Bettina Hubby

Thanks for the Mammaries

Bettina Hubby

source: artweekla

Los Angeles-based artist and provocateur Bettina Hubby’s unique exhibition of boob-themed art includes over 100 artists who have come together to support Hubby in the face of her recent diagnosis of breast cancer and double mastectomy.
What began on Facebook as a unique and smile-inducing way for Hubby to announce her own diagnosis with breast cancer and the double mastectomy surgery that soon followed, is now coming to fruition in the form of a singular exhibition only four months later. Thanks for the Mammaries evidences an art community at its kindest. Hubby turned her health ordeal into a visually stimulating platform, and ultimately a benefit for cancer support and education, by asking for boobs. She didn’t want pity, she wanted to laugh, and so she asked for people to send her boobs, not sadness, and it worked. Every day people flowered her with images, videos and verbiage of a boob-variety unimaginable, and this helped her through, and inspired her to pay it forward. Then she sent out a call to artists to submit works for an actual exhibition and accepted all entries. The resulting array of breastishness is boggling and delightful, eerie and powerful.
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source: hubbyco

Hubby is a visual artist who consistently branches off of the role of artist-creator, into curator and project coordinator, utilizing and promoting a diverse community for topical explorations. Each artist’s practice intersecting with the others to challenge and push boundaries, both individually and collectively, and to create outside the confines of conventional exhibition settings.
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source: hubbyco

Bettina Hubby’s practice is wide-ranging, encompassing curatorial and project based work, along side more traditional media such as collage, drawing, printmaking, sculpture and photography. With projects that engage diverse communities and often exist in settings that challenge the conventions of exhibition spaces, Hubby’s work celebrates collaboration and resists easy categorization.
Earning her MFA in 1995 from the School of Visual Arts in New York, Hubby then moved to Los Angeles in 1999 and began a decade of work approaching the way in which physical objects and bodies interact with and define space, and the rituals that define construction of identity. Known in Los Angeles first for clothing related work, Hubby then expanded further into p photography, photographic fabric, vinyl decals, and outdoor banners that often found construction as a focus. collages combining clothing, objects and articulated space, drawings and paintings exploring the ritual of sex with the physical body removed, as well as extensive curatorial and collaborative projects.

Hubby recently acted as the Santa Monica Museum of Art’s Resident Construction Artist, creating installation in dialogue with the beginning of long term construction of the Olympic/26th Street Expo Metro Station at the Museum’s doorstep, a project which also inspired a construction-themed exhibition curated at the L.A. Mart, also called Dig the Dig. Other projects include The Eagle Rock Rock and Eagle Shop (2012), an installation and pop-up store in the Los Angeles community of Eagle Rock, CA the blurred the lines between curation, collection, kitsch, craft, and commerce, Get-Hubbied (2009-2011), a two year project about the institution of marriage that ultimately culminated in a legally binding wedding, and CoTour (2008), a bus tour that explored spaces of private significance throughout greater Los Angeles.