Ronald van der Meijs

Odoshi Cloud Sequence
A symbiosis between nature and culture is created against the backdrop of the Japanese garden in the pond of the Amstelpark. This artwork explores new possibilities to generate sound and composition that are controlled by slow, unpredictable and unexpected elements of nature which are highly respected in Japanese culture. The diversity of natural sounds gives the work an almost meditative character, while the dependance on natural factors evoke a tension between longing and acceptance. This sound installation engages, as a natural sequencer, in a dialogue with the water, sun wind and clouds. It refers to Japanese garden culture by using the principle of the Japanese bamboo water tumbler.

Ken Russell

Кен Рассел
كين راسيل
肯·罗素
켄 러셀
ケン·ラッセル
קן ראסל
Altered States

The character of Dr. Jessup was based on the real life Dr. John Lilly, who invented the isolation tank and experimented with using hallucinogens in combination with it before moving on to research on communicating with dolphins.
Lilly tells the tale of a fellow researcher who took the drug ketamine and believed that he had turned into a “pre-hominid” and was being stalked by a leopard, which was presumably the kernel for the the idea of genetic regression.

cinema full

NILS VÖLKER

Two Hundred and Seventy
Through the combination of an everyday material with precise technology the mixed media installation fills the whole columned hall from the 19th century with its fluid movement and peculiar sound. Concavely arranged and floating above the spectators heads the form of the artwork seems to pass the skylight like the sun’s rays. Subdivided into nine columns, the nearly 70 square metres large piece of art follows a site-specific choreography determined by a program. Its moving surface is made from 270 white garbage bags, being inflated and deflated. In this way shapes and the boundaries of the installation itself start to dissolve. “Two Hundred and Seventy“ is the first installation with an undisguised view behind the scenes and onto the origin of the wavelike and organic movement: 1080 fans, lots of cables and 45 circuit boards

Andrea Ling

the girl in the wood frock
This project is based on a fairy tale in which a girl’s life is changed by what she wears. It is through clothing that the heroine experiences the outside world and the wood dress is both armor and prison for the girl, allowing her to escape the threat of incest while also disguising her true self from the prince.
Each dress in the series is an exercise in controlling one’s most immediate environment and how one navigates such an intimate spatial situation, using covers to filter what we feel by either exaggerating or muting sensation. They are also explorations of material technique and are made using a combination of high and low-tech methods and industrial materials such as printing press felt, rubber, and copper cable. The dresses are built rather than sewn and architectural construction informs their detailing.

CORNELIA PARKER

كورنيليا باركر
科妮莉亚·帕克
קורנליה פרקר
コーネリア·パーカー
코넬리아 파커
Корнелии Паркер
two rooms

For some years Cornelia Parker’s work has been concerned with formalising things beyond our control, containing the volatile and making it into something that is quiet and contemplative like the ‘eye of the storm’. She is fascinated with processes in the world that mimic cartoon ‘deaths’ – steamrollering, shooting full of holes, falling from cliffs and explosions. Through a combination of visual and verbal allusions her work triggers cultural metaphors and personal associations, which allow the viewer to witness the transformation of the most ordinary objects into something compelling and extraordinary.

Neri Oxman

Neri Oxman: Material Ecology

Vespers

“Vespers is a collection of 15 3-D-printed masks that explore the idea of designing with live biological materials. The collection consists of three distinct series, each reinterpreting the concept of the death mask—traditionally a wax or plaster impression of a corpse’s face. Taken as a whole, the three series form a narrative arc from death to rebirth. In the first series, Oxman and The Mediated Matter Group looked at the death mask as a cultural artifact. Fabricated using an algorithm that deconstructed polyhedral meshes into subdivided surfaces, the masks were 3-D printed with photopolymers, as well as with bismuth, silver, and gold, and rendered in color combinations that recur in religious practices around the world.” Rachel Morón

Nicholas Stedman

After Deep Blue

ADB is a modular robot designed for tactile interactions with people. It is composed of a chain of prism-shaped robotic modules. Through the modules’ coordinated behavior, the robot writhes, wriggles and twists in response to the presence of skin and force. The robot is animated only when actively engaged by a person, otherwise it is at rest. Stroking, rubbing or grasping ADB results in it pushing back, retreating or occasionally grasping onto a body part, depending on the combination of stimulus. Participants may experience the object at their leisure. They can play with the device, exploring how it feels, and how it responds to their touch.

Diana Thater

“Science,Fiction”

Through a combination of the temporal qualities of video and the architectural dimension of its physical installation, Thater’s work explores the artifice of its own production and its capacity to construct perception and shape the way we think about the world through its image. Natural diversity, wildlife, and conservation have been persistent themes in the artist’s work, and she has dedicated herself to an examination of the varied kinds of relationships humans have constructed with animals. While her in-depth studies of ecosystems and animal behavior propose observation as a kind of understanding in itself, her ethical position is implicit in the work, which, while subtly political, provides views of the sublime in all its incarnations—stunning, beautiful, and simultaneously terrifying.

Agnes Meyer-Brandis

Cloud Core Scanner

Her current installation IN THE TROPOSPHERE LAB provides insights into the material produced under conditions distant from earth. The exhibition tells of the formation of clouds and shows conditions and combinations of art and science during zero gravity. With the exhibition by Agnes Meyer-Brandis, the project space of the Ernst Schering Foundation once again presents a contemporary art project that stimulates interdisciplinary debate and builds bridges to scientific research. The lab as a gravimetric document of the “Cloud Core Scanner” experiment shows a world alternating between controlled and bound-less states – artistic research in search of the reality level of constructions of the matter that surrounds us.

MARK HANSEN & BEN RUBIN

“Moveable Type”

In the entrance hall of the New York Times Building there is an installation made by Mark Hansen and Ben Rubin “Moveable Type” with hundreds of small monitors where fragments of the newspaper’s electronic files, words, phrases, quotations, places, crosswords, etc… permanently appear in an endless series of combinations.
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WORAPONG MANUPIPATPONG

SPACE INBETWEEN
The series of spatial structures are a combination and overlapping of basic architectural-elements (roof, floor, wall, window, and ladder) and furniture feature (platform with different level for seating, laying, leaning). The shape and form represent contemporary architecture with simplicity of form but complex spaces. These structures can be seen as a transition between inside and outside. It provides variety of posture and different level with intimate space.

ANDREW HIERONYMI

move
File Festival
MOVE is an interactive installation divided into six distinct modules, JUMP, AVOID, CHASE, THROW, HIDE and COLLECT. Each module offers a single-user interaction, based on a verb corresponding to the action the participant is invited to perform. Each verb corresponds to a common procedure acted out by avatars during videogame play. Each module offers an interaction with abstracted shapes (circles, rectangles) behaving according to simplified rules of physics (collision, friction). Each module is color-coded with consistency, where the color red is used for the graphical element that poses the core challenge. Each module increases difficulty in a similar linear manner.What makes MOVE unusual is that unlike most computer vision or sensor based games like Eye-toy or Dance Dance Revolution, the participant IS the avatar, he is not seeing a representation of herself or an indirect result of her actions on a separate screen but instead interacts directly with the projected graphical constituents of the game. Because those graphical elements are non-representational they do not allow for a projection in a fictional space. The combination of abstracted shapes and direct interaction reinforces in the player the focus on the action itself (JUMP, AVOID, CHASE, THROW, HIDE or COLLECT) instead of an ulterior goal.

Juliana Mori & Matteo Sisti Sette

timeLandscape woolrhythms

“timeLandscape – wool rhythms” 2010. Part of timeLandscape series, 2009 – 2010. Video, audio, projector, speakers, custom patch (PD-Gem), sensor, wool engine. Variable dimensions and duration, loop. “timeLandscape – woolrhythms” is an interactive audiovisual installation in which a landscape is depicted from its multiple time possibilities and [re]composed through users’ real time interaction. The installation was developed in Biella, Italy, an area economically attached to textile industry, and deals with the cyclical perception of time and human, linear, interference on it. It gathers nature and artefact, by connecting a physical wool engine to digital imagery of daily cycles. By turning the wheel crank, users generate movement starting the engine. Through a sensor attached to the machine, software calculates the rotation speed, altering parameters for mixing audio and video fragments in real time. Every turn of the machine leads to different time thread combinations in response to the rhythm and speed of each interactor.

FILE FESTIVAL

Jonathan Monk

All The Possible Combinations Of Eight Legs Kicking
Intégrant mouvement, performance et imagerie, l’exposition explore les idées derrière le temps et la séquence, tandis que Monk interroge subtilement la compréhension du spectateur du passage du temps. Avec “Toutes les combinaisons possibles de coups de pied de huit jambes (une à la fois)” (2012-2013), Monk démontre la contrast entre la réalité clinique du temps et notre réaction spontanée. L’œuvre est une représentation littérale de son titre – car les jambes ont été programmées pour donner un coup de pied dans toutes les séquences possibles, soit un total de 40320 séquences différentes qui prennent plus de 177 heures à terminer. Contrairement à cette démonstration objective, le geste de donner des coups de pied est assez explosif, imitant les mouvements d’un danseur de cancan, et c’est cette explosion d’émotion qui met en évidence le suspense qui existe tout au long de l’œuvre. Alors que le spectateur est conscient que les jambes sont spécifiquement programmées pour donner un coup de pied à un moment précis, l’heure précise à laquelle cet événement se produit n’est pas donnée, créant une sorte de jeu de devinettes où le spectateur tente de prédire quand chaque coup de pied se produira, à chaque fois. individu ayant sa propre idée du moment où cela se produira.