CHRISTINA DIMITRIADIS

Oblivions Exercises

source: biennale3thessalonikibiennalegr

Greek German artist, Christina Dimitriadis, was born (1967) in Thessaloniki. She lives and works in Berlin. She studied at the Film/Video Arts, New York (1993) and at the Parsons School of Design and New School for Social Research (Bachelor of Fine Arts, 1992). “Christina Dimitriadis”, as Sotirios Bahtsetzis mentions, “uses photography as a medium to express an autobiographical stance based on human relationships in terms of the concept of identity. In the artist’s strictly structured photographs an almost architectural tone prevails, an absolute minimal mise-en-scène where the lack of any arbitrary haphazard occurrence is clear. In this respect Dimitriadis’ photos have a compelling character, almost monumental”. Solo exhibitions: Symbioses, Curators without Borders (Berlin, 2008); Dystopia, Kanazawa Citizen’s Art Center (Kanazawa, 2006); I Remember All of You, Eleni Koroneou Gallery (Athens, 2005); Galerie Deux (Tokyo, 2000); Open Closed Doors, Eigen+Art Gallery (Berlin, 1999). Recent group exhibitions: Polyglossia, Onassis Cultural Centre (Athens, 2011); The First Image, Centre Régional d’Art Contemporain, Languedoc Roussilon (Sète, 2009); Transexperiences, 798 SPACE (Beijing, 2008); Turbulance, 3rd Auckland Triennial (2007); The Passion and The Wave, 6th International Istanbul Biennial (1999); La Casa, Il Corpo, Il Cuore, Museum Moderne Kunst Stiftung Ludwig (Vienna, 1999).

The Greek word for “return” is nostos. Algos means “suffering”. So nostalgia is the suffering caused by an unappeased yearning to return. To express that fundamental notion most Europeans can utilize a word derived from the Greek (nostalgia, nostalgie) as well as other words with roots in their national languages: añoranza, say the Spaniards; saudade, say the Portuguese. In each language these words have a different semantic nuance. Often they mean only the sadness caused by the impossibility of returning to one’s country: a longing for country, for home. What in English is called “homesickness”. Or in German: Heimweh. In Dutch: heimwee. But this reduces that great notion to just its spatial element. One of the oldest European languages, Icelandic (like English) makes a distinction between two terms: söknuour: nostalgia in its general sense; and heimprá: longing for the homeland. Czechs have the Greek-derived nostalgie as well as their own noun, stesk, and their own verb; the most moving, Czech expression of love: styska se mi po tobe (“I yearn for you”, “I’m nostalgic for you”; “I cannot bear the pain of your absence”). In Spanish añoranza comes from the verb añorar (to feel nostalgia), which comes from the Catalan enyorar, itself derived from the Latin word ignorare (to be unaware of, not know, not experience; to lack or miss). In that etymological light nostalgia seems something like the pain of ignorance, of not knowing. You are far away, and I don’t know what has become of you. My country is far away, and I don’t know what is happening there. Certain languages have problems with nostalgia: the French can only express it by the noun from the Greek root, and have no verb for it; they can say Je m’ennuie de toi (I miss you), but the word s’ennuyer is weak, cold -anyhow too light for so grave a feeling. The Germans rarely use the Greek-derived term Nostalgie, and tend to say Sehnsucht in speaking of the desire for an absent thing. But Sehnsucht can refer both to something that has existed and to something that has never existed (a new adventure), and therefore it does not necessarily imply the nostos idea; to include in Sehnsucht the obsession with returning would require adding a complementary phrase: Sehnsucht nach der Vergangenheit, nach der verlorenen Kindheit, nach der ersten Liebe (longing for the past, for lost childhood, for a first love).
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: biennale3thessalonikibiennalegr

Η Χριστίνα Δημητριάδη, ελληνο-γερμανικής καταγωγής, γεννήθηκε το 1967 στη Θεσσαλονίκη. Σπούδασε στο Film/Video Arts της Νέας Υόρκης (1993), στο Parsons School of Design/New School for Social Research (πτυχίο στις καλές τέχνες, 1992). «Η Χριστίνα Δημητριάδη», όπως αναφέρει ο Σωτήρης Μπαχτσετζής, «χρησιμοποιεί τη φωτογραφία ως μέσο για να εκφράσει μια αυτοβιογραφική στάση βασισμένη στις ανθρώπινες σχέσεις σε συνάρτηση με την έννοια της ταυτότητας. Στις αυστηρά δομημένες φωτογραφίες της επικρατεί ένας σχεδόν αρχιτεκτονικός τόνος, μια απόλυτα μινιμαλιστική σκηνοθεσία όπου είναι εμφανής η έλλειψη οποιουδήποτε αυθαίρετου τυχαίου περιστατικού. Από αυτήν την άποψη οι φωτογραφίες της έχουν έναν επιβλητικό χαρακτήρα, σχεδόν μνημειακό». Ατομικές εκθέσεις: Symbioses, Curators without Borders (Βερολίνο, 2008)· Dystopia, Kanazawa Citizen’s Art Center (Kanazawa, 2006)· I Remember All of You, Γκαλερί Ελένη Κορωναίου (Αθήνα, 2005)· Galerie Deux (Τόκυο, 2000)· Open Closed Doors, Eigen+Art Gallery (Βερολίνο, 1999). Πρόσφατες ομαδικές εκθέσεις: Πολυγλωσσία, Ωνάσειο, Στέγη Γραμμάτων και Τεχνών (Αθήνα, 2011)· The First Image, Centre Régional d’Art Contemporain, Languedoc Roussilon (Sète, 2009); Transexperiences, 798 SPACE (Πεκίνο, 2008)· Turbulance, 3η Τριενάλε του Ώκλαντ (2007)· The Passion and The Wave, 6η Μπιενάλε της Κωνσταντινούπολης (1999); La Casa, Il Corpo, Il Cuore, Museum Moderne Kunst Stiftung Ludwig (Βιέννη, 1999).

Η ελληνική λέξη για την επιστροφή είναι νόστος. Άλγος σημαίνει πόνος. Ως εκ τούτου η νοσταλγία είναι ο πόνος της άσβεστης επιθυμίας της επιστροφής. Για να εκφράσουν αυτήν τη θεμελιώδη έννοια, οι περισσότεροι Ευρωπαίοι διαθέτουν κάποια λέξη με ελληνική ρίζα (nostalgia, nostalgie), καθώς και άλλες λέξεις, με ρίζες στις εθνικές τους γλώσσες: añoranza, λένε οι Ισπανοί, saudade, λένε οι Πορτογάλοι. Σε κάθε γλώσσα, οι λέξεις αυτές έχουν διαφορετικές εννοιολογικές αποχρώσεις. Σε πολλές περιπτώσεις, σημαίνουν μόνο τη λύπη που προκαλεί το γεγονός ότι είναι αδύνατη η επιστροφή στην πατρίδα: μια λαχτάρα για τη χώρα, για το σπίτι. Αυτό που οι Άγγλοι ονομάζουν homesickness. Ή οι Γερμανοί Heimweh. Και οι Ολλανδοί: heimwee. Έτσι, όμως, υποβαθμίζεται αυτή η σπουδαία έννοια στο χωρικό της μόνο στοιχείο. Μια από τις αρχαιότερες ευρωπαϊκές γλώσσες, τα ισλανδικά (όπως και τα αγγλικά), διακρίνουν τους δύο όρους: söknuour: νοσταλγία με τη γενική έννοια και heimprá: λαχτάρα για την πατρίδα. Οι Τσέχοι διαθέτουν την ελληνικής καταγωγής λέξη nostalgie, καθώς και το δικό τους ουσιαστικό, stesk, και ρήμα. Η πιο παθιασμένη έκφραση αγάπης στα τσέχικα είναι styska se mi po tobe («Λαχταρώ για σένα», «Σε νοσταλγώ», «Δεν μπορώ να αντέξω τον πόνο της απουσίας σου»). Στα ισπανικά, το añoranza προέρχεται από το ρήμα añorar (νιώθω νοσταλγία), που προέρχεται από το καταλανικό enyorar, που με τη σειρά του ανάγεται στη λατινική λέξη ignorare (να μην έχεις επίγνωση, να μην γνωρίζεις, να μην έχεις βιώσει, να μην διαθέτεις ή να στερείσαι). Υπό αυτό το ετυμολογικό πρίσμα, η νοσταλγία παραπέμπει στον πόνο της άγνοιας, της έλλειψης γνώσης. Είσαι μακριά, κι εγώ δεν ξέρω τι έχεις απογίνει. Η χώρα μου βρίσκεται μακριά, και δεν γνωρίζω τι συμβαίνει εκεί. Ορισμένες γλώσσες αντιμετωπίζουν προβλήματα με την έννοια της νοσταλγίας: οι Γάλλοι μπορούν να την εκφράσουν μόνο με το ουσιαστικό από την ελληνική ρίζα και δε διαθέτουν σχετικό ρήμα. Μπορούν να πουν Je m’ennuie de toi (Μου λείπεις), ωστόσο το ρήμα s’ennuyer είναι ασθενές και ψυχρό -ή εν πάση περιπτώσει, υπερβολικά ελαφρύ για ένα τόσο βαρύ συναίσθημα. Οι Γερμανοί σπάνια χρησιμοποιούν τον ελληνικής ρίζας όρο Nostalgie, και συνήθως χρησιμοποιούν τον όρο Sehnsucht όταν αναφέρονται στην επιθυμία για κάτι που απουσιάζει. Ωστόσο, το Sehnsucht μπορεί να αναφέρεται τόσο σε κάτι που υπήρξε όσο και σε κάτι που δεν υπήρξε ποτέ (σε μια νέα περιπέτεια), και συνεπώς δεν υποδηλώνει κατ’ ανάγκην την ιδέα του νόστου. Για να περιληφθεί στο Sehnsucht ο πόθος της επιστροφής χρειάζεται μια συμπληρωματική φράση: Sehnsucht nach der Vergangenheit, nach der verlorenen Kindheit, nach der ersten Liebe (λαχταρώντας το παρελθόν, τη χαμένη παιδική ηλικία, μια πρώτη αγάπη).

Μίλαν Κούντερα, από το βιβλίο Η Άγνοια, 2000
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: paddle8

Christina Dimitriadis uses the medium of photography to articulate a very personal expression of space, one that is largely autobiographical and based on very close family relationships and references to her own immediate environment. Her quiet, yet highly poised and charged compositions focus mostly on private, domestic areas, examine the ties that bind us to the ones most close to us. They pose questions about how we occupy our most intimate and familiar spaces. Dimitriadis’ photographs are powerfully evocative precisely because they propose a host of interpretive possibilities that lie outside the picture frame. Communication, isolation, solitude, and intimacy are evoked in her quietly gripping images. The performance and the photographic series “END AND” is a collaboration between actress Stefania Gouliotis and artist Christina Dimitriadis, performed in the Kunsthalle Athena, during the exhibition “Farewell”, curated by Marina Fokidis and Themis Bazaka. In this performance directed by Christina Dimitriadis. Gouliotis is isolated in a room and must deal with a prolonged period of isolation and separation. In the performance, as well as in the photographs, Gouliotis is moving quietly throughout room, dealing with the unbearable situation of loss. Through the act of scratching at the wall she uncovers an old layer beneath, a pinkish color, almost like skin. Through this act she progressively transforms the room into a life size painting and gives another dimension to it. As the drawing grows, past and present are joined and slowly a new space is created.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: tomchristoffersendk

Dimitriadis uses the medium of photography to articulate a very personal expression of space; one that is often autobiographical and based on her close personal and family relationships. With these works, she continues her examination of the self, time and space, place and history, interpreting each of these subjects in her own particular way. Her images are a meditation on the quotidian reality of existence that poses questions about how we occupy our most intimate and familiar spaces.

For the most part, these works remain ambiguous, eschewing any straightforward reading or interpretation. Individual works, such as “the Trap” however, may be related to larger historical context. These cold, minimal images create a sense of poetic silence that is intimate, yet they do not allow for the proposal of any specific personal narrative. These concise and elegantly articulated photographs always keep the viewer at arm’s length, maintaining an underlying impenetrability and crystal clear beauty throughout.

Christina Dimitriadis is born in Greece (1967) and lives and works in Berlin. She is trained in New York at the Parsons School of Design and New School for Social Research (graduated 1992) and from F.V.A (graduated 1993). Of previous exhibitions can be mentioned: Dystopia, (solo) Kanazawa Citizen’s Art Center, Kanazawa (2006). Open Closed Doors, (solo) Eigen+Art Gallery, Berlin (1997), Transexperiences, 798 SPACE, Beijing (2008), Neue Heimat- Contemporary Art in Berlin, Internationale Kunst im Neuen Berlin, Berlinische Galerie, (2007), Wir Haben keine Probleme. Kunsthall Bergen (2007) Turbulance, 3rd Auckland Triennial, Auckland, (2007), The Passion and The Wave , 6th International Istanbul Biennial, (1999),La Casa, Il Corpo, Il Cuore, Museum Moderne Kunst Stiftung Ludwig, Vienna, (1999), Greek Realities, Kunsthallen Brandts, Odense (1997).