BREAKFAST

Empire State
Empire State is a kinetic A.I. artwork visualizing the current time-of-day and weather at the Empire State Building in New York. The imagery was created from running a sketch through an Artificial Intelligence model to generate two variations on the image, each printed on each side of the discs. The piece visualizes the current time-of-day and weather by animating clouds, rain, light/shadow, by rotating sections of discs to the reverse side. When one walks up to the piece, they will see their image reflected back at them, further embedding them to the connection between where they are and the current state in NYC.

Ouchhh

Poetic AI
Ouchhh created an Artificial Intelligence and the t-SNE visualization of the hundreds of books and articles [approx. 20 million lines of text] written by scientists who changed the destiny of the world -and wrote history- were fed to the Recurrent Neural Network during the training. This, later on, was used to generate novel text in the exhibition. 136 projectors shining to be a veritable oneiric experience, the ‘POETIC – AI’ digital installation uses Artificial Intelligence in the visual creation process: the forms, light, and movement are generated by an algorithm that creates a unique and contemplative digital work, an AI dancing in the dark, trying to show us connections we could never see otherwise.

Jennifer Steinkamp

From, the Future
The art is about waiting, something the entire world population knows since the onslaught of Covid-19. The title was also inspired by a dream where I told a scientist I was from the future and he believed me. My interpretation of the dream relates to my interest in the luminous thoughts of the 13th-century Persian poet Rumi, he clearly describes what our souls really are, beautiful, sacred, beyond time. I am fascinated by the existential impermanence of beauty. Beauty offers us a deep connection to the experience of life. The animation consists of cut flowers continuously falling from the sky, it can be seen by looking up to the ceiling. The title infers the signature on the note of a gift.

Marshmallow Laser Feast

Distortions in Spacetime
In a giant star’s final moments, atoms compress to a point where density becomes infinite, time stretches to a stop and the gravitational field is so strong that not even light can escape: a black hole. But the force that creates this dark shadow also spews out a supernova explosion of matter that can eventually coalesce to form planets, plants and people. In Distortions in Spacetime, visitors will see themselves reflected in this matter and will begin to understand the cosmic connection between black holes, dying stars and our very existence.

 

Jonathan Monaghan

Den of Wolves
Den of Wolves is a video installation drawing on a range of references to weave a new multi-layered mythology. The work follows three bizarre wolves through a series of increasingly surreal retail stores as they search for the regalia of a monarch. Composed of one continuous camera shot, the work is an immersive, dreamlike journey drawing connections between popular culture, institutional authority and technological over-dependence.

Fuse

Ljós
Ljós (Icelandic for ‘light’) has been conceived in continuity with the research carried out by fuse* in the field of digital and performative arts, which explores the deep connection between light, space, sound and movement. In Ljós, the performer is the means that allows the viewer to access a surreal and dreamlike space, a dimension with no gravity nor time, made by sounds and images reacting and interacting in real time. A shape-changing universe, which evolves from amniotic fluid in the beginning – protecting and supporting the performer – to the setting for violent explosions and transformations later – leading her to a direct contact with ground and Earth.

Moment Factory

Animistic Imagery
The exhibit introduces visitors to Duffy, the AI Artist, with an invitation to collaborate inside her Symbiotic Studio. This immersive space, made possible through projection mapping and interactive technology, invites guests to become the AI’s muse. As Duffy captures movements generated by visitors through real-time tracking, she draws links and connections, consulting a vast collection of colors and archetypal images of life on Earth. The result is an infinite series of surprising works of art—an artificial interpretation of humanity and the natural world.

Wayne Mcgregor

Torus
Directed by British fashion photographer Nick Knight of SHOWStudio, Torus is a film on human connection and loneliness featuring choreography by Wayne McGregor and styling by Norwegian designer Fredik Tjærandsen. Performed by Company Wayne McGregor, Torus shows dancers wearing inflatable balloons designed by Tjærandsen, orbiting in darkness as isolated entities, occasionally lit as they transition through a temporal universe, a mirror to the life that many are only passing through, barely connecting.

SAŠA SPAČAL MIRJAN ŠVAGELJ ANIL PODGORNIK

Myconnect

Myconnect “offers the experience of a symbiosis of connection between humans, nature and technology. The spectator becomes an actor by lying in a capsule, equipped with a helmet and body sensors measuring the variations in his rhythm This data is modulated and transmitted to a closed universe of mycelium culture (white mushroom) to produce alterations using electrical resistance. These variations in turn generate signals, sent back to the person in the form of vibration, sound and light. Each cycle can be different depending on whether the experience is stimulating or calming. This type of perceptual exchange enabled by technology reveals how much the human being is an integral part of the complex network that links him to his environment.

Índice

Jonattas Poltronieri, Luis Mello, Pedro Venetucci & Rofli Sanches
Phantom Limb

Just like the original box, the installation is a rectangular unit where the user inserts his arm and is urged to move it in different ways. The similarity with the original object disappears as, instead of having a mirror to provide the image that motivates the interaction, there is a screen that mediates the user’s view and the place where his arm actually is. The displayed image of the user’s arm can be reversed, distorted and coloured, among several modifications to simulate in a rich way the strangeness of not having control over a member, and to question whether what is seen is an accurate portrayal of the real body. Although deep and subjective, the topic addressed in this experience is easy and accessible in its interaction, offering various sensory feedbacks to the user. Through it, it is proposed that we experience and reflect upon the disconnection between thought and body, intention and action, sensation and reality.

 

FILE SAO PAULO 2015

Nicole Clouston

Mud
Nicole Clouston is a practice-based researcher currently completing her PhD in Visual Art at York University. In her practice she asks: What happens when we acknowledge, through an embodied experience, our connection to a world teeming with life both around and inside us? Nicole has exhibited across Canada in Montreal, Victoria, Edmonton, and Toronto. She is currently the artist in residence at the Coalesce Bio Art Lab at the University at Buffalo.

Max Cooper

Morphosis
Morphosis uses artificial neural networks to create morphing images of scale. The system explores how natural structures from the most tiny to the most huge, share aesthetic properties, as recognized by the trained network, and recreated in continuous flowing sequence via these connections. It’s a study of the seemingly infinite nature of space and natural physical structure, which can loop back on itself to give endless visual exploration and variation.

Maki Namekawa

Pianographique
Pianographique is a series of collaborations of real time visual artist Cori O’Lan and Maki Namekawa. The visualisations are not videos that are more or less synchronous to the music and it is also not the musician’s playing to prefabricated material, they are jointly created together in the moment of the performance. As with most of Cori O’Lan’s visualizations, all graphic elements are derived directly from the acoustic material, i.e. the sound of the music. For this purpose, the piano is picked up with microphones and these signals are then transformed by the computer into a multitude of information about frequency, pitch, volume, dynamics, etc… This information, in turn, is used to control the graphics computer, create graphical elements or modify them in many ways. Since these processes take place in real time, there is a direct and expressive connection between the music and visual interpretation. The visualization is actually not “created” by the computer but much more by the music itself – the computer is rather the instrument, the brush operated, played by the music.

Nao Tamura

Lexus Interconnection
There are forces in nature that are beyond the control of mankind. We have learned how fragile we are in the face of such forces. However, we have also learned the importance of accepting nature and learning to live in harmony with it. Interconnected and interdependent, there is a constant give-and-take in nature. Life does not rest. Our collective motion, nature’s response to our movements is essential to our planet’s delicate balance. When we are one with nature, we are at our most powerful. Our movement together gives us life. Our movement forward creates the next generation of ideas. Life is always more amazing in motion.

Lisa Park

Blooming
“Blooming” is an interactive audiovisual installation that highlights the importance of human connection. It takes the form of a life-size 3D Cherry blossom tree, which is a common symbol of social ties and transience of life in East Asian culture. As a response to participants’ skin-to-skin contacts, heart rate, and gestures, “Blooming” blossoms according to their intimacy. As audience members hold hands or embrace, the digital Cherry tree flowers bloom and scatter. When they let go off their physical contacts, the flower return to its pre-bloom state. The color of the flowers turns white or red based on participants’ heart rate as they interact with each other. (the faster the heart rate, the redder the tonality; the slower the heart rate, the whiter the tonality). In addition to the visual responses, sounds are also modulated according to the tree’s different stages: pre-bloom, blooming, petals falling.

Ief Spincemaille

Kiss Me

You hold a small mirror to your nose, like a pair of glasses, while kissing someone. You look into your own eyes, but kiss someone else’s lips.
Despite the world being connected through an intricate network of fiberglass, more than ever we seem to be alone together. ‘Kiss Me’ brings these two opposing forces – unbridled narcissim on the one hand and a deep longing for connection on the other -together in one object through reinvention of an age-old instrument: the mirror.

BarabásiLab

Hidden Patterns
The co-citation network for Nature: more than 88,000 papers published by the journal since 1900 are each represented by a dot, coloured by discipline. Papers are linked if another scientific paper (of those indexed in the Web of Science) cites both; the dot size reflects the number of these co-citation links.
Invisible, hidden connections and constantly repeating patterns within nature, society, language, and culture can not only be explored but also made visible. Barabási’s network approach promises to deliver a comprehensive, universal method that will illuminate many phenomena with scientific precision.

ROCIO VON JUNGENFELD

zones of flow (ii)
“zones of flow” is a work-in-progress project which investigates the fluid connections between people, sea and land. The piece zones of flow (ii) is an audiovisual artwork created to for the MAN display, which is located in a public area in NTU-Singapore; an open corridor where there is a regular flow of people moving across the space. The piece has come out of a sailing experience across the Atlantic in a 15m sailing boat. The ongoing project explores the instantaneous but sometimes asynchronous connectivity between things and people as they move in and across digito-tangible environments.

Rasa Smite & Raitis Smits

Swamp Radio
Swamp Radio gets beyond our anthropocenic reality, and maintains connections between the humans and other species. By artistic interventions and transmitting interfaces, the Swamp Radio is turned into a social media megaphone for invisible and inaudible actors of nature. The artists are installing microbial fuel cells, environmental monitoring sensors and transmitting devices to transform the swamps into dynamic power plants and the 21st century multi-voiced broadcast media.

Andrew Schneider

YOUARENOWHERE
Conjuring a futuristic sort of shamanism, Andrew Schneider’s YOUARENOWHERE experiments with the virtues of sensory overload via quantum mechanics, parallel universes, and the “Missed Connections” board on Craigslist. Battling glitchy transmissions, crackling microphones, and lighting instruments falling from the sky, one guy on a mission and a tricked-out interactive new-media landscape merge to transform physical space, warp linear time, and short-circuit preconceived notions of what it means to be here now.

Shaun Hu

Internet of Everything: All Connections
‘Internet of Everything: All Connections’ is a piece of work that connects human, animals, plants, bacteria, environment, compound and equipment using the Internet. It consists of seven parts. One part affects the other by sequence. It doesn’t have a starting point or an ending point in this connection – because they are an interlocking loop structure. The weak bio-electricity of the human body is passed to the bacteria, Proteus. The bacteria starts to vibrate due to the electrical stimulation. Its motion is captured by the microscope and input to Max in real time. Data arising from the change in value in the bacteria movement controls the next part.

Wang & Söderström

Growth
Wang & Söderström is a Copenhagen based transdisciplinary duo composed of Swedish designer Anny Wang and architect Tim Söderström. The bridging of the physical and digital realms is a major theme in their practice and they are constantly trying to challenge the boundaries between them. Fluctuating between art and design, Wang & Söderström wants to throw out pre-existing conventions regarding the digital and put emphasis on the emotional and tactile side of materials, objects and textures to give the digital a more human-relatable quality and create more meaningful connections. “By 3D scanning elements from nature, like tree trunks, leaves and plants and mixing it with surrealistic materials and behaviors, we wanted to let them continue to grow in a digital environment.”

Signe Lidén and Espen Sommer Eide

Vertical Studies
Vertical Studies: Acoustic Shadows and Boundary Reflections; Water Tower Sint Jansklooster In their new collaborative work, Vertical Studies: Acoustic Shadows and Boundary Reflections, Signe Lidén and Espen Sommer invite participants on a journey to a 46-metre-high abandoned water tower in Sint Jansklooster. The tower has been re-imagined as a vertical field-lab where Lidén and Sommer discuss their ongoing research into connections between sound, history, wind and weather. To this end they have constructed a range of special instruments to record and playback sounds in the vertical dimension. The participants on this journey will experience live outdoor vertical studies and a vertical soundscape shaped by Eide and Lidén that ascends the tower’s spiral staircase.

Refik Anadol

Machine Hallucination
Refik Anadol’s most recent synesthetic reality experiments deeply engage with these centuries-old questions and attempt at revealing new connections between visual narrative, archival instinct and collective consciousness. The project focuses on latent cinematic experiences derived from representations of urban memories as they are re-imagined by machine intelligence. For Artechouse’s New York location, Anadol presents a data universe of New York City in 1025 latent dimensions that he creates by deploying machine learning algorithms on over 100 million photographic memories of New York City found publicly in social networks. Machine Hallucination thus generates a novel form of synesthetic storytelling through its multilayered manipulation of a vast visual archive beyond the conventional limits of the camera and the existing cinematographic techniques. The resulting artwork is a 30-minute experimental cinema, presented in 16K resolution, that visualizes the story of New York through the city’s collective memories that constitute its deeply-hidden consciousness.

Jeppe Hein

杰普·海因
ЙЕППЕ ХАЙН
ЈЕПЕ ХЕИН
Distance

An immense circuit, conceived as a graphic composition, is extended across a forest of fine metal pillars. Arabesques, spirals and nodal interconnections support a track for a hundred or so white balls, razing the ground or very high up in the air. An infrared sensor detecting the arrival of each visitor triggers the propulsion of a ball, which then journeys through the vast visual and sonic landscape. The installation draws on different sources evoking a primitive industrial imaginary, such as the machines of Fritz Lang’s Metropolis and Tinguely’s assemblages, and the fairground universe of roller coasters and pinballs.

James Whitaker

Joshua Tree Residence

Whitaker has envisioned an “exoskeleton” made of shipping containers painted bright white. The containers appear like a starburst, with cuboid forms pushing out in all directions.The home is intended to offer a connection to the sun-baked landscape, while concurrently providing a sense of protection and privacy. Square windows frame views of the blue sky and rugged terrain. In some areas, faceted ceilings give the effect of being inside a crystalline form.

Woo Jung Chun

Library
The library is a potent metaphor for knowledge that evokes images of organization, study, research and discovery. Libraries build relationships and connections and act as catalysts or laboratories for creative thoughts. Chun’s project is inspired in part by Jorge Luis Borges’ celebrated text, ‘The Library of Babel’ that compares the library to the universe with the grand idea that it is a repository for all knowledge and every individual truth. The universe is governed by an order that we can perceive only partially yet it evokes ideas of the infinite and the eternal – like matter it is neither created nor destroyed – it just is.

JIM CAMPBELL

led-explosion

“Jim Campbell (b1956) is a San Francisco-based artist who has embraced the connections of light, space and time, as few others have. He uses LED technology and his skills in electrical engineering to masterfully achieve what Andrei Tarkovsky called “sculpting in time”. He introduces the illusions and our minds complete them.” DARRAN ANDERSON

Greg Dunn and Brian Edward

Self-Reflected

Dr. Greg Dunn (artist and neuroscientist) and Dr. Brian Edwards (artist and applied physicist) created Self Reflected to elucidate the nature of human consciousness, bridging the connection between the mysterious three pound macroscopic brain and the microscopic behavior of neurons. Self Reflected offers an unprecedented insight of the brain into itself, revealing through a technique called reflective microetching the enormous scope of beautiful and delicately balanced neural choreographies designed to reflect what is occurring in our own minds as we observe this work of art. Self Reflected was created to remind us that the most marvelous machine in the known universe is at the core of our being and is the root of our shared humanity.

lucy mcrae

compression cradle
Lucy McRae is a visionary artist from Australia that has periodically had films in ASVOFF. Compression Cradle is a futuristic approach to preparing the self for a future that assumes a lack of human touch and the machine affectionately squeezes the body with a sequence of aerated volumes that hold you tight. As McRae envisions it the mechanical touch may be an antidote for today’s ‘forever connectedness’, a behaviour that’s triggered a lonely disconnection with ourselves.

nieto sobejano

The Contemporary Art Center in Córdoba is not a centralized building: the center moves from one space to another, it is everywhere. It is configured as a sequence of precincts linked to a public space, onto which all the different functions of the building flow. Conceived as a place for interaction, it is a common space in which one can express and exchange ideas, see an installation, access exhibitions, visit the cafeteria, spend time in the media library, wait for a performance to begin in the black box, or maybe simply look out onto the Guadalquivir River. The materials help to achieve the art factory character pervading the entire project. In the interior, bare walls, slabs of concrete, and continuous paved flooring establish a spatial structure susceptible to being transformed individually through different interventions. A network of electric, digital, audiovisual, and lighting infrastructures ease access to sockets and connections throughout the building. On the exterior, the building asserts its presence by means of a single material: prefabricated concrete fiberglass panels, or GRC.

Asao Tokolo

ppp-creatures-generator
Asao Tokolo studied at the AA School of Architecture in London following graduation from Tokyo Zokei University in 1992. His decorative patterns based on the concept of ‘connection’ stem from September 11, 2001, and he continues to work in fields straddling art, architecture, and design. He designs and creates simple geometric crests and patterns that can be drawn with a ruler and compass, and three dimensional forms using the same principles.

Morphosis Architects

مورفوسيس المعماريين
モーフォシス建築家
모포 건축가
形态结构建筑师
Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics

The Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics at Caltech brings together a dozen different scientific groups into one structure. The Cahill Center designed by Morphosis Architects, Inc. conceptually acts as an astronomical instrument. A vertical volume pierces the building, tilting it open to the skies and resulting in an occupiable telescope. The Center also physically and symbolically connects Caltech’s South Campus with the the original complex of Spanish and Mediterranean buildings that comprise the historic North Campus. A series of interior corridors that run north to south serve as stitches, reinforcing the connection and serving to direct circulation.

PETER KOGLER

彼得·科格勒
Liquid
Peter Kogler`s works belong to the developing “post medial paintings” (Peter Weibl) in the 80`s. Moulded by the new media, these took on the complex form of installations. One of the main questions was the mental relationship between virtual and real space, as well as the perceptive possibilities of connection. The work, which reminds you of chaotic structures and Baroque dimensions, is based on the circularly moment of repetition, that consciously corresponds to the position of kunst Meran (pedestrian zone).

Lauren Gregory

Triptych
FILE ANIMA+GAMES RIO 2015
Lauren Gregory’s work has been described as primal — drawing from the vocabulary of early human cave paintings, she instinctually always paints with her fingers. Working quickly in oils, she records surprisingly precise images of her live portrait subjects, commemorating the tenderness of their brief human connection.

Hella Jongerius

Breathing Colour
“Hella Jongerius’ work puts colour center stage. Never one to folllow commercial trends, she has developed a use of colour that is uniquely her own. Jongerius has been researching colour pigments and the connection between colour, fabric and light for years.

Amy Karle

Internal Collection yellow silk dress based on ligaments
Merging anatomy, fashion, and technology, each piece is created by hand and digital manufacturing technologies. By depicting designs inspired by anatomy, this work communicates that, when we share our likeness and what is going on inside of us, an opportunity is offered for finding beauty within ourselves and connection with others.

Danny Hillis

parallel supercomputer
Connection Machine CM-1(1986) and CM-2 (1987)

The Connection Machine was the first commercial computer designed expressly to work on “artificial intelligence” problems simulating intelligence and life. A massively parallel supercomputer with 65,536 processors, it was the brainchild of Danny Hillis, conceived while he was a doctoral student studying with Marvin Minsky at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Lab. In 1983 Danny founded Thinking Machines Corporation to build the machine, and hired me to lead the packaging design group. Working with industrial design consultants Allen Hawthorne and Gordon Bruce, and mechanical engineer consultant Ted Bilodeau, our goal was to make the machine look like no other machine ever built. I have described that journey in this article, published in 1994 in the DesignIssues journal and republished in 2010 in the book The Designed World.

video

INFINITE

Hibanana Studio
Liu Chang & Miao Jing
FILE LED SHOW
“INFINITE” is an audiovisual installation created by New York-based visual artist duo Liu Chang and Miao Jing, in collaboration with sound artist Gan Jian. “INFINITE” explores the connection between time and space, discusses about spatial gravity and its influence to human’s perception. Sound and visual elements are in completely in sync in order to contribute the immersive experience.

Eric Klarenbeek, Designer of the unusual

Eye Jewellery
Eric Klarenbeek does special projects, or let’s say the unusual, for unusual people, projects or purposes. His studio connects creatives, designers, local crafts and clients by inventing new projects and products and believing our world can be so much better, more beautiful and honest. “My work is characterized by interaction and innovation. My products can be in motion, react on our presence or respond on developments in our society. I search for new meaning and principles in objects, for unexplored connections between materials, production methods, makers and users. Scale and appliance are irrelevant. I’ve designed jewellery, but also developed concepts to connect tourists to local craftsmen”, says Eric.

jkmm architects

Amos Rex
Amos Rex, formerly known as Amos Anderson Art Museum brings contemporary architecture to the modernist Lasipalatsi. The connection between the past and the present creates an interesting starting point
 for the design of the new museum.

DOMINIC WILCOX

دومينيك ويلكوكس
多米尼克·威尔科克斯
דומיניק וילקוקס
ドミニク·ウィルコックス
Доминик Уилкокс
field

This installation by artist and designer Dominic Wilcox aims to breath life into the simple, inanimate shoe, making a connection with nature while referencing the lives of the absent owners. The shoe laces of seven hundred eco-friendly shoes rise up into the air as though growing towards the light creating a field of green on a bed of earth.

SCOTT CARTER

“The connections between humans and the built environment interest me, serving as the primary source material for my work. I formulate calculated assessments of my environment, ultimately manifesting connections between art, architecture, design and environmental systems.”

matthew day jackson

ماثيو اليوم جاكسون
Мэтью Джексон день
axis mundi

Matthew Day Jackson creates all-encompassing works in a wide range of media that make connections between seemingly disparate themes and narratives, from Impressionist painting to the surface of the moon; art history to rap music; nuclear testing to paranormal activity. Jackson’s work also addresses his theory of the “Horriful,” the belief that everything one does has the potential to evoke both beauty and horror at the same time.

Georgina Santiago and Guillermo Mora

ギジェルモ・モラ
VITRINE

VITRINE is a collaboration with artist Guillermo Mora, with who Georgina Santiago has a speciall creative connection. The idea behind it was to merge the two creative worlds in the way that the essence of a gallery is translated to the clothes and sorround them with a sculpure. The boundaries between art and fashion get blurry and the body become a sculpture itself. The surroundings of the body become part of it and all mutate into one. The body became a vitrine were the art is exposed.

Joe Diebes

Oyster
oyster is a new opera (in progress) about a surprising precursor to last.fm and Pandora. In the 1960’s, renowned American folklorist Alan Lomax developed a wildly ambitious system called cantometrics for coding and analyzing folk songs from every corner of the world. The opera is structured as a public lecture of Alan Lomax’s folk song analysis as demonstrated by four singers, who embody the IBM360 mainframe computer used to correlate his vast amounts of data. Working with the BOTCH vocal ensemble, I am reconstructing the folksong styles from regions as disparate as Bali, West Africa, and Central America using only the data from Lomax’s study. Things like melodic complexity, vocal blend, and nasality, are adjusted by the singers as they circumnavigate the globe. This data vocalization is further mediated by the ensemble’s distinctive extended vocal techniques, and is accompanied by a film narrative that unravels connections between cybernetics, surrealism and ethnography. The film also features a wide range of material drawn from the Alan Lomax archive at The Library of Congress.
.
oyster will be performed by BOTCH ensemble: Christina Campanella, Michael Chinworth, John Rose, and Saori Tsukada

JON SHIREMAN

Broken Flower
Liquid Nitrogen

Throughout his career, Shireman has maintained a connection with flowers in decay; in other still lifes, he has cataloged the wilting of tulips and mums. This series, unlike those previous, is brutal and instantaneous. Where his other flowers underwent a slow, gradual death, these broken flowers are quickly frozen and violently ruptured. The process captured here is not a natural one but one that necessitates the use of a manmade element.

SHANNON GOFF

Eggbeater
This Eggbeater by Shannon Goff catches the viewer’s attention by its sheer size. Also, the content of the sculpture, an eggbeater, is striking in such a large display. Few people have ever noticed the intricacies of an eggbeater, except perhaps those who engineer the machine. Thus, seeing such a large rendition gives importance to each wheel, each connection in this mundane contraption.

NINA MARIE BARBUTO

glory holes
Intimate friction show at the mattress factory in pittsburgh ‘glory holes’, an installation by american artist nina marie barbuto, delves into the histories of the spaces around us. the term, similarly used in hetero and homosexual copulation acts, serve as a portal for an anonymous yet intimate connection between the two bodies. as we move through the architectural space, we lose track of the larger figure, bones, and mass that surounds us.

Amy Karle

Internal Collection
FILE SAO PAULO 2017
Internal Collection
Switching up conventions about the body and beauty, the selections from her “Internal Collection” showing at FILE represent internal anatomy in external wearable form. Merging anatomy, fashion, and technology, each piece is created by hand and digital manufacturing technologies. By depicting designs inspired by anatomy, this work communicates that, when we share our likeness and what is going on inside of us, an opportunity is offered for finding beauty within ourselves and connection with others.

Marcos Novak

Turbulent Topologies
This exhibition explores turbulence as both a formal principle and as a condition of the global metropolis. Through a variety of means, both visible and invisible, it examines the turbulent topologies of mixed layers and crossed currents, hidden links and sudden connections, flow networks and perturbed stratifications. Using both high and low technologies, it proposes a continuum between actual, virtual, and transactive space, form, and inhabitation. Drawing upon diverse fields such as particle physics and biology, logic and geology, and lived histories as they are alternately formed by and trapped in the webs of culture, it offers a series of formal propositions in response to the critical acceptance of turbulence as a condition of twenty-first century life.

Dimitris Mairopoulos and Skylar Tibbits

Self-Replicating Spheres

Self-Replicating Spheres explores the processes of growth, encapsulation and division through macro-scale objects on an oscillating table. This project attempts to demonstrate synthetic cellular division and replication through non-biological physical objects, without the use of robotics. The individual spheres were created with a hollow shell and an arrangement of small metal spheres and magnets. This internal structure provides the force of attraction for growing connections, the flexibility and, ultimately, the capability to divide. By adding more spherical units and supplying energy in the form of the oscillating table, the system will continually grow and divide.

Refik Anadol, Kilroy Realty Corporation and SOM Architects

Virtual Depictions
Parametric data sculptures
The main idea of ‘Virtual Depictions:San Francisco’ is to bring 21st century approach to public art to define new poetics of space through media arts and architecture and to create a unique parametric data sculptures that has an intelligence, memory and culture. Through architectural transformations of media wall located in 350 Mission’ lobby, home of Salesforce, main motivation with this seminal media architecture approach is to frame this experience with a meticulously abstract and cinematic site-specific data-driven narration. As a result, this media wall turns into a spectacular public event making direct and phantasmagorical connections to its surroundings through simultaneous juxtapositions. The project also intends to contribute to contemporary discourse of public art by proposing a hybrid blend of media arts and architecture in 21st century.

Szilárd Cseke

Multiple Identities, Sustainable Development
The focus is on multiple identities. There are pale, milky plastic pipes attached to the ceiling of the concrete interior, inside which, moved by fans, roll white balls. One after the other. If the one arrives, a new one is sent to another tube.Such works breathe inner unity. This closeness is sometimes a closeness, if not encryption. Because the language of contemporary installation art is foreign and difficult to read. The viewer’s gaze likes to evaluate subjectively and is always shaped by environmental influences such as culture, trends, styles, beliefs, experiences and politics. This makes the interpretation uncertain, it becomes subjective, often tempting to misconduct. Because anyone who claims that the work of art is created in the eye of the beholder and means that everyone, regardless of where they come from and how educated, can make a valid statement about a work of art is wrong. What Marcel DuChamp meant is that it unfolds in the eye of the beholder. But this development should not mean that simply opening the eyes also brings with it knowledge and insight. These qualities are developed through active participation, through perception. This, in turn, is not only feasible through the visual stimulus in the eye. It is possible, however, if you know who the artist is, what he is doing, what he wishes to express and with which underlying design principles the view is guided in what way to what. Only then does the processing take place, a connection of the causal relationships, which ultimately leads to art in the eye of the beholder. To an inner feeling outside of the spontaneous feelings.

Jeff Carter

Construction N
Often occupying both physical and temporal space, my sculpture has always incorporated both conventional and experimental media, including woodcarving, metalworking, installation, kinetics, microelectronics and video. While it tends to be visually diverse, the friction between object and memory has been at the conceptual core of my sculptural practice since 1994. The images, objects and narratives of a particular place or experience undergo distortions each time they are represented, and it is these forms of abstraction I explore in my sculpture.
Earlier bodies of work have utilized the physical residue of my traveling – the souvenirs, postcards, snapshots and videotapes – as central elements of the sculpture, forcing them to reveal their own inadequacy, disengagement or transformation, to subvert the nostalgic ideal, or to disrupt the usual implications of value and validation in a cultural artifact. In later works I utilize the physicality of scale, motion, and orientation to extend and challenge the conventional representation of landscape. These pieces define specific places as indefinite spatial constructs that complicate the certainty of “being there,” and are part of a larger attempt to relate a fragmented travel narrative through architecture, landscapes and souvenirs.
I have been using IKEA products as raw material for several years, and continue to be interested in extracting conceptual value from it. I am currently exploring the relationship between the Modern avant-garde and contemporary consumer design culture. In my recent work, I attempt to articulate various points of connection and rupture between IKEA and the Bauhaus by constructing scale models of demolished or unrealized buildings by Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius using “hacked” IKEA products such as tables, bookshelves and flooring.

Nao Tamura

Interconnection

CHRIS SAUTER

Known Universe, Constellation: Zubiate/Pell
My principal strategies are, the transformation of common objects into other recognizable objects, extreme scale shifts, and the juxtaposition of disparate materials and images.I have converted items from the home into landscapes or sites of natural and industrial processes to show the interaction of nature, culture, and origins, and constructed models of internal organs from common materials to position these connections within the body.

DOPLUDO COLLECTIVE

Connections With Nature

SHO HASHIMOTO AND TAKASHI MATSUMOTO

pileus: internet umbrella
Pileus is an umbrella connected to the Internet to make walking in rainy days fun. Pileus has a large screen on the top surface, a built-in camera, a motion sensor, GPS, and a digital compass. The current prototype has two main functions: photo-sharing and 3D map navigation.The photo function is connected to a major web service: Flickr API. A user can take photo with a camera on the umbrella, and pictures are uploaded to Flickr in two minutes with context tags via a wireless Internet connection. User can also enjoy theirselves watching photo-streams downloaded from Flickr with simple operation of wrist snapping.

JULIUS VON BISMARCK & BENJAMIN MAUS

perpetual storytelling apparatus
The “Perpetual Storytelling Apparatus” is a drawing machine illustrating a never-ending story by the use of patent drawings.The machine translates words of a text into patent drawings. Seven million patents – linked by over 22 million references – form the vocabulary. By using references to earlier patents, it is possible to find paths between arbitrary patents. They form a kind of subtext.New visual connections and narrative layers emerge through the interweaving of the story with the depiction of technical developments.The “Perpetual Storytelling Apparatus” is a drawing machine illustrating a never-ending story by the use of patent drawings.The machine translates words of a text into patent drawings. Seven million patents – linked by over 22 million references – form the vocabulary. By using references to earlier patents, it is possible to find paths between arbitrary patents. They form a kind of subtext. New visual connections and narrative layers emerge through the interweaving of the story with the depiction of technical developments.