RENE LALOUX

Рене Лалу
gandahar

René Laloux, criou Gandahar, seu último filme de animação. Baseado no romance de Jean-Pierre Andrevon Les Hommes-machines contra Gandahar Esta fascinante animação adulta combina a famosa imaginação de Laloux com a do designer de animação Philippe Caza. “A minha busca começou com um enigma. “Em mil anos, Gandahar foi destruído, e todo o seu povo massacrado. Há mil anos, Gandahar será salvo, e o que não pode ser evitado será.” -Sylvain. Este filme está no planeta Gandahar, onde a paz reina e a pobreza é desconhecida. O estilo de vida utópico é perturbado por relatos de pessoas nas fronteiras periféricas sendo transformadas em pedra. Enviado para investigar, o Príncipe Sylvain (João Shea) cai e é resgatado pelas experiências genéticas deformadas e horrendas que correram mal e deixado para defender-se por si mesmos. Com sua ajuda, Sylvain descobre que a Metamorfose, um cérebro gigante também criado em uma experiência, está tentando destruir Gandahar.
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René Laloux created Gandahar, his last animated film. Based on Jean-Pierre Andrevon’s novel Les Hommes-machines against Gandahar This fascinating adult animation combines Laloux’s famous imagination with that of animation designer Philippe Caza. “My quest began with a riddle. “In a thousand years, Gandahar was destroyed, and all his people slaughtered.

Stefan Tiefengraber

your unerasable text
“your unerasable text” is an interactive installation, dealing with the topics of data storage and elimination of data. The installation can be placed in an exhibition, but ideally it’s exhibited in a public space window, where it can be used by people passing by 24h a day. The participant is asked to send a textmessage to the number written on a sign next to the installation. “send your unerasable textmessage to +43 664 1788374”. The receiver mobile transfers it to a computer, which is layouting the message automatically. Then it is printed on to a DIN A6 paper, which is falling directly on to a papershredder. There the message remains readable for a few moments and gets destroyed then. The shredded paper forms a visible heap on the floor, which reminds of a generative graphic.

Clap Studio

Mist Installation
An installation designed by Clap for Minsk, Belarus, that was built by volunteers from the city itself. For the concept of this installation Clap starts from the history of Minsk, a city that during the Second World War was devastated. The bombs destroyed 80% of the buildings and the city was not rebuilt until the 1950s. That is why the population of this city remembers these times as something unpleasant and many of them prefer not to talk about it. The design studio starts from a geometric volume that represents in a conceptual way the volume of a building. They imagine that the bombs fall on him destroying it, generating new openings and brand new volumes. These new openings result ingeniously in an entrance and a viewpoint on the top. The destruction gives way to the function generates grandstands, stairs and seats. From the inside, life makes its way in the form of a tree, exceeding the height of the installation itself.

André Komatsu

O estado das Coisas
Start­ing from demo­li­tions, aban­doned objects, destroyed walls, Komatsu acts on a recon­struc­tion, search­ing for new mod­els of exis­tence and coex­is­tence

Woo Jung Chun

Library
The library is a potent metaphor for knowledge that evokes images of organization, study, research and discovery. Libraries build relationships and connections and act as catalysts or laboratories for creative thoughts. Chun’s project is inspired in part by Jorge Luis Borges’ celebrated text, ‘The Library of Babel’ that compares the library to the universe with the grand idea that it is a repository for all knowledge and every individual truth. The universe is governed by an order that we can perceive only partially yet it evokes ideas of the infinite and the eternal – like matter it is neither created nor destroyed – it just is.

David Spriggs

Regisole
Spriggs’ ‘Regisole’ is inspired by the ancient equestrian statue of the same name originally erected during the 3rd century AD for a Roman Emperor in Ravenna, Italy. ‘Regisole’ means ‘Sun King’. Regis is Latin for king, and Sol means the sun. The original ‘Regisole’ was destroyed after the French Revolution since it was seen as a symbol of monarchy. Spriggs’ positioning of the police officer and horse accurately represent the description of the positioning of the original ‘Regisole’, such as with the outstretched hand of the officer in the ‘adlocutio‘ position (Latin: addressing) exercising power and authority.

Stefan Tiefengraber

User Generated Server Destruction
The visitors of the website www.ugsd.net can trigger six hammers and drop them onto a server that is located in the exhibition. This server hosts exactly the same website www.ugsd.net, which also shows a video stream to follow what’s happening with the piece. The installation ends when the server is destroyed and thus can not host the website any more. It is then presented as an object along with the documentation of the process.

GIUSEPPE LICARI

朱塞佩 利卡里
The sky in a room

“Nature has always been a big passion and the relation of nature and man-made environments is something I often try to confront in my work. The Sky in a Room was first inspired by the forests’ fires that in 2007 destroyed a big part of the south of Europe. They were largely man-made fires, intending to generate new land available for building speculation. A sick tree was cut down by the municipality of Rotterdam, cut in smaller pieces, archived and re-built inside the exhibition space, against the architectural surfaces of the gallery. The trunk of the tree was removed in order to give the public a different physical relation to the tree itself and to the white sterilized space of the gallery. The dead tree presents its branches covered with a layer of moss and molds creating a suspended landscape.”

Leo Selvaggio

URME

My work, www.youareme.net , explores what happens when the methodology of open sourcing is applied to identity. In effect, I have relinquished control over the creation of my persona online, and have provided to the public my identity and image as material to be manipulated, created, and even destroyed. In our highly surveiled and sensitive society, I am interested in what a public might do with open access to my information. I am not only concerned with the dynamics of supposed public and private information, but also with the carefully curated creation of an online identity. How do social technologies like Facebook shape the way we present ourselves, and how do we go about editing the realities of our lives for online consumption? And if we create or recreate ourselves through our technologies, who exactly could I be, if that process is one open to public discourse. Could this expand the possibilities of who I am, or ruin my cyber-social relations and credibility?

JONATHAN SCHIPPER

Slow Motion Car Crash

Jonathan Schipper’s work provides an alternative way of experiencing the world by slowing down physical events to almost imperceptible movement. His slow motion car crash sculptures are actual cars moving at speeds of 7mm per hour into a choreographed collision. The spectacular moment of the car crash is rendered safe and almost static. With a dramatic inevitability that reflects our own mortality, over the course of the Festival month the car is eventually destroyed.

Adam Cvijanovic

Drawing inspiration from Renaissance fresco painting, Adam Cvijanovic’s ‘portable murals’ depict contemporary landscapes with a sense of celestial awe. Spanning 75 feet, Cvijanovic’s Love Poem captures the dreamy and disquieting essence of suburban Americana as a rapturous science fiction tableau. Envisioning sun-bleached L.A. ten minutes after the end of gravity, Cvijanovic’s utopia ascends in a whirlwind of consumerist ecstasy. Emulating movie backdrops as well as the acclivous perspective of cathedral dome tromp l’oiels, Love Poem… combines the sublime horror of disaster films with a majestic religiosity, as bungalows, Broncos, and palm trees are destroyed in the exaltation of their own perfectness. Painted entirely by the artist without assistants, on a plastic used by Fed Ex, Cvijavovic’s work reconstitutes the intimacy of timeless artistry with a modern day immediacy.

THOMAS LANFRANCHI

Structure volante

Thomas Lanfranchi uses lightweight materials to create environmentally responsive sculptures. Many of his projects have been wind blown, taking the form of kites or wind socks. He has installed these pieces at sites across France and on buoys at sea. On a recent visit to Australia he made a journey around the outback, creating and documenting a new airborne sculpture each day to suit the site. Working with a type of plastic commonly used for shopping bags, Lanfranchi is able to make very large structures that are capable of being supported by the lightest breeze. When they are destroyed after the exhibition an object the size of a blue whale collapses into a carrier bag.

YVES MARCHLAND AND ROMAIN MEFFRE

The Ruins of Detroit

“Detroit, industrial capital of the XXth Century, played a fundamental role shaping the modern world. The logic that created the city also destroyed it. Nowadays, unlike anywhere else, the city’s ruins are not isolated details in the urban environment. They have become a natural component of the landscape. Detroit presents all archetypal buildings of an American city in a state of mummification. Its splendid decaying monuments are, no less than the Pyramids of Egypt, the Coliseum of Rome, or the Acropolis in Athens, remnants of the passing of a great Empire.” Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre

POTLATCH

Gretchen at the Potlatch Feast

“Potlatch is a festive event within a regional exchange system among tribes of the North pacific Coast of North America, including the Salish and Kwakiutl of Washington and British Columbia.”
The potlatch takes the form of governance, economy, social status and continuing spiritual practices. A potlatch, usually involving ceremony, includes celebration of births, rites of passages, weddings, funerals, puberty,and honoring of the deceased. Through political, economic and social exchange, it is a vital part of these Indigenous people’s culture. Although protocol differs among the Indigenous nations, the potlatch could involve a feast, with music, dance, theatricality and spiritual ceremonies. The most sacred ceremonies are usually observed in the winter.
Within it, hierarchical relations within and between clans, villages, and nations, are observed and reinforced through the distribution of wealth, dance performances, and other ceremonies. Status of families are raised by those who do not have the most resources, but distribute the resources. The host demonstrates their wealth and prominence through giving away the resources gathered for the event, which in turn prominent participants reciprocate when they hold their own potlatches.
Before the arrival of the Europeans, gifts included storable food (oolichan [candle fish] oil or dried food), canoes, and slaves among the very wealthy, but otherwise not income-generating assets such as resource rights. The influx of manufactured trade goods such as blankets and sheet copper into the Pacific Northwest caused inflation in the potlatch in the late eighteenth and earlier nineteenth centuries. Some groups, such as the Kwakwaka’wakw, used the potlatch as an arena in which highly competitive contests of status took place. In rare cases, goods were actually destroyed after being received. The catastrophic mortalities due to introduced diseases laid many inherited ranks vacant or open to remote or dubious claim—providing they could be validated—with a suitable potlatch.
Sponsors of a potlatch give away many useful items such as food, blankets, worked ornamental mediums of exchange called “coppers”, and many other various items. In return, they earned prestige. To give a potlatch enhanced one’s reputation and validated social rank, the rank and requisite potlatch being proportional, both for the host and for the recipients by the gifts exchanged. Prestige increased with the lavishness of the potlatch, the value of the goods given away in it.