AES+F

The Feast of Trimalchio: Arrival of Golden Boat

AES+F 1

source: vanhaerentsartcollection

Forty years after Federico Fellini’s polemic film interpretation of Satyricon (1969) by the Roman writer Gaius Petronius Arbiter, AES+F also revisits this classical literary work in their piece The Feast of Trimalchio (2009). This video installation is based on Cena Trimalchionis, a section in Satyricon in which the freedman Trimalchio takes centre stage and who went down in history as the epitome of opulence, luxury and unbridled pleasure. Trimalchio thus embodies Vanitas: human pleasures are finite, just like human existence itself.

AES+F’s The Feast of Trimalchio is made up of individual digital photographs taken with hundreds of models in a studio. By mounting the images behind each other a slow stiffly mannered movement of the figures is created which defines the entire atmosphere of the video. The setting – an artificial island with an imposing luxury hotel built in a style that sits somewhere between imperial and colonial architecture – is completely digitally created. Although the piece is not explicitly narrative, the viewer understands the ambiguous play of power and seduction that unfolds between the hotel guests and the hotel staff. In keeping with the Roman Saturnalia festival, in which master and slave switched roles during the solstice, AES+F’s narcissistic guests gradually become servants and the staff take on the self-glorifying role of the hotel guests.

The Feast of Trimalchio creates a seductive but at the same time repulsive artificial paradisiacal world against a backdrop of unremittent threat (tsunamis, UFOs, etc.). The artists consciously seek out this paradox: ‘The level of the ideal in our project is heightened to the level of the absurd. Our catastrophes are like Disneyland attractions. A tsunami, for example, does not result in death and destruction, a runner pursued by waves looks more like a jogger, panic resembles baroque art with falls and angles found in paintings of the period. We wanted to create a world so ideal and wonderful that it begins to border on the repulsive’.

Arzamasova Tatiana – 1955, Russia
Evzovich Lev – 1958, Russia
Svyatsky Evgeny – 1957, Russia
Fridkes Vladimir – 1956, Russia

The Russian artist collective AES was set up in 1987 when the architect couple Tatiana Arzamasova and Lev Evzovich began to work permanently with graphic designer Evgeny Svyatsky. In 1995, photographer Vladimir Fridkes joined the group, which changed its name to AES+F. The manipulation of the glamorous fashion, lifestyle, film and advertising imagery that has flooded Russia since the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991 is a constant theme in their oeuvre, which ranges from sculpture to photography and video art.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: art-almanaccomau

Stepping inside ‘The Feast of Trimalchio’ by Russian collective AES+F is like checking in to an alternative world where perfect bodies populate a sweeping computer-generated landscape accompanied by the orchestral soundtrack of Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony. It is a spectacular work that dissects the experience of high-end contemporary lifestyle. In observing this opulent world, we feel a sense of indulgent, guilty pleasure.

The exhibition title comes from the Roman novel ‘Satyricon’, by Petronius, in which Trimalchio’s character becomes associated with wealth, luxury, gluttony and pleasure. AES+F reproduces these themes in a 21st century context by creating an imagined paradise set on a luxurious island resort. The panoramic landscape of this other world sweeps across a 9-channel video installation, depicting the guests and servants engaged in leisure activities and enveloping the viewer in a fragmented experience of the environment and architecture.

The inhabitants of this paradise are of diverse cultural backgrounds and can be distinguished by their clothing – the hotel guests are dressed in white robes and the servants wear traditional dress. As they move in slow, robot-like choreography, the formations of group dynamics against the generic landscape evokes historical references, such as to neoclassical and baroque styles of art and architecture.

While this otherworldly representation of perfection is captivating, seductive and incredibly easy to watch, AES+F subtly blends in much more complex associations to place, identity and history.

This bizarre and fictional realm is a computer-generated non-place. Although familiar, the landscape is not distinguishable and the people form no identity. They construct a standardised global world, where every experience is paid for, and every person plays out an image of themselves. By doing this, AES+F portrays leisure as an experience that is acted, and envisages that our experiences will become more about the image of pleasure rather than the pleasure itself. This suggests an ‘image economy’, where our lives are made up of a series of theatrical moments that represent an assumed set of activities and emotions, but lack substantial connection. As Dr Uros Cvoro says in his catalogue essay, “People themselves are only a supplement to the lifestyle they are living”.

As the work continues to unfold, the guests and servants begin to reverse roles, bringing into play the dynamics between upper and lower class, shifting cultural distinctions, and the disregard of political constructs. Further complications occur when we notice the resort is surrounded by armed guards and metal detectors, creating sinister undertones which are eventually revealed by catastrophic events that become seamlessly blended into this artificial existence.

Time and speed are also important devices. Spending time at a resort, as well as the element of fashion and superficial identities, suggests the temporality of this lifestyle. The slow-motion speed at which the people move is as if they are constantly aware of how they are being perceived – again referring to the image-driven existence. However this poses new questions. Who are they acting for? Is it for each other, or outside viewers?

AES+F has created a post-contemporary, globalised world in which nothing seems to naturally fit but so smoothly blends together. They present human life as a commercial product, challenging us to determine where the barrier lies between true experience and an acted image of that experience. With twists in every new frame, roles are reversed, disasters blend into paradise, and we are challenged by the value of our lives. This world is so perfect that it becomes strange, and with the high-end visual aesthetics, we can’t look away.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: rtvees

AES se formó en 1987 en Moscú. Ya la elección de un nombre parecido al de una gran corporación multinacional se corresponde con la estrategia que guiará al grupo a lo largo de su trayectoria: la confusión, la ambigüedad, y, en consecuencia, el juego con la percepción del espectador.

Las tres siglas se corresponden con los apellidos de los tres miembros fundadores, los arquitectos Tatyana Arzamasova (Moscú, 1955) y Lev Evzovich (Moscú, 1958), y el diseñador gráfico, especializado en la ilustración de libros, Evgeny Svyatsky (Moscú, 1957). Desde 1995 han colaborado con el renombrado fotógrafo de moda Vladimir Fridkes (Moscú, 1956) en varios proyectos, firmados con las siglas AES+F.

Desde sus inicios AES han ido a contracorriente. En los años pre- y post-perestroika no se dejaron encasillar ni en el arte soviético oficial ni en el movimiento underground moscovita. Y en la actualidad el único apelativo que acaso aceptarían sería el de artistas post-conceptuales.

Al confrontarnos con los últimos tabúes, sus obras a veces parecen rozar los límites del buen gusto, pero la extremadamente cuidada estética de las mismas produce discordancia, distensión y, en última instancia, distracción del contenido y confusión en el espectador.
Dicha estética seductora, entre barroca y publicitaria, es utilizada, según Tatyana Arzamasova para ‘disfrazar el veneno de la forma más dulce posible’, mientras que para Evgeny Svyatsky es crítica y homenaje a la vez de la belleza formal y Lev Evzovich la considera un vehículo más para provocar interpretaciones múltiples, en muchos casos dialécticamente opuestas.

METRÓPOLIS, que ha entrevistado a los cuatro artistas en su estudio de Moscú, ofrece un repaso por las primeras obras de AES, consistentes en grandes instalaciones de pintura como Apollo Inspiring an Epic Poet (Apolo inspirando a un poeta épico, 1989), Pathetic Rhetoric (Retórica patética, 1990) o Decorative Anthropology (Antropologia decorativa, 1991). En esta última ya están presentes elementos adicionales en forma de tubos de sangre; es el inicio de una relación con la medicina que, en Body Space (Espacio corporal, 1995), se formaliza en objetos realizados con fotografías médicas. Después de trabajar en este y otros proyectos con fotografías ready-made, AES empieza a trabajar con Vladimir Fridkes. Entre los primeros frutos de esta colaboración están las series fotográficas Corruption. Apoteosis (Corrupción. Apoteosis, 1996) y Suspects (Sospechosas, 1997), compuesta de retratos en primer plano de catorce chicas adolescentes. Siete de ellas eran alumnas de buenas escuelas; las otras siete estaban recluidas en colonias-reformatorios por asesinato en primer grado. Con este proyecto, de cuyas protagonistas sigue sin revelarse su identidad, AES+F retan y frustran las asunciones del espectador de poder juzgar por las apariencias.

Islamic Project (Proyecto islámico, 1996-2003), y, sobre todo, la foto de la Estatua de la Libertad con Burka, es probablemente la obra más conocida de AES fuera del ámbito artístico y la culminación de su estrategia de ambivalencia. Volviendo a las fotografías ready-made en forma de postales turísticas, crearon collages que combinan conocidos monumentos arquitectónicos occidentales con edificios y escenas provenientes del mundo islámico. A pesar de su incorrección política el proyecto se hizo sumamente popular, proporcionando invitaciones de varias instituciones culturales de Occidente que querían ser ¿islamizados¿ y valiéndole al colectivo el cualitativo de ¿profetas¿ después del 11-S. Este hecho, así como la utilización de las imágenes como advertencia por parte de la extrema derecha estadounidense no carecen de ironía si se tiene en cuenta el concepto original de la obra que consistía en proponer una globalización un tanto más equitativa.

Si con Proyecto Islámico, AES habían conseguido la colaboración (involuntaria) de los medios de comunicación en la difusión de su obra, el papel de estos en la creación de estrellas mediáticas y del fenómeno de necrofilia pública son el punto de partida de Who Wants to Live Forever? (¿Quién quiere vivir para siempre?, 1998), una serie de fotos en las que una actriz representa a Lady Di herida después del accidente. La muerte ¿uno de los últimos tabúes- es asimismo una de las protagonistas de Defile (Desfile, 2000-2008), junto al mundo de la moda, ya que las vestimentas y joyas con que están ataviados los cadáveres de personas anónimas bien podrían haber salido de una de las grandes casas de moda internacionales.

Otros dos temas recurrentes en los proyectos recientes de AES+F son la infancia y la violencia. La trilogía en video The King of the Forest (El rey de los bosques, 2003) actualiza la leyenda del ogro que se lleva a los niños para tenerlos prisioneros y, al final, matarlos, con niños ¿abducidos¿ y utilizados por los medios de comunicación. Action Half-Life (2005) y The Last Riot (El último motín, 2006) investigan tanto la figura del héroe como la confusión entre violencia real y virtual, provocada por videojuegos, películas de Hollywood e informativos por igual.

AES+F tampoco se dejan encasillar en lo que a formatos y medios utilizados se refiere: si el proyecto Action Half-Life se manifestó en fotografías, dibujos y esculturas, con su último trabajo Europe-Europe (2008) vuelven a un soporte hace tiempo relegado, si no al olvido, a los museos del arte romántico y tiendas de souvenirs: los figurines de porcelana. Eso sí, las parejas en pose amorosa son tan inverosímiles, en estos momentos, como una relación amistosa entre fundamentalistas de lados opuestos.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: pixelcreationfr

Formé à partir de 1995, le quatuor AES+F est né de trois personnalités moscovites issues du monde de l’architecture et de Vladimir Fridkes, photographe. Enfants et adolescents sont les inquiétants supports de communication artistique du groupe, symboles de la société toute entière. Le Passage de Retz présente un concentré de ses travaux menés depuis 1997.

Après la cour intérieure du Passage de Retz, la galerie s’ouvre au visiteur à travers une énigme insolvable dédiée à ceux qui se laissent berner par les apparences. Photographiées en buste, à la manière de Rineke Dijkstra, les Suspectes (1998), soit quatorze portraits de fillettes russes d’environ 15-16 ans accueillent le spectateur afin de susciter en lui le doute. Parmi elles, sept jeunes filles ont commis des crimes, pour la plupart exécutés au couteau de cuisine… AES+F joue sur l’uniformisation des postures, des vêtements et de la lumière pour provoquer une instinctive enquête chez le spectateur. Laquelle est innocente, laquelle est dangereuse ? Tenues en joue, elles apparaissent toutes potentiellement coupables, leurs maquillages, coiffures s’élèvent comme des indices qui s’annulent les uns après les autres. Le groupe AES+F amorce ici le thème central de son travail : le monde cruel de l’adolescence comme métaphore globalisante de la société.

Tatiana Arzamasova, Lev Evzovitch et Evgeny Svyatsky ont ainsi convoqué le photographe Vladimir Fridkes à partir de 1995, pour poursuivre leurs réflexions sur ce que représente le monde des enfants pour le sens commun. Last Riot (2007), la vidéo qui fait suite à la série Suspectes, cristallise tous les aspects de l’œuvre d’AES+F. Mêlant 2D et 3D, images de synthèse et mini-séquences filmées, elle modifie le champ binoculaire du spectateur en proposant une lecture sur trois écrans. Défilante ou simultanée, l’action se déroule dans un paysage virtuel où les nouvelles technologies et le monde industriel, symbolisé par les avions et les éoliennes, flirte avec une adolescence froide, maculée de codes vestimentaires et posturaux de l’armée. Les acteurs de cette histoire apocalyptique ne sont rien de moins que de jeunes gens, androgynes et sculpturaux qui s’en prennent les uns aux autres, adoptant les gestuelles de marbres antiques, tout en recréant, le temps d’un instant, les problématiques ethniques clichées, rencontrées dans toute schématisation des caractéristiques raciales.
Une série photographique du même nom succède à cette vidéo, la musique lancinante soustraite. On retiendra volontiers la sculpture de combat Last Riot 2 (2007), immaculée et curieusement contemporaine, où la lutte absurde se poursuit, avec quelques indices temporels en plus (une figurine Hello Kitty gisant au sol, une bouteille d’Evian pliant sous le poids d’une adolescente aux couettes amidonnées…). Ruée sur le corps d’un malheureux mâle, une jeune fille voit naître de son dos, une longue queue reptilienne qui renforce la référence à la sculpture antique.

Plus loin dans l’exposition, on retrouve les garçonnets et les fillettes figés dans des espaces aux connotations fortes : Mannhattan, centre du Caire, palais Ekaterininski de St Pétersbourg. Plus d’une vingtaine d’enfants est ainsi rassemblée au centre des compositions du groupe AES+F, qui joue sur les mouvements des corps et le statisme de certains enfants. Enfin, la série Rich Boy (2000) met en scène un garçon de quelques années, aux faux airs de James Dean, dans des situations luxueuses et autres mondanités, à l’ennui avéré et déprimant. Moues et regards charmeurs sont les reflexes déjà adoptés par ce garçon, mannequin malgré lui d’un rôle que l’on souhaite le voir jouer.

Après l’exposition Mutations I, présentée à la MEP l’an dernier, le groupe AES+F prend de l’ampleur et excelle davantage dans le façonnement d’une enfance mûrie trop vite.

Agathe Hoffmann – Novembre 2007.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: domuswebit

Il gruppo russo AES+F è protagonista della mostra Unconditional Love organizzata dal National Centre For Contemporary Arts (NCCA) e dal Moscow Museum of Modern Art (MMoMA) come evento collaterale della 53° Biennale di Venezia all’Arsenale Novissimo (Tesa 89) con il progetto “The Feast of Trimalchio”. La video-installazione è realizzata usando la tecnica di foto e animazione 3D e concepita come una proiezione panoramica completa (360°) su nove schermi installata in una sala rotonda di quindici metri di diametro. Ognuna delle tre parti viene proiettata simultaneamente alle altre due su tre schermi e gli spettatori, al centro dello spazio, guardano le tre parti contemporaneamente o una dopo l’altra.

Del Satyricon di Petronio, spiritoso e lirico malinconico dell’epoca dell’imperatore Nerone, ci pervenne quasi intatto solo il capitolo dedicato alla cena di Trimalcione. La fantasia di Petronio fece del nome di Trimalcione il simbolo della ricezza e del lusso, del vizio della gola e della lussuria in barba alla fugacità della vita umana.
Abbiamo cercato di presentare qualcosa di simile nelle realta` del Terzo Millennio. Così, abbiamo visto Trimalchione, ex servo, liberto, nuovo ricco che dà conviti di molti giorni nel suo palazzo, invece che una persona, come un’immagine generalizzata di un hotel di lusso, una sorta di paradiso terrestre, il soggiorno in cui è prepagato.
Gli ospiti dell’hotel – i ‘padroni’, esponenti del “miliardo dorato”, cercano di dedicare parte del loro tempo, in qualsiasi stagione, al soggiorno presso Trimalcione odierno che ha arredato il proprio palazzo – hotel con il massimo esoticismo e lusso. L’architettura del Palazzo Hotel rappresenta un’assurda sintesi della spiaggia tropicale con la stazione sciistica. I ‘padroni’ indossano abiti bianchi che sembrano, da una parte, l’uniforme dei giusti dell’Eden temporaneo, dall’altra, la tradizionale uniforme coloniale, e, al contempo, una collezione estiva alla moda. I ‘padroni’ impersonano tutte le caratteristiche dell’umanità: ci sono, tra di loro, personaggi dai bambini ai vecchioni, hanno certi segni psicologici e sociali: un pofessore è dissimile da un broker, una donna di mondo da una intellettuale. I ‘servi’ di Trimalcione, giovani e carini esponenti di vari continenti (asiatici, africani, latinoamericani), il personale dell’industria alberghiera, dalle cameriere ai cuochi, ai giardinieri, alle guardie e ai massaggiatori. Sono tutti giovani e belli e indossano uniformi tradizionali di vario colore a seconda dell’etnia. Sono una specie di ‘angeli’ “di colore” del paradiso al quale i ‘padroni’ possono accedere per un certo tempo.
L’atmosfera della Cena di Trimalcione traspare dalla combinazione delli singoli rituali lesure & pleasure (massaggi e golf, piscine e surfing ecc.). Dall’altra parte, i ‘servi’, oltre a servire con cura gli ospiti, partecipano alla festa e attuano qualsiasi fantasia dei ‘padroni’: dal campo culinario all’erotico, masochistico e via dicendo. Alle volte, sono i ‘padroni’ a servire i servi. In ultima analisi, i ‘servi’ e i ‘padroni’ risultano tutti partecipanti ad un generale gala-ricevimento orgiastico, un convivio nello stile delle feste saturnali romani, quando i servi in abiti di patrizi si mettevano a tavola, mentre i padroni in stole di servi gli servivano.
La dolcezza della “Cena di Trimalcione” viene disturbata periodicamente dalle catastrofi che invadono il Paradiso Globale.
AES+F

Nel 1987, tre artisti di Mosca, Tatiana Arzamasova, Lez Evzovich e Evgeny Svyatsky, formarono l’AES Group. La loro prima mostra la organizzarono all’estero, nel 1989, alla Howard Yezersky Gallery a Boston, USA. Sin da allora, le opere dell’AES sono state esposte in Russia e in Europa in festival, musei e pinacoteche. Con l’entrata del fotografo Fladimir Fridkes nel 1995 il gruppo ha cambiato nome in AES+F. AES+F si occupa di fotografia, arte digitale e video art. Con il video “Last Riot”, prodotto nel 2007, il gruppo ha partecipato alla 52° Biennale di Venezia allestendo il progetto all’interno del Padiglione russo.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: www02zkmde

Das Gastmahl des Trimalchio ist die am besten erhaltene Episode in dem nur fragmentarisch überlieferten Roman Satyricon des römischen Autors Gaius Petronius Arbiter. Er schildert darin einen Exzess aus Luxus, Völlerei und Protz, zu dem der ehemalige, zu unermesslichem Reichtum gelangte Sklave Trimalchio lädt.
In der technologisch aufwendigen Videoinstallation THE FEAST OF TRIMALCHIO verortet die russische Künstlergruppe AES+F das zeitgenössische Äquivalent des antiken Gastmahls in einem zwischen Utopie und Dystopie oszillierenden Ressort des Luxustourismus. Computeranimierte Bilder zeigen eine Insel, ein hybrides Urlaubsparadies mit Sandstrand, Skipiste und Konglomeraten exotisch-klassizistischer Architektur. Gäste aller Altersstufen, die mit gigantischen Kreuzfahrtschiffen die Insel erreichen, erscheinen als Vertreter einer internationalen Oberschicht. Empfangen und bedient werden die Gäste von einem Heer überwiegend afrikanischer und asiatischer Diener in exotischen Kostümen oder Dienstuniformen. […]

Henri Dietz
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: hilker-berlinde

Mit einem Samurai-Schwert schneidet das blonde Mädchen dem Asiaten die Kehle durch. Er bleibt unverletzt, schaut entrückt in die Ferne, fällt zu Boden. Flamingos landen auf der mit Schnee bedeckten Landschaft, auf der sich schwer bewaffnete und leicht bekleidete Jugendliche scheinbar zermetzeln, ohne dass nur ein Tropfen Blut fließt. „The Last Riot“ heißt das von 2005 bis 2007 entstandene Videokunstwerk des russischen Künstlerkollektivs AES+F.

Die Gruppe gehört zu den bedeutendsten Medienkünstlern Russlands. Seit 1987 gibt es sie. Sie besteht aus den beiden Konzeptarchitekten Tatiana Arzamasova und Lev 
Evzovich, dem Designer Evgeny Svyatsky und dem Fotograf Vladimir Fridkes. Sechs Jahre haben AES+F an ihrer Videotrilogie zu den Oberbegriffen „Hölle“, „Paradies“ und Fegefeuer” gearbeitet, die jetzt in Berlin gezeigt wird. In ihren Videos vereinen sie Werbe-, Computerspiel- und Barockästhetik mit provokanten Motiven.

Das folgenlose Gemetzel in „The Last Riot“ entspricht in der Trilogie der Hölle, der zweite Teil dem Paradies. Es trägt den Titel „The Feast of Trimalchio“ und feierte 2009 auf der Biennale in Sydney Premiere. Luxus ist in dem Video allgegenwärtig, genauso wie endlose Hotelflure und uniformiertes Personal, das eine weiß gekleidete Oberschicht bewundernd anstarrt und umsorgt. Den subtilen Kampf um Macht inszenieren AES+F auch in diesem Werk in ihrer typischen Hochglanzoptik, bei der Pastell- und Neonfarben dominieren.

Der Dritte Teil der Trilogie „Allegoria Sacra“ entspricht dem Fegefeuer. Als Vorlage für das 2011 fertiggestelltes Werk diente den Künstlern Giovanni Bellinis Gemälde „Allegoria Sacra“ – es zeigt Figuren aus der christlichen und klassischen Mythologie, die auf das jüngste Gericht warten. Die Gruppe AES +F verlegt das Geschehen in ihrem Video an einen futuristischen Mega-Flughafen, auf dem Passagiere warten, die halb Mensch und halb Tier sind.

Die Kunst von AES+F mutet durch die bunten Hochglanzbilder auf den ersten Blick extrem ästhetisch und zugänglich an – doch stehen die Arbeiten der Gruppe für hermetische politische Kunst, ohne Aufruf zur Agitation. Dieser scheinbare Widerspruch ist ein Grund, warum die Werke von AES+F immer wieder Anfeindungen von verschiedenen politischen und künstlerischen Lagern ausgesetzt ist. Es lohnt sich aber, sich selbst ein Bild zu machen.