danny karas

sofi

in analysis of the modern skyscraper there is traditionally an aesthetic agenda that localizes itself in a “shoes” or “hat” location. The tower typology has ignored the possibility of a center distortion. This distortion acts as an aesthetic element as well as an organizational(programmatic) locator. By designing from the middle out there is a chance for the building to better blend with its context by keeping the processional elements in the center. Entrance and roof conditions mimic their tower brothers and give a moments rest in the exuberance of design. This proposal creates a center distortion and layers form through a simulation of gravity and the“claspyness” of the outer skin. The inner void acts as a way of creating a Secretary oriented office program rather than a traditional first floor security, freeing up the center of the building to the public. The project looks to rationalize itself through components rather than a monolithic form.

Lesia Trubat

Electronic Traces
E-TRACES, memories of dance
The shoes are based on the clone of Lilypad Arduino technology, which is designed for sewing into wearables. It appears that 3 force sensitive resistors are used as analog pressure sensors, measuring the force applied on the ground by the dancer’s feet.

Ed Atkins

Safe Conduct
Take off your shoes, place your belongings in the tray and empty your pockets. What happens when we unquestioningly subject to airport security regulations – or other, less overt protocols in society? This is one of the questions addressed by artist Ed Atkins in a new work produced especially for the x-rummet venue at the SMK. The video work Safe Conduct by British artist Ed Atkins is a burlesque of airport security instruction videos. Atkins mixes appropriated and CGI footage of the artist’s own devising, set to Ravel’s ‘Bolero’. A carousel of protocol, rendered bodies – both literally and metaphorically – abattoirs and metal detectors.

La La La Human Steps

New Work
Mi Deng and Jason Shipley-Holmes perform

In “New Work” (dance), the viewer was best served by looking at the bodies’ wavering outlines, the women in strapless black leotards and tights, the men in black suits (though sometimes shirtless; costumes by Liz Vandal). Observe the strobe-like effect created by the ferociously waving arms and flexed hands, or the reflections that bounced off the ballerinas’ skin and pink toe shoes. Notice the exaggerated contours of sinewy muscles.

renan marcondes

COMO UM JABUTI MATOU UMA ONÇA E FEZ UMA GAITA DE UM DE SEUS OSSOS
The performance presents the audience with the image of a male body subjugated by an object: an orange high-heeled shoe whose heel is a 30-cm stake. Unable to stand and occupy an erect, masculine and dominating position, this body moves slowly across the horizontal plane through a choreography that condenses images referring to a woman’s objectification. Based on the transformation of the shoe and its placement on a male body, the work raises questions regarding gender identity and the role of objects in this process.

Fred Sandback

Untitled
Sandback did not try to ground his art in history or theory alone, but followed a very personal approach. Growing up, he had an uncanny fascination with things that were strung. According to his own accounts he liked to watch his uncle Fred, an antiques dealer, cane chairs, and he remembered being captivated as a child by a museum exhibition on how to make snowshoes. As a camp counselor in New Hampshire, he loved archery and began making his own bows. He also seems to have been interested in straight lines; as a freshman in college, he carved a tall, narrow cat out of wood, prefiguring a lifelong interest in linear forms.

DOMINIC WILCOX

دومينيك ويلكوكس
多米尼克·威尔科克斯
דומיניק וילקוקס
ドミニク·ウィルコックス
Доминик Уилкокс
field

This installation by artist and designer Dominic Wilcox aims to breath life into the simple, inanimate shoe, making a connection with nature while referencing the lives of the absent owners. The shoe laces of seven hundred eco-friendly shoes rise up into the air as though growing towards the light creating a field of green on a bed of earth.

ROBERT AND SHANA PARKEHARRISON

ロバート&シャナ パークハリスン
로버트와 샤나 파커해리슨은
РОБЕРТ И ШАНА ПАРКЕХЭРРИСОН
שאנה פארקר והאריסון רוברט
flying shoes

“Mis fotografías cuentan historias de pérdida, la lucha humana y la exploración personal dentro de los paisajes marcados por la tecnología y el exceso de uso… (ellos) se esfuerzan con un metafórico y poético vínculo de laboriosas acciones, idiosincracias rituales y extrañas crudas máquinas dentro de cuentos acerca de nuestra experiencia moderna”

DEGENERATE ART ENSEMBLE

Red Shoes

Whitney Bai

a (pair of) shoe(s)

ILANIO AND IIMUAHII

Invisible Shoes

Kevin Beasley

Strange Fruit
Using both sculpture and musical performance in his practice, Kevin Beasley explores the physical materiality and cultural connotations of both objects and sound. His sculptures typically incorporate everyday items like clothing, housewares, or sporting goods, bound together using tar, foam, resin, or other materials. Often they also contain embedded audio equipment that warps and amplifies the ambient tones of their surroundings. For Storylines, Beasley has created two new works specifically for the Guggenheim’s Frank Lloyd Wright–designed building. Within this vast and open sonic environment, Strange Fruit (Pair 1) and Strange Fruit (Pair 2) (both 2015) offer an experience of intimacy, absorbing and reflecting the sound of the crowd at the scale of a personal conversation. Each work embodies this spirit of dialogue in its two-part structure—at its core are two athletic shoes, one merged with microphones, the other with speakers. Suspending these objects in space, Beasley compounds their technological interchange with additional layers of meaning, bringing to mind the urban phenomenon of shoes hanging from overhead wires or poles (itself an open-ended form of communication). At the same time the works’ titles refer to history of lynchings in the American South memorialized by Bronx schoolteacher Abel Meerepol in the 1937 protest song “Strange Fruit.” In these contexts, the hanging forms of Beasley’s sculptures resonate not only with his body, which molded them by hand, or with the bodies moving through the museum, but also with those inscribed in the problematic history of race and class in the United States.

Molly Haslund

CIRCLES
CIRCLES was shown in the yard of the museum at the opening and in Roskilde city in urban space like parks, parking lots, squares etc. Up to three compasses in different sizes were available for passers by and other interested during the performances.Molly Haslund ventures out into the city wearing grey: a grey suit, grey socks and grey shoes so that she blends in with the tarmac and the pavement. She carries a huge pair of compasses much taller than herself. She stops somewhere and starts drawing a white circle on the ground. She completes the first circle and then moves the pair of compasses and starts drawing a new circle that overlaps the first one. She draws a third circle and stands in her grey shoes in the middle of the circle for a moment before snapping the pair of compasses together and moving on.

Nirma Madhoo

Future Body

A stiff cyborg, fixed with a glazed and expressionless stare, dips her fingers into an alien-like amniotic fluid. Gravity shifts as droplets reverse upwards, forming a pulsing headpiece that encases her smooth, almost porcelain skull. ‘Future Body’, a new film by Nirma Madhoo, uses CGI and animated 3D modelling to explore technological embodiment, enacting it in a character that transgresses expected gender roles in a newly mechanised system of digital-infused aesthetics.
Set in the clinical, segmented interiors of a simulated hyper-real space, Madhoo’s cyborg is found dressed for battle, in pieces forming exoskeletons, a spinal scorpion’s tail and mantis-like shoes, designed by Iris van Herpen. A collision between her human and technological self is physicalised as she undergoes mitosis, splitting into two and performing a combative dance with her duplicate.
Currently showing in Melbourne in an exhibition titled ‘Fashion Performance: Materiality, Meaning, Media’, alongside work from Hussein Chalayan, BOUDICCA and POSTmatter collaborator Bart Hess, it offers a glimpse into the collapse of gender, species and machine into one another, in turn reimagining the future for fashion design and communication.

ADRIANA SALAZAR

Machine that tries to tie two shoelaces together

PEDRO REYES

佩德罗·雷耶斯
페드로 레예스
ПЕДРО РЕЙЕС
dump shoes

DAVID KIRSHOFF

shoelight

JOO YOUN PAEK

power soccer shoe

Heidi Kumao

Protest

“Protest” is from the project, “Misbehaving: Media Machines Act Out”(2002-2007), a series of mechanical girls’ legs, each with their own prescribed and programmed behavior. In each tableau, an electronically controlled, mechanical being protests with a voice of erratic physical gestures and projected video imagery. As a combination of robotics and performance, they represent girls who disobey or resist expectations. Unlike machines designed for perfect job performance, these machines will declare their fallibility, impatience, approval, and disapproval through small gestural acts. In these tableaus of protest and transformation, the machine is spirited, emotional, thoughtful, and irregular. “Protest” consists of aluminum, mechanized pairs of 6 year-old girl’s legs fitted with shoes and standing on a table top. An electronic circuit and proximity sensors make her responsive to the presence of viewers for whom she stomps loudly and erratically

ROBERT AND SHANA PARKEHARRISON

ロバート&シャナ パークハリスン
로버트와 샤나 파커해리슨은
РОБЕРТ И ШАНА ПАРКЕХЭРРИСОН
שאנה פארקר והאריסון רוברט
Shoes for Pan

ANGELIKA LODERER

untitled(shoes)

SEBASTIAN ERRAZURIZ

سيباستيان ارازوريز
塞巴斯蒂安·埃拉苏里斯
cry baby shoe2

DOMINIC WILCOX

دومينيك ويلكوكس
多米尼克·威尔科克斯
דומיניק וילקוקס
ドミニク·ウィルコックス
Доминик Уилкокс
GPS shoes

URS FISCHER

Урс Фишер
nomadic art tent
The nomadic sculpture that Urs Fischer created for Station to Station is something of a steamy interior dreamscape, a glittery, shimmering vision that hypnotizes with lights and textures that both welcome and disorient. In the center of the piece is a plush Hasten’s bed on which viewers lie surrounded on all sides by mirrors and cloud-like smoke. A disco ball rotates above. Is this a place for disco naps? Or is it a glamorous fantasy of decadence and visual riches? Spend some time, look at yourself in the many reflective surfaces, and feel the bedding against your skin and decide for yourself. Dreamy as it is, this space is grounded in the real world and governed by the laws of physics. This place seems like a fantasy, but it is entirely real. As one critic noted of an earlier Fischer work:In a world increasingly defined by virtual realities and digital imaging, is the creative mastery of hand manufacture merely a quaint artistic throwback — nostalgia for a lost cultural past? Is this sculpture a memorial? Given today’s ubiquitous special effects wizardry, shouldn’t art clasp technology to its bosom? There’s nothing virtual about the softness of the bed, nothing digital about the gleam of those lights or the mist surrounding you. Take off your shoes. Climb inside. This is real life.

ARTURO TEDESCHI

NU:S Parametric Shoes

IRIS SCHIEFERSTEIN

horseshoes

RACHEL ARMSTRONG

Protocell Shoe

IGOR DEWE

sandcasle penis shoes