Cassie Mcquarter

Halo
In these six animated paintings presented as a single channel video, the artist reenacts situations and motifs from the first-person shooter series Halo and the erotic videogame Dream Stripper. Conceived as a dynamic, virtual collage, HALO shows short stock animation loops of characters dying over and over, with koi, dining chairs, asteroids, guns, flowers, torches, pinball machines, candles, and discarded pillows floating around them, creating a hypnotic motion.

Jennifer Steinkamp

From, the Future
The art is about waiting, something the entire world population knows since the onslaught of Covid-19. The title was also inspired by a dream where I told a scientist I was from the future and he believed me. My interpretation of the dream relates to my interest in the luminous thoughts of the 13th-century Persian poet Rumi, he clearly describes what our souls really are, beautiful, sacred, beyond time. I am fascinated by the existential impermanence of beauty. Beauty offers us a deep connection to the experience of life. The animation consists of cut flowers continuously falling from the sky, it can be seen by looking up to the ceiling. The title infers the signature on the note of a gift.

Michael Candy

Synthetic Pollenizer
The Synthetic Pollenizer project Intervenes in real-world ecological systems using robotic flowers to Integrate in the reproductive cycle of local flora, these imitations offer a manufactured nectar supplement while attaching locally harvested pollen to bees.

Isabella Münnich

Immersed Garden
Immersed Garden is in its true sense a sunken world. Floating bodiless in an underwater garden, natural sounds guide you through an immersive surrounding, somewhere between calming and irritating, natural and artificial. It is a playful exploration of the individual conception of safety and confusion and a personal approach to aesthetic references to habits of introspection and retreat in digital environments. It was created by fusing different digital processes like photogrammetry of selected natural places around Karlsruhe and field recordings in a local natural reserve. Underwater videos hybridize with 3D scans of trees and plants while invisible frogs are croaking and humming birds are buzzing by synthetic flowers. The artistic aim was to explore the personal perception of calming and irritating, playing with the concept of immaterialness and attentiveness. The artwork creates aesthetic references to philosophical and scientific theories of introspection and identity.

Lisa Park

Blooming
“Blooming” is an interactive audiovisual installation that highlights the importance of human connection. It takes the form of a life-size 3D Cherry blossom tree, which is a common symbol of social ties and transience of life in East Asian culture. As a response to participants’ skin-to-skin contacts, heart rate, and gestures, “Blooming” blossoms according to their intimacy. As audience members hold hands or embrace, the digital Cherry tree flowers bloom and scatter. When they let go off their physical contacts, the flower return to its pre-bloom state. The color of the flowers turns white or red based on participants’ heart rate as they interact with each other. (the faster the heart rate, the redder the tonality; the slower the heart rate, the whiter the tonality). In addition to the visual responses, sounds are also modulated according to the tree’s different stages: pre-bloom, blooming, petals falling.

Kimchi and chips

Halo
99 robotic mirrors continuously move throughout the day to follow the sun like sunflowers. These mirrors, arrayed across two 5 meter tall towers and one 15 meter long track, each emit a beam of sunlight into a cloud of water mist. The beams are computationally aligned so that together they draw a bright circle in the air. Dependent entirely on the presence of the sun for its completion, the work explores the possibilities and limitations of technology to capture what is out of reach, to harness nature and bring the sun down to earth. Collaborating with the natural fluctuations in the climate, Halo appears only for moments when the wind, sun, water, and technology coincide, creating a form which exists between the material and immaterial.

NICK KNIGHT

ニックナイト
НИК НАЙТ
ניק נייט
닉 나이트
Nick Knight is one of the most sought after fashion and editorial photographers in the world today. His first photographs however were focused on an entirely different field. In the 1970s, he took a documentary approach in recording the Skinhead movement popular among youths at that time. He also has a keen interest in pressed flowers and plants

Cho Gi Seok

“I will always focus on portraits. My aim is to try to express the characteristics of Seoul and my generation in my work.” In terms of visual motifs, Giseok’s portfolio features a few consistent elements. Firstly, a soft use of light, often accompanied by washes of colour. And, secondly, flowers of all shapes and sizes. These form a large part of Giseok’s compositions, dictating the aura of an image.
Styled by: Hyunji Shi.

lauren dimaya krystal li heidy cordero arias

every time the stars align
FILE LED SAO PAULO 2018
“Every Time the Stars Align” fuses different natural elements of crystals, plasma and flowers in a lava lamp environment. Red crystals freeze with rigid edges and thaws into a relaxing mood. Plasma liquid rises and falls reflecting a lava-like quality. Flowers fluctuate between a spectrum of color symbolizing intense human affections. Contradicting and uniting flat and deep spaces, the three elements compose and decompose.

Carl Kleiner

Карлом Кляйнером
Tulips Postures
Carl Kleiner creates sleek editorial content for fashion and lifestyle brands, and that sensibility shows in his photo and video series Postures which features artfully arranged tulips. Using minimal metal rods, bent at strategic ends and angles, Kleiner showcases the graceful curves of the flowers’ long necks and gently ruffled petals and leaves. A further sense of movement is instilled through the stop-motion video, which combines still photos of the blossoms’ subtle changes into a dramatic dance.

teamlab

チームラボ
floating flower garden

“Much as Random International’s “Rain Room” allowed visitors to walk through the rain without getting wet, “Floating Flower Garden” is designed so that viewers can walk through a hanging garden without getting … flowered. Sensors that detect an approaching viewer cause flowers in that viewer’s vicinity to rise.” Kriston Capps

Joy Division

The Eternal
[Verse 1]
Procession moves on, the shouting is over
Praise to the glory of loved ones now gone
Talking aloud as they sit round their tables
Scattering flowers washed down by the rain
Stood by the gate at the foot of the garden
Watching them pass like clouds in the sky
Try to cry out in the heat of the moment
Possessed by a fury that burns from inside
[Verse 2]
Cry like a child, though these years make me older
With children my time is so wastefully spent
A burden to keep, though their inner communion
Accept like a curse an unlucky deal
Played by the gate at the foot of the garden
My view stretches out from the fence to the wall
No words could explain, no actions determine
Just watching the trees and the leaves as they fall

Kapwani Kiwanga

Flowers for Africa
Flowers For Africa the artist mined archives related to African de-colonization to compile a list of flowers associated with individuals, nations and/or resistance movements; an image library that became the basis for meticulous sculptural recreations of individual flowers, or entire bouquets. As Kapwani described of the series, in a statement that reads as apt in relation to her overall approach: “What I’m trying to do is to acquaint myself with these various historic times, and questions, and more generally an interest I have in power dynamics. With this project I have chosen to look from the African continent at these global questions of power dynamics. This project is a way for me to acquaint myself with different archives, consulting documents and simply pondering on those moments. In this process, this was the most natural gesture which emerged”

Daikoku Design Institute

The Petal Room
The Petal Room consists of 3,500 real flowers, 6 million paper petals designed to fall with beautiful trajectories, a signature scent, and sensor-activated lighting that incorporates microscopic scans of flowers. These elements stimulate the senses and allow visitors to feel physically connected to flowers and nature.

Cornelia Parker

War Room
“There were poppies as far as the eye could see,” says Cornelia Parker RA of her recent trip to Aylesford in Kent. But she is not talking about real flowers. She is recalling a visit to the village’s huge factory that produces paper poppies for Remembrance Day. This led to her new work War Room (2015, above), on view as part of her survey show at the newly refurbished Whitworth Gallery in Manchester.

George Balanchine

The Nutcracker
Waltz of the Flowers
New York City Ballet

“You don’t think of choreographers as mathematicians — yet group dances involve arithmetic and geometry. Nobody mastered those aspects of the art more brilliantly than George Balanchine.
See what he does with the “Waltz of the Flowers” in “The Nutcracker,” as in this short detail:As it begins, 14 women, arrayed in four rows, face front. The two demi-soloists start: They dance from our right to left, with two turning jumps at the end of the phrase. Then a row of four women behind them take up the same phrase — but now the first two women repeat the phrase in the opposite direction, from left to right.It’s like seeing screens sliding in opposite directions. Then the next row takes it up; then the next; suspense and excitement build. It’s an accumulating canon — not spread out across the stage but at close quarters”. Alastair Macaulay

HARUKA KOJIN

Over the past few years she has been part of exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Tokyo, Museu de Arte Moderna in Sao Paulo, the Soka Art Center in Taipei, and the Singapore Art Museum. In her series of works entitled reflectwo (2006–11), Kojin uses brightly colored plasticized fabric flowers to create a sense of disorientation by the use of mirror effects.

RUUD VAN EMPEL

루드 반 엠펠
Рууд ван Эмпель

Van Empel’s working method is a complex one. He photographs 4 or 5 professional models in his studio, and takes many series of detailed photos of leaves, flowers, plants and animals. Having gathered hundreds of pictures in a database, he selects those images with which he can achieve the best results. The models are mixed in the Photoshop program, clothes are photographed separately on a tailor’s dummy. In this way he creates new images of mainly children, black or white, set in a paradisaical environment.

Claudia Hart

Mortifications
Hart’s work is symbolist and poetic, not really narrative, but vaguely so, and is mesmerizing, hypnotic and formalist. Bodies or natural forms like flowers always appear in it. Hart calls her work, “post photography,” and has created a body of theoretic writings and exhibitions based on this concept The things in her worlds are generated from computer models instead of captured with a camera.

Jennifer Steinkamp

Jennifer Steinkamp uses computer animation to create video projections and immersive installations, dynamic works that explore the relationship between architectural space, motion, and perception. When projected, Steinkamp’s dimensionally modeled images create the illusion of receding space, generating a dialogue with the real space occupied by the viewer. Steinkamp’s imagery ranges from abstract undulating forms to subjects drawn from nature, such as the cascade of flowers in her 2008 series, “It’s a nice day for a white wedding.”

Rebecca Louise Law

The Hated Flower
Rebecca Louise Law is a London-based installation artist known for her transformation of spaces using hundreds or thousands of suspended flowers. Trained in fine art at Newcastle University in England, Law has been working with natural materials for 17 years, a practice that involves a constant exploration of relationships between nature and humans. Over the past few years she has worked in numerous public spaces, museums, and galleries, and has been commissioned by brands like Hermes, Cartier and Gucci.

MICHAEL BUHLER-ROSE

Camphor Flame on Pedestal
Michael Bühler-Rose’s practices on multiple platforms influence his production as an artist. He has described his subjects as “theatrical cultural realities” and “feats of representation through place and displacement.” Bühler-Rose uses western painting styles: still lifes, landscapes, portraits, to play with previous political notions of Hindu and Indic aesthetics: representations of gods and goddesses, incense, flowers, or the saris or bharatnaytam outfits worn by young women of European descent who live in a Hindu community in Florida.

TAKASHI MURAKAMI

تاكاشي موراكامي
村上隆
טקאשי מורקאמי
무라카미 다카시
Такаши Мураками

The works of Japanese artist Takashi Murakami have inspired both admiration and confusion. Inspired primarily by anime, Japanese animation, and manga, Japanese comics, Murakami’s paintings and sculptures feature bright, candy-colored images of cartoon-like characters, with large eyes and exaggerated body parts. His works are often decorated with smiling flowers, round, blinking eyes, and colorful mushrooms. Murakami’s creations defy traditional classifications, breaking down numerous barriers.

Luca Francesconi

pane pane pane vino canale di scolo
Working with materials often sourced from the artist’s immediate environment such as stones, shells, vegetables, flowers but also dried fishes or reptiles, LUCA FRANCESCONI holds an intense fascination with the natural world and the countless manifestations of human culture within it. Uniting organic, artistic, and technological forms, FRANCESCONI makes the relationships between natural, found and modified forms imprecise while liberating marginalized materials and narratives.

JON SHIREMAN

Broken Flower
Liquid Nitrogen

Throughout his career, Shireman has maintained a connection with flowers in decay; in other still lifes, he has cataloged the wilting of tulips and mums. This series, unlike those previous, is brutal and instantaneous. Where his other flowers underwent a slow, gradual death, these broken flowers are quickly frozen and violently ruptured. The process captured here is not a natural one but one that necessitates the use of a manmade element.

MARIA FERNANDA CARDOSO

Emu Flag
The reproductive organs of insects come in all different shapes and are actually quite beautiful. Some look like intricate flowers, others like exotic coral. Most look as though they belong to the biology of some distant planet. Maria Fernanda Cardoso has made her fascination with the natural sciences the basis of her art for many years, with the help of her husband and artistic collaborator Ross Harley.

AZUMA MAKOTO

あずままこと
אזאמה מקוטו
아즈마 마코토
Адзума Макото
Makoto is not your average, vase-based gypsophila arranger – he’s worked with Dior, Helmut Lang, Hermès and even Lego. One large-scale work is called Green Dog House. Another is Botanical Ashtray. ‘I’m focused on elevating the value of flowers and plants by expressing their unique forms. I convert the beauty of nature into artwork.’

Philippe Genty

Lands End
Inner Landscapes is a poetry odyssey for seven actors and dancers. They travel across Philippe Genty’s memories and dreams: they fly, speak with giant flowers, hatch from a shifting ground, dance with a moon. more

EGLE RAKAUSKAITE

The screw

Egle Rakauskaite is a leading Lithuanian artist, prominent on the world scene for her highly individual and memorable works. Born in 1967, she studied painting at Vilnius Academy of Arts and graduated in 1993. Described by critic Lolita Jablonskiene as “a unique artist, who does not follow any current trends of Lithuanian art”, Rakauskaite works in various media (video, performance, photography, making objects), free to associate and assemble them in different configurations as the project demands.In the early years of her career, she made objects out of unconventional and perishable materials such as chocolate, jasmine flowers, human hair, honey and fat. As she states, “these materials were used to protest against paint and canvas. Many critics attributed this interest in unconventional materials and also some of the images I constructed to my interest in feminist art. However, I think that at present the differences between male and female creation are not that visible any more. It is important that the art work opens itself to the consciousness and sub-consciousness of the viewer”.

CECELIA WEBBER

flowers series

NICK KNIGHT

ニックナイト
НИК НАЙТ
ניק נייט
닉 나이트
Nick Knight is one of the most sought after fashion and editorial photographers in the world today. His first photographs however were focused on an entirely different field. In the 1970s, he took a documentary approach in recording the Skinhead movement popular among youths at that time. He also has a keen interest in pressed flowers and plants

BYOUNGHO KIM

БЙОНХО КИМУ
White Flowers

OLAF BREUNING

BOOBS & FLOWERS

JEEYOUNG LEE

Джи Янг Ли
resurrection

Lotus flowers grow from the impure mud to reach for the light and bloom to the rise and fall of the sun; in Asia, it bears various cultural symbolisms such as prospects and rebirth. It is also known for its purifying function. The presence of the artist in the heart of such flower is meant to convey her personal experience. “I was born again by overcoming negative elements that had dragged me down and cleansed myself emotionally. The figure within a lotus blooming implies a stronger self who was just born again and is facing a new world”. It is this is very moment when one reaches maturity and full-potential that Lee illustrates in “Resurrection”, and, more generally speaking, throughout the entirety of her corpus.

JENNIFER STEINKAMP

Street Views

Jennifer Steinkamp uses computer animation to create video projections and immersive installations, dynamic works that explore the relationship between architectural space, motion, and perception. When projected, Steinkamp’s dimensionally modeled images create the illusion of receding space, generating a dialogue with the real space occupied by the viewer. Steinkamp’s imagery ranges from abstract undulating forms to subjects drawn from nature, such as the cascade of flowers in her 2008 series, “It’s a nice day for a white wedding.”

FULVIO BONAVIA

ФУЛЬВИО БОНАВИА
scent of flowers

HELEN CHADWICK

海伦查德威克
ヘレン·チャドウィック
헬렌 채드윅
Хелен Чедвик
Piss Flowers
What will you do if it snows this winter? Throw snowballs? Get out the sledge? Or wee in the crisp cold whiteness as art? Helen Chadwick had an eye for the organic. She took closeup photographs of moist, freshly cut meat, superimposed images of her body cells over landscapes, and invented a unique winter methodology to create her Piss Flowers. Chadwick urinated in deep snow, then made casts of the interior spaces – instant caves – melted in the snow by the warm liquid. The resulting white forms of bronze and cellulose lacquer look like alien cities from a frozen planet, or fungal eruptions beneath the surface of the arctic ice. They are unique and haunting winter wonderlands.

NAJA & DEOSTOS

ECTOPLASMATIC HOUSING
File Festival
‘Ectoplasmatic Housing’ aims to speculate about how architecture can mediate the pervasiveness of the contemporary ‘infocalypse’ age. An architectural experiment of physical and digital space through the use of interactive design and augmented reality.

Browsing through a domestic safari of Trojan savannas or sterilised virus forests while contemplating the emergence of thousands of cheap-friends-facebook flowers blossoming among the pulsating cocoons of dying obsolete apps… Quantum reality theories are ripe for the picking from wiki branches of tweeting pink daily hit dwarfing trees…
Ectoplasmatic Housing aims to speculate about how architecture can mediate the pervasiveness of the contemporary ‘infocalypse’ age. It cultivates data for a spatial interactive second nature manifestation. It grows, blossoms, dies and haunts. Overlayed with the physical this unstable ectoplasmatic nature may shift radically into a rapid nuke ecology of nightmares.

NICK KNIGHT

ニックナイト
НИК НАЙТ
ניק נייט
닉 나이트
Nick Knight is one of the most sought after fashion and editorial photographers in the world today. His first photographs however were focused on an entirely different field. In the 1970s, he took a documentary approach in recording the Skinhead movement popular among youths at that time. He also has a keen interest in pressed flowers and plants

FONG QI WEI

퐁 치 웨이
Exploded Flowers

MICHAEL WESELY

flowers

LI HONGBO

لى هونغبو
李洪波
Ли Хунбо
Ocean of Flowers

ROBERT BUELTEMAN

electrocuted flowers (photography kirlian)

BILLY KIDD

比利·基德
portrait flowers