STINE DEJA

Utero Termico
“Thermal Womb, una scultura di figura sospesa a testa in giù che richiama la pratica della crioconservazione. La struttura è infatti una replica del meccanismo utilizzato da aziende come Alcor, che prepara i corpi prima che vengano immersi nell’azoto liquido, figure congelate a tempo indefinito, in attesa che la tecnologia le raggiunga e le faccia rivivere. La componente cinematografica del lavoro rivela un paio di luminosi occhi blu, la cui unica animazione è battere le palpebre, aggiungendo uno strato basato sul tempo alla natura altrimenti statica del pezzo. Stephanie Cristello

Thom Kubli & Prof. Hiroshi Ishii

Orbiting
Orbiting features floating, machine-generated sculptures. The 3-D-printed objects — made from an ultra-light material — are injected with helium and released into the air as they become buoyant. As the ascending sculptures rise toward the ceiling, they enter the flow of a thermal stream and begin their gentle orbit. While floating, these ethereal objects participate in a continuously changing series of celestial movements.

Kerstin Ergenzinger

Wanderer Spacetime Poetry
Wanderer Spacetime Poetry is a continuously evolving installation series. Wanderers are small modified and individually programmed thermal printers that roam along paper strips that are stretched in different constellations across a space. On their journeys the Wanderers leave traces behind, a line, a dot or words. Like a snail with its trail the units dynamically create a poetic drawing over the course of an exhibition.

Yonakani: Young ah Seong, Takuji Narumi & Tomohiro Akagawa

Thermotaxis
file festival
The term “Thermotaxis” signifies a movement of a living organism in response to heat stimulation. A thermal spot has power to encourage people to gather together like open fires in winter or water places in summer. The work “Thermotaxis” characterizes the open space as invisible thermal spots by providing people with thermal information. Our work aims to create a new spatial structure for communication not by architectural approach but by using information technology.

Stine Deja

THERMAL WOMB
“Thermal Womb, a sculpture of figure suspended upside down that recalls the practice of cryopreservation. The structure is indeed a replica of the mechanism used by companies such as Alcor, which prepares bodies before they are submerged in liquid nitrogen—figures indefinitely frozen, waiting for technology to catch up and revive them. The film component of the work reveals a pair of bright blue eyes, whose only animation is to blink, adding a time-based layer to the otherwise static nature of the piece.” Stephanie Cristello

CHRISTOPHER BAKER

Murmur Study
Murmur Study (ou l’étude des murmures) est une œuvre d’art originale qui propose une réflexion autour de l’art et du web. Elle a été réalisée par Christopher Baker, Márton András Juhász et Budapest Kitchen, et se veut être un observatoire des technologies de micro-blogging comme Twitter et les status Facebook. L’installation est composée de 30 imprimantes thermales qui impriment en continu des messages Twitter récoltés aux quatre coins de la planète. Les messages tombent des imprimantes comme des chutes d’eau avant de venir s’empiler par terre.

Aernoudt Jacobs

PHOTOPHON

photophon #1 is an installation based on intensive acoustic research of the photoacoustic effect. The photoacoustic effect is based on the phenomena of radiant energy. A strong light source can be converted into a sound wave due to absorption and thermal excitation. This causes sound waves due to pressure variations. The photoacoustic effect was discovered in the 19th by Alexander Graham Bell. He then used candlelight, sunlight, and the first forms of electricity in order to amplify sound.

SPLITTERWERK

bio intelligence quotient house
Dubbed the Bio Intelligent Quotient (BIQ) House, the approximately €5 million building was designed by Splitterwerk Architects and funded by the Internationale Bauausstellung (IBA), a long-running exhibition series showcasing cutting edge techniques and architectural concepts, for this year’s International Building Exhibition – 2013.
A total of 129 algae culturing tanks are affixed to the East and West sides of the building via an automated external scaffolding structure that constantly turns the tanks towards the sun. The plant cultures are fed through an integrated tubing system, CO2 is pumped in as well.According to Arup’s Europe Research Leader, Jan Wurm, who collaborated with Splitterwerk on the project:The algae flourish and multiply in a regular cycle until they can be harvested. They are then separated from the rest of the algae and transferred as a thick pulp to the technical room of the BIQ. The little plants are then fermented in an external biogas plant, so that they can be used again to generate biogas. Algae are particularly well suited for this, as they produce up to five times as much biomass per hectare as terrestrial plants and contain many oils that can be used for energy.Not only do these tanks provide shade for every level of the building during the summer and biogas for heating during the winter, the facade itself collects excess heat not being used by the algae, like a solar thermal system. That heat can then either be used immediately or stored in 80-meter-deep, borine-filled borehole heat exchangers located under the structure. Total fossil fuels used in this process: zero.

LANCE WINN

thermal walls