Lisa Park

Eunoia II
It is an interactive performance and installation that attempts to display invisible human emotion and physiological changes into auditory representations. The work uses a commercial brainwave sensor to visualize and musicalize biological signals as art. The real-time detected brain data was used as a means to self-monitor and to control. The installation is comprised of 48 speakers and aluminum dishes, each containing a pool of water. The layout of “Eunoia (Vr.2)” was inspired by an Asian Buddhist symbol meaning balance.’ The motif of number 48 comes from Spinoza’s ‘Ethics’ (Chapter III), classifying 48 human emotions into three categories – desire, pleasure, and pain. In this performance, water becomes a mirror of the artist’s internal state. It aims to physically manifest the artist’s current states as ripples in pools of water.

Antoni Rayzhekov

10VE:SEQUENCE FOR TWO
10VE:SEQUENCE FOR TWO is a duet for two amplified bodies equipped with wireless biofeedback and movement devices, measuring the performers heart-rate, stress-level, breath and movement. The synchronizations and correlations of the signals generate a musical representation of the occurring processes between their bodies.

 

CASEY REAS

KTTV
This documentation video captures a few minutes of a continuous, generative collage. The source for the collage is one hour of edited signals captured from KTTV (198 – 204 MHz @ 34°13′29″N, 118°3′47″W) in August 2015
The sound was created by Philip Rugo

Helene Steiner

Project Florence
Plants synthesize a very large amount of information via electrical and chemical signals and deliberately make changes to themselves, their neighbors and the land nearby for their benefit. This signals caused by cell depolarization through ions fluxes such as K + , Ca2 + , H + , Na + , and Cl alert the whole plant for localized stimuli, such as biotic and abiotic stress and are one of the most universal properties of living organisms. In project Florence we take advantage of the sensibility of plants to different light frequencies and use it to trigger a plant response through manipulation and compare the similarities between plants and natural language processes.

The OCR

Specimen Box

The OCR began work on Specimen Box in 2014 at the request of Microsoft’s Digital Crimes Unit. Microsoft’s Cybercrime Center monitors communications coming from hundreds of millions of PCs around the world that have become infected by botnet malware. Employing data sonification together with advanced visualization techniques, Specimen Box provides a configurable multi-sensory presentation of botnet signal activity in real time. It also features a multitouch gesture-based interface for navigating, exploring, selecting, and examining the billions of signals that have previously been collected. Users can access the collected signals based on their activity levels, the geographic locations of their sources, or their daily activity patterns over time, using clustering to group sources with similar behavior.

Richard Vijgen

WiFi Impressionist
Wifi Impressionist is a field installation that draws electromagnetic landscapes inspired by the cityscapes of William Turner. The work consists of a directional antenna on a pan-tilt mechanism that listens for WiFi signals and builds a three dimensional model of the signals around it. From this model a viewport is selected that defines the perspective and the frame. Signals that are picked up within the frame are visualised as waves emitted from a specific origin and drawn using a mobile plotter. The antenna and the plotter are both mounted on a tripod and can be placed in the field much like a painter would set up his easel. Once positioned and oriented a drawing becomes denser over time depending on the density of networks around it. Wherever there is a WiFi signal, the drawing will eventually fill the frame.

MAIA URSTAD

Maia Urstad, a sound artist based in Bergen, Norway, joined ISIS in 2009 for a 3-week research residency. Maia’s research was based around using and adapting portable radio systems and local FM-transmissions. Maia explored the Northumberland coast where she carried out experiments with multiple radios, broadcastings signals across the North Sea from the cliffs of Howic and the beaches surrounding Bamburgh in an attempt to communicate across the sea, attempting to reach her home town of Bergen.

Yamaha & Kaiji Moriyama

Mai Hi Ten Yu
Yamaha artificial intelligence (AI) technology enabled the world-renowned dancer Kaiji Moriyama to control a piano by his movements. The AI adopted in the system can identify a dancer’s movement in real time by analyzing signals from four types of sensors attached to a dancer’s body. This system has an original database that links melody and movements, and, with this database, the AI on the system creates suitable melody data (MIDI) from the dancer’s movements instantly. The system then sends the MIDI data to a Yamaha Disklavier™ player piano, and it is translated into music.

iris van herpen

sensory seas
runway LOOK 08

“The first threads of inspiration came from the Spanish neuroanatomist Ramón y Cajal. He wanted to uncover something that no one had yet understood.
Sensory seas’ holds a microscope over the indelible nuances between the anthropology of a marine organism, to the role of dendrites and synapses delivering infinite signals throughout our bodies. It enchants the attention of how two processes of torrential messaging exist in an uninterrupted state of flux. The collection consists 21 silhouettes that illustrate a portrait of liquid labyrinths, where dresses spill onto the floor in elegant train and pigments gather in cloudedpools of blues and lilac, leaking into one another like marble.” Joanna Klein

PHILLIP STEARNS

فيليب ستيرنز
Fragmented Memory

As electronic media (digital or analog), images, video, and sound become reduced to signal—a manifestation of some order defined within a certain system—Light and Sound themselves become raw materials for reconstituting electronic signals back into physiological experience.

iris van herpen

АЙРИС ВАН ЭРПЕН
イリス ヴァン ヘルペン
skeleton dress

Van Herpen sees fashion as a form of self expression that associates her fascinations about reality of everyday life and translates into her collection. Each collection has its own story. For example, dresses from her Radiation Invation collection reflect her fantasies about what the world would like if we could see all the radiation and signals around us.

CHRISTOPH HAAG, MARTIN RUMORI, FRANZISKA WINDISCH AND LUDWIG ZELLER

open circuit
file festival

Open circuit is a sound installation by Christoph Haag, Martin Rumori, Franziska Windisch and Ludwig Zeller. The team created the project while studying at the Academy of Media Arts Cologne. Open circuit consists of a labyrinth of open copper trails that cover the floor and walls of the installation space. These trails carry the electrical signals of a multichannel sound repository which become audible when wireless speakers are placed on the copper. The sound emitted by the speakers alters depending on how they are moved.