RAFAEL LOZANO-HEMMER

РАФАЭЛЬ ЛОЗАНО-ХЕММЕР
拉斐尔·洛萨诺 – 亨默
ラファエル·ロサノ=ヘメル
라파엘 로자노
רפאל לוזאנו, המר

Open Air

RAFAEL LOZANO-HEMMER 8

source: openairphillynet

Open Air was an interactive artwork by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, commissioned by the Association for Public Art. The piece allowed participants’ voices to transform the sky over Philadelphia.

Using this website you could record a voice message and listen and rate other entries. The higher rated messages were played-back over the Benjamin Franklin Parkway using 24 powerful robotic searchlights that reacted, both in brightness and position, to your voice’s frequency and volume.

Every night from September 20 to October 14 the project made huge light formations, visible from 10 miles away, that were automatically controlled by your voice. Follow this link for all the details, or see the project videos and photos.

If you were in Philadelphia, you could participate using a free iPhone app, which gave your message a high priority and pointed the lights toward you when your message was in the sky.
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During the project run, 63,000 people visited this web site, from 92 countries, who left close to 6,000 messages in over 20 languages. Personalized web pages were made for each message. You may still listen to them and record your own. You can also read the final press release.
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source: thecreatorsprojectvice

Rafael Lozano-Hemmer creates art and relational architecture to foster community, thinking of his interactive works as “public fountains.” His latest installation, Open Air, records voice messages via smartphone app and translates them into patterns made by 24 spotlights fixed on the Philadelphia skyline.
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source: lozano-hemmer

Open Air was an interactive art installation designed to transform Philadelphia’s historic Benjamin Franklin Parkway, between September 20 and October 14, 2012.

In this project, twenty four powerful searchlights created unique, dynamic light formations in the sky which reacted to voice messages sent by participants using a free mobile app and this website. The public was invited to record and submit messages of up to 30 seconds in length — shout-outs, poems, songs, rants, dedications, proposals. As the messages played back in Philadelphia, the lights reacted in brightness and position to the frequency and amplitude of the voice recordings, which could be heard through the mobile app, the website and public speakers located at the Project Information Center at Eakins Oval (24th Street and the Parkway).

Priority was given to mobile app messages sent live from the Parkway during the show, but messages could also be sent through this website at any time. Messages submitted through the web were archived and played-back by the lights if other web visitors rated them highly. A personalized webpage was created automatically for every participant, featuring their message, comments, rating and images of the light designs that their voice created.

Depending on atmospheric conditions, Open Air could be seen up to 10 miles away from the Parkway each evening from 8 to 11 p.m. The Project Information Center at Eakins Oval was equipped with app download, free mobile loan stations and seating areas for watching the lights and listening to the messages. There was also be an Information Outpost located at Sister Cities Park (18th Street and Logan Square).

The Open Air voice archive also features selected “Voices of Philly,” recorded messages from distinct individuals both past and present who have inspired and influenced the flavor of Philadelphia. “Voices of Philly” messages are accessible on this website and were played at various times throughout the project. Content for “Voices of Philly” was collected by project partner WHYY executive producer Elisabeth Perez-Luna and includes David Lynch, Sonia Sanchez, Sun Ra, Louis Kahn, M. Night Shyamalan, Tina Fey, ?uestlove, Marcel Duchamp, Buckminster Fuller, Jimmy Heath, Santigold, Maurice Sendak, Patti LaBelle and many more.

Inspired by the city’s rich tradition of democracy and respect for free speech, Open Air was at once a visible voicemail system, a rant line, a public stage and an archive of recordings from Philadelphia’s past and present. The piece was the largest and brightest to date of Lozano-Hemmer’s searchlight installations. Despite its monumental size and its wide visibility, the project was not intended as a cathartic pre-programmed spectacle like a fireworks display or a son-et-lumière show. On the contrary, the piece was designed to attract personal participation that created a sense of global connection, complicity and public agency.
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source: metrolatinousa

Las zigzagueantes luces recorrerán unas 10 millas de la avenida Benjamin Franklin Parkway de Filadelfia impulsadas por las voces de los participantes tanto en la ciudad o en cualquier lugar del mundo desde el sitio de Internet openairphilly.net.

En el sitio los usuarios ya han grabado cientos de mensajes, incluyendo propuestas de matrimonio, pero se dará prioridad a los residentes locales, que podrán orientar las luces desde sus teléfonos celares por el sistema de GPS.

Por un lado, el juego de luces “te puede hacer un show nada más a ti”, pero a la vez existe la contradicción porque para muchos la luz de los reflectores pueden significar una persecución policial, dijo Lozano-Hemmer en entrevista con MetroLatinoUSA.com.

Indicó que en el sitio de Internet hay un enlace para grabar el mensaje desde la computadora y otro para escuchar, pero también hay una aplicación de OpenAir por IPhone para enviar los mensajes desde los teléfonos celulares.

El artista mexicano ya ha participado antes en proyectos similares en Vancouver, Canadá para los Juegos Olímpicos de Invierno de 2010 en Vancouver, Canadá, y en las celebraciones del Milenio en el Zócalo de la ciudad de México, entre otros.

Pero esta es la primera vez que usa los reflectores que son controlados con la voz así como los teléfonos celulares, manifestó.
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source: artspycn

拉斐尔·洛扎诺-亨默(Rafael Lozano- Hemmer)个展“Voice Array”近日在纽约Bitforms画廊开幕。拉斐尔·洛扎诺-亨默(Rafael Lozano- Hemmer)为这场展览带来了两件首次在美国亮相的项目:去年秋天开始于悉尼当代艺术博物馆的参与式装置“Voice Array”(2011)以及属于第11届哈瓦那双年展一部分的作品“Last Breath”(2012)。与这场展览同时揭幕的还有拉斐尔·洛扎诺-亨默(Rafael Lozano- Hemmer)受费城公共艺术协会委托创作的新作“Open Air”。

自90年代出现在人们的视线中起,拉斐尔·洛扎诺-亨默(Rafael Lozano- Hemmer)就开始将数字媒体、机器人学、医学科学、行为艺术以及生活体验等各不相关的领域融合到一起来创作交互式的艺术作品。他最著名的作品之一“Antimonuments”挑战了特定领域的传统定义,将重点放在了通过连接各种界面以实现“关系特定”的作品的创作之上。他通常会使用一些先进的技术,其许多项目都涉及到了机器人学、定制软件、网络链接、投映、手机、LED灯、相机以及追踪系统等等。

Open Air作品“Last Breath”被布置在了展厅入口处,它是一件机器人式的装置,在一个风箱与一个棕色的纸袋之间储存并且“传递”着一个人的呼吸。这件装置每天将会被自动激活1万次,这是一个成年人在休息时的呼吸频率。作品“Voice Array”则被布置在了展厅远端的墙面上,它是一个用于即兴演唱的结构,使用了可以闪光的LED灯以及一个定制的专门用于音频回放与记录的对讲系统。它将捕捉到的上百种声音都“翻译”成闪光信号,然后这种独特的闪光模式将作为一个循环储存起来。每一个新的声音记录都会将之前所有记录的位置往下推,而逐渐人们就可以听到之前所有记录下来的声音。