop down to occupy spaces below, movement is emphasized by their strategic orientation below clerestory windows shining light onto the forms. As observers move around the constructs, a contrast is created between the real properties of the materials and the way they are perceived.

Azuma Makoto

Encapsulated environmental system: Paludarium YASUTOSHI
This machine is fully equipped with a mist machine as if wrapping plants in a fog from both sides and drip feed-water system which can be activated depending on the situation in order to maintain the condition of a plant and control inside temperature and humidity. Also the cylindrical shape can fully capture the natural light by 365°angles from glasses, and it can correspond to plant growth by having the series’ largest scale of height. Fans on the ceiling play a role of wind, and a plant can listen music from the waterproofed speakers. The machine takes in essential elements – rain, wind, light and sound – by artificial means and completes a small world where its ecological cycle is condensed. It enables us to admire the beauty of the plants by not being affected by external environment.

Quadrature

Supraspectives
In the process of creating Supraspectives, the artist duo Quadrature has gathered the data of 590 (recent & former) spy satellites, whose trajectory the installation follows. A third of them can be considered space trash, as they are obsolete or damaged, but still, they continue overflying us. The installation calculates the paths of all those satellites in real time and speculatively reconstructs the view they are capturing, offering artistically intervened images of what the satellites could be observing. Mainly satellites passing near the exhibition venue are selected, combined with other specially interesting or suggestive satellite images. Additionally, a specifically built motorized antenna on the roof connects live with the satellites overflying Tabakalera, transforming their real radio signals into sound. Everytime the installation connects with a satellite, the screen shows the data relative to it, such as country of origin or year of launch.

Behin Ha

TOGETHER APART BILLUND
Together Apart Billund consists of 375 coated mesh fabric ribbons stretched between the roofline of the Billund community building and the ground. Connected to the ground along an undulating line that curves in on itself, the ribbons create a series of cellular spaces. While the surface generated by the ribbons separates the individual spaces, its porosity provides visual interconnectivity between them. With the top and bottom anchoring patterns aligned symmetrically to the building facade, the installation is situated to have an axial relationship with surrounding buildings. The interplay between the linear top anchor positions and curved ground anchor pattern gives rise to differentiated and complex conditions of visual overlap, density, and transparency. The bright orange color of the installation creates a focal point and invites curious passers-by to interact with the work.

tangible media group

transdock
Ken Nakagaki, Yingda (Roger) Liu, Chloe Nelson-Arzuaga, and Hiroshi Ishii
TRANS-DOCK is a docking system for pin-based shape displays that expand their interaction capabilities for both the output and input. By simply interchanging the transducer modules, composed of passive mechanical structures, to be docked on a shape display, users can selectively switch between different configurations including display sizes, resolutions, and even motion modalities such as rotation, bending, and inflation.
In our paper accepted to TEI 2020, we introduce a design space consisting of several mechanical elements and enabled interaction capabilities. Our proof-of-concept prototype explores the development of the docking system based on our previously developed 10 x 5 shape display, inFORCE. A number of transducer examples are shown to demonstrate the range of interactivity and application space achieved with the approach of TRANS-DOCK.

Akane Moriyama + Jasper Carlsen

Reflected Roof
A series of fans gently shape the textile into a sequence of changing forms that although programmed will never exactly repeat. The daylight, cast from above, falls onto and through the fabric and as it’s angle changes throughout the day creates ever changes in colour, shadow and reflection.

Quadrature

Positions of the Unknown
At the very beginning of space exploration the infrastructure to monitor the whole sky was not yet developed. So in order to find out whether foreign countries launched objects, the US government started to train citizens to observe and detect possible artificial satellites. Scattered over the allied world, these amateur scientists played a crucial part in keeping track of all men-made technology orbiting earth, until “Operation Moonwatch” was discontinued in 1975 […] “Positions of the Unknown” locates the current whereabouts of these mysterious objects by simply pointing at them as they revolve around Earth. Missing the legal proof, those unidentified artefacts remain entities of pure speculation, secret companions of us and our planet. Even so they have been sighted several times and their ubiquitous presence is therefore somehow validated, they linger in a state between existence and non-existence. Quadrature’s 52 small machines constantly follow their paths and serve as silent witnesses of the unknown.

NPS TCHOBAN VOSS

nhow hotel berlin
Extreme cantilever alert! A four-storey block with a mirrored underside juts out from the top of a Berlin hotel, 25 metres above the ground (photos by Roland Halbe). The huge cantilever comprises the upper floors of the eleven-storey NHow Hotel, which was designed by German architects NPS Tchoban Voss. The end of the cantilever is fully glazed whilst the underside is clad in polished aluminium, creating a mirror that reflects the hotel roof below. Part of the NHow chain, the 310-room hotel contains music facilities that include a ballroom and a sound studio.

Studio Gang

Mira Tower
A sophisticated curtain wall facade system allows the bays to be attached to a repeatable structural slab from inside the building, reducing the need for a tower crane on site and limiting energy consumption and neighborhood impact during construction. The bays allow for a high-performance facade that is 55 percent opaque without inhibiting nearly 180-degree-views in every unit. The high-performance facade, along with an innovative VRF cooling system, allows the building to exceed ambitious California Title 24 energy standards. This, along with a state-of-the-art graywater harvesting system, green roofs, and high-efficiency fixtures, puts the project on target for LEED Gold certification.

michael maltzan

Bettina pavilion
The Bettina is a limited-edition architectural pavilion designed for REVOLUTION that debuted at Design Miami in 2015. It is simple in silhouette yet also a complex three-dimensional form. Recalling the iconic style and pyramidal form of the classic white tent, the contemporary pavilion is simultaneously geometrically taut and sensually draped across the structural frame. Each profile peak is extruded diagonally making a roof of two ridges that appear different from every angle.

OTA+

Taipei Museum of Contemporary Art
This building proposal challenges the traditional definition of a museum and the conventional relationship between building and site. The ground floor of the building is reduced to a nominal footprint, enclosing only enough space for basic services, structure and ticketing functions. The ground plane is primarily reserved for exterior public space, including an art park, Hall of Fame, and garden walk. The bulk of the program and building mass are split by the open ground floor. Half of the building is coupled with the earth while the other half hovers in the air. The purpose is twofold; to minimize the damaging effects of extreme local weather by harnessing environmental flows toward productive outcomes and to re-conceptualize the identity of a modern art museum. The manicured roof plane of the below ground program is pocketed with water absorbing vegetation and catchment systems, while the hovering museum above expands to form open atriums, allowing diffuse light to brighten the space and passive airflow to comfortably condition the building.The program of the museum is interconnected. The Contemporary Museum of Art, Children’s Museum of Art and Administration are located within the floating mass. The lecture hall, parking, art resource center, library and classrooms are located below ground. The programs below ground are easily accessible and directly connected through vertical circulation tubes, providing both structural support for the floating mass above and space for movement systems, such as escalators, stairs and elevators between levels. All of the below ground programs are flooded with diffuse light passing through skylights that penetrate the landscape.

MARGARET GRIFFIN

Schindler’s Paradox Box

The double helix ramps descend towards the new open auditorium and climb 15 meters until they reach an open roof garden that offers interesting views from below, from above and the border between them. Helical lines are connected on the north side of the house to reconnect on the roof and at the level of the underground auditorium. The interlocking ramps create a continuous common surface that flows between them, emphasizing views of the property, Kings Road and adjoining apartment buildings. The support surfaces of the ramps are independent of the Berlin walls that support them.

STUDIO FUKSAS

Shenzhen Bao’an International Airport

The new terminal of Shenzhen Bao’an International Airport, the first airport by Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas, encompasses 63 contact gates, with a further 15 remote gates and significant retail space.
It increase the capacity of the airport by 58%, allowing the airport to handle up to 45 million passengers per year.The sculptural 500,000 sqm terminal evokes the image of a manta ray and features an internal and external double skin honeycomb motif that wraps the structure.1.5 km long, with roof spans of up to 80 m, honeycomb shaped metal and glass panels punctuate the façade of the terminal allowing natural light to filter through. Inside, the terminal is characterized by distinctive white conical supporting columns that rise to touch the roof at a cathedral-like scale.The focal point of the design is the concourse located at the intersection of the building.
Consisting of three levels – departure, arrivals and services – vertically connected to create full height voids and allowing natural light to filter from the highest level down to the lowest.

MICHAL MACIEJ BARTOSIK TENSEGRITY

lights

The tensegrity space frame light is comprised of a four strut lamp module whose geometry is the derivative of a cube. It affords a stable platonic structure with the ability to orthogonally tessellate in the x,y.z axes without change to its orientation to produce generic architectural elements such as: columns, roofs, walls and beams. Because tensegrity yields a system of structural correlation, moment force is eliminated and makes way for a high strength to weight ratio; as the system’s surface area increases, to a greater extent so too does its rigidity, allowing for generous spans and cantilevers. When arrayed, each consecutive module is pinned to the latter using its lamp connector to fasten to the mid point of an adjacent electrical tendon. The uniform array produces two distinct patterns of lamp and lattice. Where the lamps produce a luminous weave that at times resembles an orthogonal grid of offset lines, the lattice generates a sequential pattern of two distinct squares rotated at 45 degrees, one four times the size of the other.

OLAFUR ELIASSON

オラファー·エリアソン
اولافور الياسون
奥拉维尔·埃利亚松
אולאפור אליאסון
Олафур Элиассон
Your Rainbow Panorama

Olafur Eliasson’s dazzling “Your Rainbow Panorama” is a permanent installation on the rooftop of the ARoS Museum in Aarhus, Denmark. The spectacular work of art has a diameter of 52 metres and is mounted on slender columns 3.5 metres above the roof of the museum. Visitors can literally walk through the entire color spectrum viewing the world for the first time in all pink, green, blue and yellow tones.
“Your rainbow panorama enters into a dialogue with the existing architecture and reinforces what is assured beforehand, that is to say the view of the city. I have created a space which virtually erases the boundaries between inside and outside – where people become a little uncertain as to whether they have stepped into a work or into part of the museum. This uncertainty is important to me, as it encourages people to think and sense beyond the limits within which they are accustomed to moving”. -Olafur Eliasson