THOM KUBLI

FILE SAO PAULO 2017
BLACK HOLE HORIZON
The nucleus of the installation is the invention of an apparatus resembling a ship horn. With the sounding of each tone, a huge soap bubble emerges from the horn. It grows while the tone sounds, peels off the horn, lingers through the exhibition space and finally bursts at an erratic position within the room.

Baumgartner + Uriu Architecture

Supermassive Black Holes
Supermassive Black Holes is an acoustic ceiling installation for the main lobby of the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce. The design is part of a series of projects in which we work with small primitives that are aggregated into a larger whole. In this case, there are over 10,000 felt cones stitched together into three gigantic, 20’ tall, hanging felt vortexes that that absorb sound through its materiality and geometry. The thousands of cone shape parts trap and disperse sound waves while softening the overall acoustic quality of the space.

Schweigman & en Cocky Eek

Spectrum
How intensely can you experience colour? Colour as a phenomenon which you don’t just see, but which totally absorbs… Spectrum is a spatial installation that makes colour tactile and tangible.
Fall backwards into a black hole and reawaken in an infinite spectrum. An immersive experience which will give you a whole new perspective on the coloured cycles of our everyday light. Following Blaas and Curve, Spectrum completes a triptych centred on white space, each piece created with spatial designer Cocky Eek in collabaration with Schweigman&. In Blaas you crawl through an inflatable balloon; in Curve you enter an endlessly spiralling tunnel. Spectrum starts by asking: how can we make the colour physically tangible?

Marshmallow Laser Feast

Distortions in Spacetime
In a giant star’s final moments, atoms compress to a point where density becomes infinite, time stretches to a stop and the gravitational field is so strong that not even light can escape: a black hole. But the force that creates this dark shadow also spews out a supernova explosion of matter that can eventually coalesce to form planets, plants and people. In Distortions in Spacetime, visitors will see themselves reflected in this matter and will begin to understand the cosmic connection between black holes, dying stars and our very existence.

 

The End of Time

TIMELAPSE OF THE FUTURE: A Journey to the End of Time
We start in 2019 and travel exponentially through time, witnessing the future of Earth, the death of the sun, the end of all stars, proton decay, zombie galaxies, possible future civilizations, exploding black holes, the effects of dark energy, alternate universes, the final fate of the cosmos.

Anish Kapoor

阿尼什•卡普尔
アニッシュ·カプーア
АНИШ КАПУР
Descension
A pool of dark water swirls in a terrifying spiral, never stopping, never emitting light. It looks black and bottomless. It is the whirlpool to end all whirlpools – a spooky mixture of the vortex that sucked down the Pequod and an illustration from Stephen Hawking’s latest work on black holes. Yet this awe-inspiring phenomenon is an exhibit in an art gallery – the latest sublime spectacle from Anish Kapoor.

DAN CORSON

Empyrean Passage

Empyrean Passage is reminiscent of both a theoretical black hole and portal into the celestial worlds. Empyrean (notice the pyre in the word) is the final and fiery level of heaven as depicted by Dante- or aether in Aristotle’s cosmology. The form is constructed like a giant hoopskirt and gracefully moves in the wind creating a gossamer lighting effect overhead. While this project is an oculus to the heavens, more focus is usually paid to more terrestrial stars in this neighborhood.The interior of the spiral is designed with aqua and black dashes. The dashed interior creates optical effects with the eyes and at certain times of the day shifts your perception of the sky’s color.This project utilizes extremely “green” electroluminescent lighting. The entire sculpture consumes less electricity than a household nightlight and operates on a photo cell. Special thanks to the City of West Hollywood, Andrew Campbell, Maria Lusia de Herrera, Greg Coons, Glen Bundrick / Luminous Film.

Bill Domonkos

Black Hole
gif

Bill Domonkos is a filmmaker, GIF maker and stereoscopist. His work combines 2D and 3D computer animation, special effects, photography, video and manipulated archive film footage. His work has been shown internationally in cinemas, film festivals, galleries and museums.

teamlab

チムラボ
soft black hole

人が触れることができるところのすべてが、沈み込むほど、やわらかい空間。空間は真暗で、床と壁の境目はない。人々が作品空間に入ると、空間自体が、人々の身体の重さに影響を受け変化する。そして、人々の身体は、変化する空間に影響を受ける。人々は、互いに作品空間を通して、それぞれの影響を受け合う。
あなたの身体は空間を変化させ、そして、その空間は他者の身体を変化させる。

JOHANNES VOGL

ЙОХАННЕС ФОГЛ
Black Hole

RACHEL DE JOODE

a peanut, half a horse, a chicken foot, a burning cigarette and a black hole

FABIAN OEFNER

ФАБИАН ОЕФНЕР
black hole

David Rabinowitch

“6 Sided Plane in 5 Masses and 3 Scales with 2 Free Regions
The drawings also clarify the schema underlying the locations of the bored holes in the sculptures. Situated along lines linking vertices at the perimeter of the forms, they recall constellation maps or, as with 8 Sided Plane in 7 Masses and 2 Scales with Free Region (1975/2018), the plans of Romanesque cathedrals. Here, again, the relationship is inverted. The black shapes representing the solid stone columns in the plans echo the shafts of air bored through the steel. The term “Romanesque” appears frequently in Rabinowitch’s titles. Though absent here, the conglomeration of shapes visible in Romanesque church plans, like those of Cluny in France, bear an affinity with the additive sensibility evident in Rabinowitch’s structures. Donald Kuspit has focused attention on the artist’s interest in Northwest Coast traditions, especially the totem pole. Like the totem pole, Rabinowitch’s works manifest a “disrupted continuum,” a whole built out of distinct parts. For me, the presence of the drawings in this exhibition subtly undermined that assertion. The lines along which the bored holes are situated form a network that passes over all (or at least most) of the components in each work, in effect linking them. Though no longer visible in the steel versions, the connective links act as a reminder of this second related principle of organization. Some may see it as a complication, a discrepancy, or be disappointed by the realization, but I think it helps demystify these “new” early sculptures. At the same time, the proximity of the studies by no means diminished the deep-rooted and intriguing complexity of Rabinowitch’s sculptural work.”John Gayer

Lin Hwai-min

Formosa
“Formosa relies heavily on words and poetry for its inspiration and imagery. It traces Taiwan’s history from the 16th century, when Portuguese sailors upon seeing the island exclaimed, “Formosa!” meaning “Beautiful!” Poems appear on a white scrim above a white floor. In the beginning, the poems are whole. The black Chinese characters are neatly aligned. Gradually, however, the poems slide away and the characters enlarge, slowly disappear, become abstract, pour like a stream, peel away, and break apart. A chaotic jumble appears. To some extent, the writing dances.” Carmel Morgan

DOUG AITKEN

ダグエイケン
道格·艾特肯
sonic fountain

A large round hole—if it were a hot tub, it would be comfortably orgy-sized—has been gouged roughly out of the slick concrete floor of 303 Gallery and filled with milky gray water. Attached to the black duct-work and girders of the ceiling directly above it is a square of pipe surrounded by a speaker array. In the center of the square and at each of its corners is a computer-controlled spigot, dripping, spitting or jetting out, in a rhythmically complex 15-minute cycle, milky water pumped up from the pit in a closed circuit. This is Doug Aitken’s Sonic Fountain.

ROBERT WILSON, WILLIAM BURROUGHS AND TOM WAITS

The Black Rider
The Black Rider is in twelve parts and a prologue. I had the idea that there would be indoor and outdoor scenes, man-made and natural environments, and that the scenes would alternate. I made a prologue to introduce the company. It begins with a black box standing up. The devil and the entire company come out of the box until they all stand in a line in front of the stage, as in a circus where all artists are introduced at the beginning. Then the devil sings a song: “Come on along with the Black Rider, we’ll have a gay old time. Take off your skin and dance around in your bones. I’ll drink your blood like wine. Come on along with the Black Rider, we’ll have a gay old time…” Anyways, the audience gets a certain idea what the piece is going to be like. Then the characters disappear and the black box gets bigger and bigger, until the whole stage is engulfed in this black spot. The first scene takes place in the interior of a room, with an old family portrait on the back wall – played by an actor.

TACITA DEAN

Turbine Hall

The Turbine Hall of Tate Modern is plunged into deep black gloom. At its east end, like the stained glass window of a cathedral, is a giant vertical screen. It is framed at the edges with sprocket holes, so we feel we are looking at a vast reel of film. In the centre, an ever-changing series of images: a snail on a wind-wobbled leaf, the powerful spume of a fountain, a chimney loosing trails of vapour. Sometimes the image is of the back wall of the Turbine Hall itself, but with its gridded form coloured in red, yellow and blue so it resembles a Mondrian. Or with a giant egg apparently floating from ceiling to floor.

PETER DE CUPERE

Tree Virus
“Tree Virus” sculpture wasn’t much to look at: a dead, black tree rooted in a craggy white ball suspended over a dirt pit, all of it covered by a plastic igloo. Built on a college campus in the Netherlands in 2008, the whole thing might have been leftover scenery from a Tim Burton film if it weren’t for the outrageous smell.
Inside the igloo, a heady mix of peppermint and black pepper saturated the air. It flooded the nose and stung the eyes. Most visitors cried; many ran away. Others seemed to enjoy it, laughing through the tears.

JIRI KYLIAN – STEVE REICH

イリ·キリアン – スティーヴ·ライヒ
יירי קיליאן – סטיב רייך
Иржи Килиана – Стив Райх
Falling Angels
Falling Angels was created in 1989 as one Kylián’s Black and White Ballets. The Black and White ballets consisted of six pieces, with Falling Angel being dance 6. It is choreographed to Steve Reich’s Drumming (Part One) created in 1971, which was based on ceremonial ritual music from Ghana (West Africa). Throughout Fallen Angels there is the use of mesmeric choral movement and repeated phrases. Falling Angels is for 8 women and depicts female dancers in their aim to achieve perfection but succumb in various stages to the human female psyche and female events such as ambition, seduction, pregnancy, birth, death, motherhood and self-awareness. Kylián was influenced by surrealism and minimalism during the creation of this work and the ‘black and white ballets’. In this ballet we see the combination of classical lines and sharp percussive movements that give unpredictability to the piece as a whole