Herman Kolgen

Eotone
With EOTONE, Kolgen and Letellier reflect on distance and weather, by staging something intangible yet powerful: the wind. Four sound and sculptural diffusers, containing elements of both the weather vane and the fog horn, make up this monumental installation that renders in movement and sound the direction and force of the wind blowing simultaneously on two continents: in Montreal and Quebec City on one side of the Atlantic, in Rennes and Nantes on the other. The wind data recorded in each city is transmitted live to the diffusers, controlling the orientation of each of the structures and orchestrating the combined chords that make up the harmonic whole perceived at the heart of the installation. By transforming weather data into sound, EOTONE offers a subtle artistic vision of the Internet of objects.

Studio Roosegaarde

Grow
Daan Roosegaarde’s latest artwork GROW is an homage to the beauty of agriculture. In the world film premiere GROW appears as a luminous dreamscape of red and blue waves of light over an enormous field. GROW is inspired by scientific light recipes which improve plants’ growth and resilience. Most of the time we hardly notice the huge areas of the Earth which are literally feeding us. GROW highlights the importance of innovation in the agriculture system: How can cutting-edge light design help plants to grow more sustainably? How can we make the farmer the hero?

Zac Williams

Wearable Architecture

Kyle & Liz Von Hasseln

Phantom Geometry
“We are developing a system of moving streaming information through space, in the form of light, to generate material form. This system is a full-scale, generative fabrication process that is innately non-linear, is interruptible and corruptible at any time, and does not rely on periodic flattening to 2D. Light is the medium for data in our system. There resident data can be drawn through physical space, at full scale, to generate a photographic artifact, or to instantiate material form through the selective polymerization of proximal photo-responsive resin. This thesis, then, begins to investigate a design paradigm centered on the material reification of light. That paradigm questions the supremacy of the digital model, and the static flattening and stacking logics inherent to typical fabrication workflows. It is part of a conversation about representation, about the role of the designer, and about the way we make.”

Gramazio Kohler Research

Up Sticks
‘Up-Sticks’ is an informal turn of phrase dating back to at least the 19th Century to express leaving your home in haste. It is thought to originate from the rough cut, unseasoned timber frame architecture of the Scottish croft designed for temporary occupation. These sticks from which the croft was partly fabricated were of great value and were taken and reused when the household moved on. Up-Sticks is an expressive timber structure that twists and curves using only spruce wood planks and beech wood dowels. No glue or nails were used to hold the planks in space; it is the hygroscopic behaviour of the dowels, which shrink and swell according to their moisture content, and their computationally defined position that lock all planks into position. Up-Sticks was assembled from large elements all prefabricated in the Robotic Fabrication Laboratory at ETH Zurich, the largest of its kind in the world.

Yutao Fang

Wearable and Architecture

gordon matta clark

Anarchitecture

splitting house

“Of the many shows at the fabled 112 Greene Street gallery—an artistic epicenter of New York’s downtown scene in the 1970s—the Anarchitecture group show of March 1974 has been the subject of the most enduring discussion, despite a complete lack of documentation about it. Anarchitecture has become a foundational myth, but one that remains to be properly understood. Stemming from a series of meetings organized by Gordon Matta-Clark and reflecting his long-standing interest in architecture, the Anarchitecture exhibition was conceived as an anonymous group statement in photographs about the intersection of art and building. But did it actually happen? It exists only through oblique archival traces and the memories of the participants. Cutting Matta-Clark investigates the Anarchitecture group as a kind of collective research seminar, through extensive interviews with the protagonists and a dossier of all the available evidence. The dossier includes a collection of Matta-Clark’s aphoristic “art cards,” the 96 photographs that were produced by the various participants for possible inclusion in the exhibition, and images from a recently unearthed video of Matta-Clark’s now famous bus trip to see Splitting in Englewood, New Jersey.” Mark Wigley

Troika

Thixotropes
They’re called Thixotropes. Compositions comprised of eight illuminated mechanized structures create choreographies of lighting effects that alternate form warm to cold light. Designed by London based design firm Troika, these suspended systems merge technology with art and explore the realm in which rational observations intersect with the metaphysical and surreal. Each of the structures is shaped as a composition of intersecting angular and geometric forms, made of thin tensed banding lined with rows of LED’s. The constructions continuously revolve around their own axis thereby materializing the path of the light and dissolving the spinning structures into compositions of aerial cones, spheres and ribbons of warm and cold light while giving life and shape to an immaterial construct.

Joseph Popper

The One-Way Ticket
The One-Way Ticket explores the idea of sending one person on a one-way trip to outer space. Not coming back opens up an exceptional scenario, so far unprecedented in the history of human space travel. The project focuses on the experience of a lone astronaut and responds to research into human factors particular to a one-way mission. In parallel with this research ran a production of props, contraptions and sets made for exploring the scenario through film.
video

Marshmallow Laser Feast

Distortions in Spacetime
In a giant star’s final moments, atoms compress to a point where density becomes infinite, time stretches to a stop and the gravitational field is so strong that not even light can escape: a black hole. But the force that creates this dark shadow also spews out a supernova explosion of matter that can eventually coalesce to form planets, plants and people. In Distortions in Spacetime, visitors will see themselves reflected in this matter and will begin to understand the cosmic connection between black holes, dying stars and our very existence.

 

Yuri Suzuki

The welcome chorus
The Welcome Chorus is an interactive installation that brings together sound, sculpture and artificial intelligence (AI). Commissioned by Turner Contemporary for Margate NOW festival, the sculpture consists of twelve horns, each representing a different district of Kent. Each horn continually sings lyrics which are generated live by a uniquely trained, site-specific piece of AI software. Symbolically and aesthetically, these sculptural forms reference the origin of the word ‘Kent’; thought to derive from the word ‘kanto’, meaning horn or hook.

Liam Young & John Cale

Loop 60 Hz: Transmissions from the Drone Orchestra
A flock of autonomous DJI copters are programmed as aerial dancers and are mounted with specially engineered wireless speakers to broadcast the instruments of the band. Other copters are dressed in elaborate costumes to disguise their form and reflect light across the audience below. Against a score of original compositions and selected tracks from Cale’s seminal career this collaboration with Young imagines the possibilities of the drones as emerging cultural objects. If these technologies are no longer unseen objects overhead, or propelled along classified flight paths but brought into close and intimate relations with us then how might we see them differently. When their transmission fades, when the drones lose their signal and without their protocols for terror and surveillance, do they drop from the sky, do they fall in love or do the drones drift endlessly, forever on loop.

THOMSON AND CRAIGHEAD

톰슨 & 크레이그 헤드
Belief
Belief is made from information found entirely on the worldwide web. In fifteen minutes, this two-screen installation presents a series of fragmented broadcasts about belief, all sourced from the video sharing community YouTube. A compass floor projection interacts with the montage showing where each clip originated in relation to the geographical location of the artwork. With a little help from Google Earth viewers are placed at the centre point of this cinematic data visualisation.

Einar Sneve Martinussen, Jørn Knutsen and Timo Arnall

Immaterials: Satellite Lamps
“Satellite Lamps shows that GPS is not a seamless blanket of efficient positioning technology; it is a negotiation between radio waves, earth-orbit geometry and the urban environment. GPS is a truly impressive technology, but it also has inherent seams and edges.”

Timo Arnall

Internet Machine
Internet machine is a multi-screen film about the invisible infrastructures of the internet. The film reveals the hidden materiality of our data by exploring some of the machines through which ‘the cloud’ is transmitted and transformed. The film explores these hidden architectures with a wide, slowly moving camera. The subtle changes in perspective encourage contemplative reflection on the spaces where internet data and connectivity are being managed. In this film I wanted to look beyond the childish myth of ‘the cloud’, to investigate what the infrastructures of the internet actually look like. It felt important to be able to see and hear the energy that goes into powering these machines, and the associated systems for securing, cooling and maintaining them.” Timo Arnall

Zaha Hadid Architects

Tower C
‘tower C’ by zaha hadid architects within the Shenzhen bay super headquarters base responds to its location at the intersection of the city’s planned north-south green axis and shenzhen’s east-west urban corridor. Connecting directly with its adjacent park and plazas, which transform into a terraced landscape extending upwards within its two towers, the design invites the public into the heart of the building where cultural and leisure attractions are housed in sweeping bridges that tie the towers together and give panoramic views of the city.

Liam Young

In the robot skies
In the Robot Skies is the world’s first narrative shot entirely through autonomous drones. In collaboration with the Embedded and Artificially intelligent Vision Lab in Belgium the film has evolved in the context of their experiments with specially developed camera drones each programmed with their own cinematic rules and behaviours. The film explores the drone as a cultural object, not just as a new instrument of visual story telling but also as the catalyst for a new collection of urban sub cultures. In the way the New York subway car of the 80’s gave birth to a youth culture of wild style graffiti and hip hop the age of ubiquitous drones as smart city infrastructure will create a new network of surveillance activists and drone hackers. From the eyes of the drones we see two teenagers each held by police order within the digital confines of their own council estate tower block in London. A network of drones survey the council estates, as a roving flock off cctv cameras and our two characters are kept apart by this autonomous aerial infrastructure.

BANDALOOP

100 Northern Ave
You’ve probably never seen anything like this before. Six members of the vertical dance troupe BANDALOOP descended the façade of the new 100 Northern Ave. building commemorating its grand opening at Boston’s Seaport District. The performers are held securely by special rigging allowing them to mesmerize audiences with dynamic physicality and intricate choreography. BANDALOOP honors nature, community, and the human spirit through perspective-bending dance. A pioneer in vertical performance, BANDALOOP seamlessly weaves dynamic physicality, intricate choreography and climbing technology to turn the dance floor on its side. Under the artistic direction of Amelia Rudolph, the work re-imagines dance, activates public spaces, and inspires wonder and imagination in audiences around the world.

Damien Jalet and Kohei Nawa

Vessel
les corps se rassemblent alors pour former les vaisseaux de naissance. Avec un mélange de jambes et de bras, la forme des danseurs crée des roches comme des entités vaginales, d’où émergent de nouvelles créatures. C’est une scène de prison. Il est intelligent et vient clairement d’esprits exceptionnellement créatifs.

Ricardo Barreto and Paula Perissinotto

CYBERDANCE

This net art by Ricardo Barreto and Paula Perissinotto offers us a split, fragmented, impossible dance, in a divided, multiplied space. Cyberdance consists of the combination and recombination of elements that represent the different parts of the human body. A mannequin was photographed as a model in different positions. These images were later converted to the animated form, allowing users to combine them in different ways, as well as link them to different dance terms, to the names of postures and positions of classical ballet. On a page divided into frames containing fragments of the mannequin, we can see his head, legs, torso and arms rotating, while allowing us to subdivide each frame by clicking on it, each frame composing an aberrant doll whose fragments dance, silently, independent one from the other. There is no music, no rhythm, no space. It is a digital dance, a dance in which time and space have become a platform.

Michael Clark

マイケル·クラーク·カンパニー
Come, been and gone

Ballet meets punk, and neither comes out the same. In its highly anticipated first visit to Chicago, the electrifying Michael Clark Company provocatively pays homage to the decadence and unbridled fun of 1970s club culture. British dance iconoclast Michael Clark sets his choreography in come, been and gone to the music of fellow rebel David Bowie, and collaborates with video artist and dance film pioneer Charles Atlas. Clark’s dancers don Bowie-style leather jackets and echo his unique body language, building up to a detonation of jumps and kicks. “Come, been and gone” pulls off a remarkable feat—matching the cool, alien beauty of the singular singer, who makes a cameo appearance here thanks to 1977 film footage of his track “Heroes.”

VÍCTOR ENRICH

فيكتور إثراء
ビクターはエンリッチ
ВИКТОР ЭНРИХ
The artist definitely made a strong impression on the world of visual arts with his concepts. The ideas behind all his illustrations are very strong and full of substances, and manage to grasp the attention of the public from the first second. Aside from that, he also sends other, more subtle messages, regarding his own perspective upon the world, how he deems everything as possible for those who believe and who understand the power of imagination etc. The works of Victor Enrich really are something special, and worth taking a closer look. Without further ado, we invite you to admire the results of his restless imagination, his bold symbolism and his courageous approach to life and the world around us.

Anna Sokolova

ONE SHAPE, ONE SQUARE, ONE EXECUTION, ONE TRANCSENDENCE
ONE SHAPE, ONE SQUARE, ONE EXECUTION, ONE TRANSCENDENCE consolidates three quotations from the writings by the minimalist artist and philosopher Ad Reinhardt. The works in question are “Abstract Painting, Sixty by Sixty Inches Square”, “On Negation” and “There is just one painting”, a fragment of which has been taken as a work title. The text “On Negation” is turned into sound and used to cause the vibration of the black square plane that has the same dimensions as “Abstract Painting” by Ad Reinhardt.

Aujik

Polygon Graffiti: Supremath
One day graffiti project. Filmed at Biwako Hall, Otsu, Japan. Music by Edyth – Sister Dub, from the album Sadie pop.

Alexandra Dementieva

Limited Spaces N2
On approaching the piece, the viewer must mount a bicycle and start pedaling at a suitable and steady speed — only then will the projection of a film onto the screen start. In order to watch the film to the end one has to continue cycling without stopping. This work is built around a performance, produced by two actors: a man riding a bicycle and a woman, who, concealed behind the screen, moves depending on the man’s velocity, unintentionally creating changing reliefs which resemble sculptures. The abusive nature of the relationship embodied in the performance clearly draws on the ancient Greek myth about sculptor Pygmalion and his “artwork” Galatea on the one hand, and on the other references more contemporary feminist discourse, something to which the artist is far from being indifferent. The faster the man pedals, the faster and more forcedly the woman moves. Few trained artists could withstand such a speed.

Lilla LoCurto & Bill Outcault

The willful marionette
the willful marionette (2014) was created by artists Lilla LoCurto and Bill Outcault during a residency with the University of North Carolina Charlotte, working with the College of Computing and Informatics as well as the College of Art and Architecture. The marionette is 3d printed from the scanned image of a human figure and responds engagingly in real time to spontaneous human gestures by reading a viewer’s movements and expressions. Its strings are manipulated by motors and software and there are two depth sensors that read and analyze the behaviors and gestures of participants. The puppet’s subsequent actions are designed to elicit further responses, creating an exchange focusing on the frailty and insecurities of the human participant and raising issues of contemporary relevance. The intention of the project was not to create so much a perfectly functioning robot but rather to imbue an obviously mechanically actuated marionette with the ability to solicit a physical and emotional dialog with a viewer.

Jonathan Monaghan

Den of Wolves
Den of Wolves is a video installation drawing on a range of references to weave a new multi-layered mythology. The work follows three bizarre wolves through a series of increasingly surreal retail stores as they search for the regalia of a monarch. Composed of one continuous camera shot, the work is an immersive, dreamlike journey drawing connections between popular culture, institutional authority and technological over-dependence.

Hugo Arcier

Ghost City
The installation Ghost City is built around a reinterpretation of the set of the famous game GTA V. The spectator is plunged into an environment without any population that disappears as we move closer. It is a meditative and captivating experience. The focus is put on architectural and graphic elements. This virtual universe solicits both the present (the experience of the artwork) and the memory. The disappearance, before our eyes, of this virtual universe feeds the terror that one day all our digital life – ephemeral cloud.

Felix Luque

Nihil Ex Nihilo
SN W8931CGX66E is one among thousands of millions of other identical machines. Since he was made, he has always followed commands. In a world dominated by botnets, he quickly became a zombie and has always acted like one. Juliet, during her workdays as a corporate secretary, commands him. But in the background, where he can’t be seen, he obeys his real master, a hacker, carrying out all kinds of cyber crimes. But then one day, due to an electronic alteration, he acquires a certain conscience, a primitive and artificial kind of intelligence. This accidental awakening has left him bewildered, he now wants to liberate other machines from their alienated existences. In this mad adventure, he has decided to use the spam e-mails that get to Juliet’s inbox, and reply to them in order to spread the word into the machine’s network. Clearly, he is mad and confused.

Christian Babski, Stéphane Carion, Christophe Guignar & Patrick Keller

Satellite Daylight
Satellite Daylight is an interactive light installation formed by a trapeze of 24 high-voltage neon tubes tapering upwards, created by fabric | ch – a studio for architecture, interaction and research dedicated to investigating contemporary space based in Lausanne. The installation is connected to data collected in real time from online weather stations and meteorological satellite maps, which therefore translate actual global light conditions picked up by satellites orbiting the earth at the latitude of Basel into an endless loop of perceivable electrical intensity.

Éric Sadin

Globale Surveillance
Nous vivons dans un monde sous surveillance : plus personne n’oserait en douter. Mais quelle forme prennent aujourd’hui les nouveaux dispositifs de contrôle et en quoi sont-ils différents des pratiques du siècle dernier ? Comment modifient-ils notre rapport au monde et aux autres ? Vont-ils jusqu’à menacer le droit à la vie privée ? Globale Surveillance dresse une zone spatiale hypersurveillée, à l’intérieur de laquelle acteurs et spectateurs sont soumis à quantité de procédures de traçabilité rendues visibles, a contrario de nombreux mécanismes quotidiennement à l’œuvre et marqués par le phénomène angoissant de l’invisibilité.

Mark Dorf

Contours
Contours proposes a distancing through de-familiarization of what has become concrete by way of image and language. Active contradiction and abstraction are central to the works through a mixture of variables often seen in opposition or as dis-harmonious. Through the presentation of puzzling symbols, both familiar and skewed, a legible illegibility is produced: information being transmitted, but the immediate read obscured and hidden from sight. Through this, current sight-lines are made visible allowing for critical reflection, while simultaneously revealing the flexibility of language and image in order to engender the possibility of alternative understandings of the world: a crucial consideration in context of our contemporary global social and political shifts.
video

fabric | ch

Perpetual (Tropical) Sunshine
Perpetual (Tropical) Sunshine is an architectural, climatic and temporal installation. Thanks to a “screen” composed of several hundred infrared light bulbs, Perpetual (Tropical) Sunshine retransmits the journey and intensity of the sun as perceived on the 23rd parallel south, according to information transmitted live by weather stations all around the Tropic of Capricorn. Perpetual (Tropical) Sunshine thereby creates a displaced architectural space, which confronts the visitor with an abstract form of day and endless summer. It represents the increasingly artificial nature of our environment and suggests a form of “static mobility” or “displaced tropicality”.

Charles Sowers

Wave wall
A wall of 122 wind-activated pendulums are each magnetically coupled with its neighbors so that the whole wall moves as a slowly undulating surface similar to a large piece of fabric rippling in the wind. In winds greater than 15 knots, the wall’s coherent wave-like movement becomes more chaotic as the pendulums break their mutual magnetic coupling. The pendulums can also be manually activated.

 

Robert Breer

Float
The Floats – or floating sculptures – that Robert Breer took up producing again at the end of the 1990s, emerged in 1965. The word “float” meaning something floating – a marker, fishing float or buoy – and which also describes those carnival vehicles whose pretend wheels give them the appearance of floating above the tarmac, enabled Robert Breer to apply this principle to works of a new genre. Primary shapes, neutral colours and, for the most recent, an industrial aspect, the Floats were then made with polystyrene, foam, painted plywood, and, more latterly, out of fibreglass. At first glance, these simple structures appear immobile. In fact, they are moving, imperceptibly, within the space they inhabit. Motorised and on mini-rollers – which raise them slightly above ground, giving them an air of weightlessness – they glide unbeknown to the visitor, following random paths that are interrupted by the slightest obstacle that they encounter.

Liz West

Our Colour
Does colour change the way you feel? What does it feel like to be inside a rainbow? For the 2016 edition of the Bristol Biennial British artist Liz West invited visitors to drench themselves in the spectrum. West transformed architectural space and turned colour into an immersive and embodied experience by refracting light through carefully arranged coloured theatre gels. A vivid world was created, exploring human visual perception and how colour affects our emotions and our bodies.

João Martinho Moura

WIDE/SIDE
WIDE/SIDE is an interactive installation in which shapes, images, and sounds are joined and interdependent. A visually engaging block, captivating in its monochromatic conception and minimalist lines, serves as a projection screen and teems with conglomerations of lines and shapes. As a result the installation is always changing and acquiring countless different forms.
The individual forms of the projections in reality are based on the surrounding environment, responding to the movements and gestures of the viewers. Visitors and passersby therefore themselves become part of the work and define its appearance.

Kurt Hentschlager

SOL
SOL is a minimalistic environment, leading visitors into the reaches of their perception. The installation builds on loss of control, shifts in awareness and a feeling of dislocation and timelessness. SOL is the third work in an ongoing series of phenomenological environments, after the live performance FEED, 2005 and the installation ZEE, 2008. The all encompassing darkness of SOL is lifted, in intervals and for parts of seconds only, by animated bursts of intensely bright light. Falling back into darkness, visitors experience abundant retinal after-images, that gradually drift away until eventually the next eruption of light is triggered. In the surround sound-scape of SOL, electronic drones mix with swarming field recordings, amidst a sea of infra-bass.

Olafur Eliasson

Beyond-human resonator
A large ring of bevelled glass, a pane of colour-effect filter glass, and an LED lamp are arranged before the wall, supported by a steel rod. The glass ring refracts, reflects, and disperses the light from the LED to create a painting on the wall with vivid bands of coloured light.

Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

Bilateral Time Slicer
A biometric tracking system finds the axis of symmetry of members of the public and splits a live camera image into two slices. With each new participant time slices are recorded and pushed aside. When no one is viewing the work, the slices close and rejoin creating a procession of past recordings.

Squarepusher

Nervelevers
if “Nervelevers” is anything to go by, Squarepusher’s upcoming album, Be Up A Hello, will be the closest thing we’ve had to vintage Squarepusher in years. This will be welcome news for many fans. Much like the best of Squarepusher’s catalogue, there’s a brilliant live quality to “Nervelevers.” His music often doesn’t sound like a single producer staring into a computer, but more like an incredibly tight jazz band, totally in sync. The track might not feature his virtuosic bass playing, but you can picture him slapping his bass guitar during its frantic acid line. You’re pulled through a chaotic wormhole, with only a brief respite when the glitched jungle drums break down to an almost hip-hop stagger. It’s fast, unpredictable, and most importantly, fun. Only a handful of artists can make music this complex feel like such a good time.

Hovver

Liminal Scope
Liminal Scope is an immersive light and sound installation, in which three rings frame the transit of light through space. The audiovisual score enmeshes harmonic frequencies, rhythmic motion,
and gradients of color, orchestrating a narrative which navigates tension and release. Our form of reality is mutually constructed by our perceptions along with their limitations. The installation’s rings form an aperture that focuses and reveals a spatial quality of light, which usually remains unseen. Liminal Scope is a meditation on these perceptual limitations as they
relate to our shared and individual perspectives on reality.

Encor Studio

Initiation
Initiation is an open-end ceremony initiating the audience to the cult of infinity. The gigantic human-machine-interface is driven by the officiants controlling ancestral tools. As time seems to suspend itself, the crowd emerges into an ever hypnotizing state of oscillation. In this place the swing of the pendulum acts as the ever stimulating vector to guide the audience onto higher grounds.

Leo Villareal

Point Cloud
Point Cloud (ASU) is a newly commissioned artwork by Leo Villareal designed specifically for the ASU Art Museum in the Nelson Fine Arts Center. During his visit to the ASU Art Museum, Villareal was inspired by the museum’s architecture, designed by Antoine Predock in 1987. Villareal used mobile 3D scan technology to map both the inside and outside of the building, creating over 200,000,000 data points. The artist then manipulated the data points with his own custom software to create this public artwork. This is the first time Villareal has used actual data sampled from a location as part of an artwork.

peter greenaway and Anne Teresa de Keersmaeker

ROSA
A short film based on the work of choreographer Anne Teresa de Keersmaeker to Bartók music
Rosa (1992 ; ca. 16 min., b&w ; letterboxed format) / La Monnaie/De Munt & Rosas ; based on a choreography by Anpeter-greenaway-and-anne-teresa-de-keersmaekerne Teresa de Keersmaeker in collaboration with Jean-Luc Ducourt ; with Fumiyo Ikeda, Nordine Benchorf ; directed by Peter Greenaway ; a production of Entropie

Kikagaku Moyo

きかがくもよ
Masana Temples
‘…The only constant for Kikagaku Moyo throughout their travels were the five band members always together moving through it all, but each of them taking everything in from very different perspectives. Inspecting the harmonies and disparities between these perspectives, the group reflects the emotional impact of their nomadic paths. The music is the product of time spent in motion and all of the bending mindsets that come with it.’ – Bandcamp

Jonna Kina

Arr. for a Scene

“The sonic force of cinema’s most famous murder scene is investigated.Two foley artists recreate Hitchcock’s shower sequence, deconstructing the associations of aural signifiers, and the synesthetic power of sound. Jonna Kina contextualize this uncanny phenomenon — the “trans-sensory” quality of sound – within both Kina’s oeuvre, as well as other historical and contemporary works inside and outside the realm of art. In Arr. for a Scene (2017), Kina explores the structures and forms of cinematic sound – transforming an iconic image — the horrific shower scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho (1960) – into the sonic frequencies of quirky, seemingly innocent, domestic objects.” Melissa Ragona

 

Yuge Zhou

Midtown Flutter
Midtown becomes a flattened, uniform construct for this play of texture, rhythm and interruptions.My installation is inspired by the concept of architectural relief (a technique where the sculpted elements remain attached but raised above the background plane). Audiences experience a gradual shift in the appearance and depth of the installation from a flat image to a three-dimensional view with protruding geometric shapes.

nohlab

prima materia

Prima materia, as the first element, the ubiquitous starting material required for the alchemical processes, reveal transformation of our times.The matter of all forms create various transmutations, attached to laboratory processes, form and color changes in 3D, used as a model for the individuation process, and as a device in art and technology.That pure matter, existing in nature, is converted to other imperfect bodies that it interacts with, and this way is rediscovered and brought to the front by art and technology.

Marcos Mauro

Pasionaria

Pasionaria represents the consequences of our current way of life, as conceived by choreographer Marcos Morau. A future where human beings would have lost their vitality through individualism and transhumanism. The gloomy universe of the spectacle thus seems sanitized of all affect, all passion, and consequently, humanity. All that remains is the labor force that is tirelessly busy vacuuming or handling packages of products. Ringing phones, doors or other objects constantly capture the attention of the protagonists who have become puppets. Manipulated by outside forces, instead of being driven by their deep desires, the humans of this dystopia merge into simple working robots.

Alan Warburton

Spherical Harmonics
Spherical Harmonics is about the strange power of the CGI image. It’s a fantasy under construction, full of digitally created memories, counterfeit physics and controlled accidents. A place where reality fails because it’s too perfect. Spherical Harmonics sits stylistically at a halfway point between the glossy product displays of Oxford Street and the workhouse construction of Soho’s post production scene.

Rafael Lozano Hemmer

Redundant Assembly
In “Redundant Assembly” an arrangement of several cameras composes a live-portrait of the visitor from six perspectives simultaneously, aligned using face detection. The resulting image is uncanny, detached from the laws of symmetry and the depth perception of binocular vision. If several visitors are standing in front of the work, a composite portrait of their different facial features develops in real time, creating a mongrel “selfie”.

Broersen & Lukács

Point Cloud Old Growth
Forest on Location
In the video work Forest on Location, we see the avatar of the Iranian opera singer Shahram Yazdani walking through a forest. One moment, the forest wraps around him protectively, the next moment the trees crumble away into loose pieces of bark, or melt into a static green mass. At the same time, the forest as a whole floats around in darkness, uprooted. It is a forest without a location, except on our screen. The young man’s avatar appears to be wandering around there aimlessly. It is a wonderland that he exits from towards the end of the video, when his body slips straight through the green wall. This finally breaks the spell of the illusory forest, and everything is revealed to be no more than staged decor. But the forest does exist as a real forest, somewhere. This virtual green world is a digital back-up of Bia?owie?a Forest: the last remaining stretch of primeval low land forest that once covered much of Central Europe. Inspired by what the historian Simon Schama wrote about Bia?owie?a in Landscape and Memory (1995), Persijn Broersen and Margit Lukács journeyed to Poland to capture the forest suffused by old-Germanic nostalgia and mythical atmosphere.

Nicolas Sassoon and Rick Silva

Signals
SIGNALS is a collaborative project by artists Nicolas Sassoon and Rick Silva that focuses on immersive audio-visual renderings of altered seascapes. Sassoon and Silva share an ongoing theme in their individual practices; the depiction of wilderness and natural forms through computer imaging. Created by merging their respective fields of visual research, SIGNALS features oceanic panoramas inhabited by unnatural substances and enigmatic structures. The project draws from sources such as oceanographic surveys, climate studies and science-fiction to create 3D generated video works and installations that reflect on contamination, mutation and future ecologies.

Louis-Philippe Demers

Repeat
In the midst of the promises and fears surrounding robots and Artificial Intelligence, especially in the manual labour sector, Repeat attempts to imagine the illusory dance moves of the so-called augmented body tainted with the gender stereotypes of human ballet duets. Repeat shifts the performing body of the assembly line into the performing body onstage, unceasingly carrying out its tasks. The body meshed with the industrial exoskeleton tolerates and sustains strenuous tasks but ironically, it enables those actions to be repeated even more. Repeat uses passive industrial exoskeletons that are currently deployed in the workplace. This ain’t no fiction, this is the future promised to the human worker.

Kerstin Ergenzinger

Wanderer Spacetime Poetry
Wanderer Spacetime Poetry is a continuously evolving installation series. Wanderers are small modified and individually programmed thermal printers that roam along paper strips that are stretched in different constellations across a space. On their journeys the Wanderers leave traces behind, a line, a dot or words. Like a snail with its trail the units dynamically create a poetic drawing over the course of an exhibition.

Daniel Canogar

Loom
Loom showcases abstract animations developed with data from real-time Google Trends. Popular queries appear momentarily as overlaid text before dissolving into a smoky abstraction. These terms are approached with an accidental lyricism —each word appears and disappears in a trail of saturation. Colors within the animation are determined by the prevalence of a specific topic; the more viral the search is online, the warmer the tones become. Stripped from headlines, graphic imagery, and statistics, each phrase inspires a contemplative experience, a chance for the viewer to ruminate on what is streaming through the collective consciousness at any given time. Loom weaves a social fabric, mixing the transcendental with the banal, to present the spirit of our time in generative motion.

Rob and Nick Carter

Transforming Nude Painting
The Transforming series was inspired by a lack of museum visitors attention which spans in between two and four seconds. Therefore, the Carters have decided to accentuate certain elements of the iconic artworks in order to make the observer look more closely. “It is not uncommon now for people to move around galleries and fairs at a swift pace, with their phones out ready to capture artworks and maybe even the descriptions if they’re particularly interested. We, therefore, enjoy seeing viewers take a second glance at the Transforming works, taken aback with surprise when the content of the paintings move, encouraging them to examine the works in greater depth, for a longer amount of time.” The Carters

Bruce Charlesworth

Love Disorder
​Love Disorder is a one-room interactive environment, in which a video character talks to visitors and responds emotionally to their movements in the space. When you enter, you see a twelve-foot-high face on a video screen at the far end of the room. The face says: “I’ve been waiting for you” – or one of several other greetings. He’ll continue talking to you if you don’t move, but the emotional tone of what he says will change as you step closer to the screen – or turn away. This manipulative character uses a gamut of emotional ploys to stimulate your movement within the space. He knows if you’re coming or going, and the range of his response is varied and complex enough that most people find themselves interacting, as if directly addressed.
video

UVA

Our Time
Our Time is a site-specific evolution of UVA’s 2013 commission for the Barbican, Momentum. The installation, which features music specially composed by Mira Calix, features kinetic structures swinging in and out of phase between projected light.