RYUNOSUKE OKAZAKI

Ryunosuke Okazaki 001
For his graduate project from the Tokyo University of the Arts, Ryunosuke Okazaki created a collection consisting of three couture dresses in bold colours and shapes titled JomonJomon that are informed by Japanese Jōmon-era pottery and Shinto, an ancient religion that originated in Japan. The striking designs are modelled and decorated on Jōmon-era pottery, where vessels were decorated through pressing rope and coils into wet clay to create ornate designs. The JomonJomon collection was made using polyester, cotton and ribbed knits, in red, blue, black and white as the primary colours.

Nina Katchadourian

Survive the Savage Sea

When I was seven years old, my mother read a book aloud to me titled Survive the Savage Sea (1973). It was the true story of the Robertsons, a family of farmers in England who sold all their possessions to buy a sailboat with the intent of sailing around the world for several years. In June 1972, the Robertsons lost their sailboat in a remote part of the Pacific Ocean when a pod of Orca smashed the hull, leaving the four adults and two children adrift for 38 days. After their inflatable life raft grew too leaky to be safe, they abandoned it for their nine-foot fiberglass dinghy, Ednamair, a vessel so small that with everyone aboard only six inches of the boat remained above the waterline. The family navigated to areas where they could collect rainwater and survived by finding ways to catch sea turtles, dorado, and flying fish until they were spotted and rescued by the crew of a Japanese fishing boat.

video

Damien Jalet and Kohei Nawa

Vessel
les corps se rassemblent alors pour former les vaisseaux de naissance. Avec un mélange de jambes et de bras, la forme des danseurs crée des roches comme des entités vaginales, d’où émergent de nouvelles créatures. C’est une scène de prison. Il est intelligent et vient clairement d’esprits exceptionnellement créatifs.

EMILIJA ŠKARNULYTĖ

Mirror Matter
In the neutrino observatory rendered in Mirror Matter, slow panning movement gives a sense of the immensity of the nearly 13,000 photo-multipliers that inhabit this strange vessel – their ‘eyes’ engineered to watch light. Another frame depicts the Hadron Collider at CERN; its architecture envisioned through lidar scans, producing a dynamic, transparent imprint in three dimensions. Described as a vision that flows through the body, it is imagined by Škarnulytė as alien archaeological vision’ with the ability to see through, and as the experience of sight farthest from the human realm. Through simultaneous perspectives, the constant surveying motion that weaves a continues thread through each video narrative, and the immersion generated by the reflective black ceiling, the viewer is imparted with this panoptical mode of perception.

TARIK KISWANSON

Father Form
Each “Father Form” becomes a sort of portal, a vessel for a trance-like experience. Upon entering, the spectator will become multiplied, obliterated, and disjointed by the multiple reflections. This sensation is amplified by the profound sonority of the work. These sculptural vessels blur the boundaries between inside and outside, opening and enclosure, the individual and the collective.

Thomas Heatherwick

Vessel
“It’s not a building, it’s not a sculpture, it’s not an artwork, and yet it has scale and relevance to all of those typologies… In a way, we’re thinking of this as a piece of furniture. Its ongoing use will evolve, quite naturally.”

kathy hinde

Tipping point
Tipping Point forms both a sculptural sound installation and the basis of a live performance in which Kathy Hinde controls all the aspects of the installation live including the speed of the motors, the positions of the mechanical arms, the water levels, and how many glass vessels are resonating. She works with a range of guitar pedals to re-pitch the sounds, accentuate different frequencies, and add reverb to augment the soundscape to create an immersive composition.

Kaminer Design

קמינר תכשיטים
ossomateria

The name of the project is derived from Italian, meaning ‘bone-matter’, the material of essence. The very base of humanity, our body and its unique structure, inspired me to explore the inner architecture of our physical vessel, the shapes and meaning of the internal organs and led me to create pieces in their image.

Nelo Akamatsu

Chozumaki

CHOZUMAKI by Nelo Akamatsu consists of a glass vessel filled with water. A small winged magnet rotating at the bottom of the vessel produces a vortex. The tiny bubbles cause curious sounds when they are swallowed into the vortex. Viewers will hear these sounds through a spiral pipe shaped like a cochlear duct. Countless vortices exist in the universe, including the enormous revolution of the galaxy and also the minimal spin of electrons. They all have a fractal structure that seems to be one of the fundamental elements of the universe. Water has another important role in this work. In numerous cultures is associated with purification. The sight and sound of the water vortex that is constantly changing shape will remind viewers of crossing the boundary between the physical world and the psychological world, and will extend their perception of vital organs.

RACHEL GARRARD

VESSEL

Lilah Fowler

Vessel

Peter Flemming

Canoe
The work here in Dawson is like an old vehicle in which I’ve put a new engine. Entitled Canoe, it consists of an approximately 20 foot long trough of water, that resembles some kind of boat. This provides a means for a gunwales tracking mechanism to slowly, endlessly paddle its way back and forth. It was first constructed in 2001 in a studio beside Halifax harbour. It draws visual inspiration from the bridges and water vessels of this port. Conceptually, it grew from an interest in technological obsolescence: how things (like canoes) make shifts from utility to leisure.
It has experienced several major rebuilds since 2001. Most of them have been practical, but for Dawson I’ve opted for an experimental configuration that changes significantly the nature of the work. Previously, Canoe has only ever been shown indoors. Normally in runs on rechargeable batteries, with a continuous, smooth motion. In Dawson, it is shown outdoors, alongside the Yukon river, showing up in an absurd way the paleness of its artificial river. Here, the primary source of power is sunlight.
Making use of the long northern day, solar panels receive light, storing energy in an array of super-capacitor cells. At this time, Canoe remains still. A custom circuit monitors the amount of charge, and when a predetermined trigger point is reached, it is dumped into Canoe’s electric motor in a burst, allowing it to make a few strokes. Then Canoe rests, while the charging cycle begins again. Motion is intermittent, entirely dependent on the amount and intensity of sunlight. It ranges from near standstill in overcast conditions to perhaps 1 or 2 strokes every minute in full light. The technical term for this type of circuit is a relaxation oscillator. I like this term because, if you remove it from its technical context, it points back to ideas about leisure and utility.

Lisa Wilson

Empty Vessel

SPLINTER WORKS

Vessel Hammock Bathtub

SOFIAN AUDRY, STEPHEN KELLY AND SAMUEL ST-AUBIN

Vessels Nocturne Halifax

ANTONY GORMLEY

Энтони Гормли
أنتوني غورملي
葛姆雷
アントニー·ゴームリー
vessel