Jerome Bel

The show must go on

Jerome Bell

source: theguardian
Whether he’s working with a soloist from the Paris Opera Ballet or with a bunch of schoolkids, Jérôme Bel has a unique talent for making people interesting. He can reveal a dancer’s personality through the most banal fragment of choreography. By some simple act of stage magic, he can conjure a world of human intimacy from the barest of means.

In The Show Must Go On, which has been restaged for the disabled and able-bodied dancers of Candoco, plus additional guests, Bel creates that world from a playlist of classic hits. The 21 performers line up to the Beatles’ Come Together, and as they stare out at us, we look back at them: the slender, bearded man with his elegant tattoos; the one-legged woman on crutches; the delicate blonde using a wheelchair; the guy with the cosy beer belly.

The Show Must Go On by Jérôme Bel, performed by Candoco Dance Company. Photograph: Tristram Kenton for the Guardian
When they begin to dance, their moves embody sweet and silly references to the accompanying songs. Into My Arms has them seeking out partners to embrace; the Titanic theme has them leaning ecstatically into an invisible wind; Ballerina Girl’ inspires them to become their own versions of a swan queen.

For each performer, the choreography is a different physical challenge: for some, it’s an obvious struggle, but their differences are swept aside in the collective uplift of emotion and association these deeply familiar songs inspire. Having seen this work before, I was unsure how it would move me a second time. But the chemistry of the Candoco cast and the unerring wit and humanity of Bel’s direction are irresistible. When the stage darkens for John Lennon’s Imagine and the audience gradually join in a soft, spontaneous singalong, it’s one of the most potent moments of theatre I’ve known.
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source: candococouk
Candoco Dance Company presents Jérôme Bel’s award winning The Show Must Go On, bringing together a UK-wide cast of 20 performers, 19 pop songs and one DJ.

First performed in 2001, The Show Must Go On has since toured to all corners of the globe and is a world-wide audience favourite. Controlled by a DJ and audio feed, the performers follow lyrics of the songs, ranging from musicals to well-loved pop songs.

Described by the Guardian as “a mischievously entertaining conceptualist who is less interested in movement than in messing with your head”, Jérôme Bel is famous for challenging expectations and enjoying a reputation as “one of the most charismatic and galvanizing choreographers working today” (New York Times).

“The choreography crackles with an energy that makes you realise just how versatile, how unstinting, the dancers are. Wow!” The Herald
Jérôme Bel lives in Paris and works worldwide. nom donné par l’auteur (1994) is a choreography of objects. Jérôme Bel (1995) is based on the total nudity of the performers. Shirtology (1997) presents an actor wearing many T-shirts. The last performance (1998) quotes a solo by the choreographer Susanne Linke, as well as Hamlet and André Agassi. Xavier Le Roy (2000) was claimed by Jérôme Bel as his own, but was actually choreographed by Xavier Le Roy. The show must go on (2001) brings together twenty performers, nineteen pop songs and one DJ. Véronique Doisneau (2004) is a solo on the work of the dancer Véronique Doisneau, from the Paris Opera. Isabel Torres (2005), for the ballet of the Teatro Municipal of Rio de Janeiro, is its Brazilian version. Pichet Klunchun and myself (2005) was created in Bangkok with the Thai traditional dancer Pichet Klunchun. Follows Cédric Andrieux (2009), dancer of Merce Cunningham. 3Abschied (2010) is a collaboration between Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker and Jérôme Bel based on The Song of the Earth by Gustav Malher. Disabled Theater (2012) is a piece with a Zurich-based company, Theater Hora, consisting of professional actors with learning disabilities. Cour d’honneur (2013) stages fourteen spectators of the Cour d’honneur of the Palais des Papes in Avignon.
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source: mercatflorscat
Esta pieza fue creada en 2001 y es una de las obras emblemáticas en la carrera de Jérôme Bel. El espectáculo examina la relación entre el arte y la vida, entre lo más coloquial y lo más refinado, y desafía constantemente las expectativas del espectador. En un escenario sin decorados un DJ pincha canciones populares de diferentes épocas, mientras bailarines profesionales y personas sin experiencia en danza siguen las instrucciones de la letra de la canción. The show must go on forma parte del repertorio de la Deutsches Schauspielhaus de Hamburgo entre el año 2000 y el 2005 y del repertorio del Ballet de la Ópera de Lyon entre el 2007 y el 2014.

Después de trabajar en diferentes compañías de danza, Jérôme Bel empezó a presentar sus piezas, resultado de acciones y escenografías sencillas, despojadas de cualquier tipo de ornamentación. Está considerado uno de los representantes más destacados del movimiento de la no-danza. Sus espectáculos, de carácter conceptual, se inician en 1994 con Nom donné par l’auteur, una interacción entre objetos banales y bailarines. Continúan las obras Jérôme Bel (1995), Shirtologie (1997), Le dernier spectacle (1998), The show must go on (2001), Véronique Doisneau (2004), Lutz Förster (2009), Cédrix Andrieux (2009) (que vimos en el Mercat la temporada anterior), Disabled Theater (2012) y Cour d’honneur (2013), entre otros.
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source: mercatflorscat
Aquesta peça va ser creada el 2001 i és una de les obres emblemàtiques en la carrera de Jérôme Bel. L’espectacle examina la relació entre l’art i la vida, entre el més col·loquial i el més refinat, i desafia constantment les expectatives de l’espectador. En un escenari sense decorats un DJ punxa cançons populars de diferents èpoques, mentre ballarins professionals i persones sense experiència en dansa segueixen les instruccions de la lletra de la cançó. The show must go on forma part del repertori de la Deutsches Schauspielhaus d’Hamburg entre l’any 2000 i el 2005, i del repertori del Ballet de l’Òpera de Lió entre el 2007 i el 2014.

Després de treballar en diferents companyies de dansa, Jérôme Bel va començar a presentar les seves peces, resultat d’accions i escenografies senzilles, despullades de cap mena d’ornamentació. Està considerat un dels representants més destacats del moviment de la no-dansa. Els seus espectacles, de caràcter conceptual, s’inicien el 1994 amb (sobra 1 espai) Nom donné par l’auteur, una interacció entre objectes banals i ballarins. Continuen les obres Jérôme Bel (1995), Shirtologie (1997), Le dernier spectacle (1998), (falta coma) The show must go on (2001), Véronique Doisneau (2004), Lutz Förster (2009), Cédrix Andrieux (2009) (que vam veure al Mercat la temporada anterior), Disabled Theater (2012) i Cour d’honneur (2013), entre d’altres.
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source: tqwat
Jérôme Bel ist einer der international gefragtesten Künstler der zeitgenössischen Tanz- und Performance- Szene, der unter anderem mit seiner 2000 uraufgeführten Performance The show must go on den zeitgenössischen Tanz revolutioniert hat. In dem Kultstück bewegen sich 20 PerformerInnen und ein DJ zu einer Reihe unvergesslicher Songs aus 30 Jahren Popgeschichte – darunter Hits von den Beatles, Nick Cave, Céline Dion, Simon & Garfunkel, The Police, Tina Turner oder Queen. Jérôme Bel nimmt die Lieder dabei wörtlich und spinnt mit ihnen auf der Bühne kleine Geschichten, die das Publikum teils ironisch, teils liebevoll und doch immer mit ihrer ganz eigenen Poetik direkt auffordern darüber nachzudenken, was Tanz, was das Menschliche an sich, sein können. Zehn Jahre nach seiner Entstehung wird das Stück nun einmalig mit professionellen und nicht-professionellen Performern aus Wien neu für die Halle E des Tanzquartier Wien einstudiert. So entsteht auf der Basis des Original-Scores von Jérôme Bel eine einzigartige Wiener Version dieses Meisterwerks der jüngeren europäischen Tanz- und Performance Geschichte, das mittlerweile selbst zum Pop-Hit der internationalen Tanzbühnen geworden ist. Es wurde weltweit in über 50 verschiedenen Ländern aufgeführt.