Iwai Toshio and Nishibori Ty

Tenori-On
Media artist Toshio Iwai and and Yu Nishibori of the Music and Human Interface Group, Yamaha Center for Advanced Sound Technology, have collaborated to design a new digital musical instrument for the 21st+century, TENORI-ON. A 16×16 matrix of LED switches allows everyone to play music intuitively, creating a “visible music” interface. It consists of a hand-held screen with a grid of LED switches, any of which can be activated in a number of ways to create an evolving musical soundscape. The LED switches are held within a magnesium frame, which has two built-in speakers located on the top of frame, as well as a dial and buttons that control the type of sound and beats per minute produced.

panGenerator

Apparatum
Created by panGenerator, Apparatum is a custom made apparatus with digital interface that emits purely analogue sound. It is inspired by the heritage of the Polish Radio Experimental Studio – one of the first studios in the world producing electroacoustic music.more

Jeff Shore and Jon Fisher

Cliff Hanger

Jeff Shore and Jon Fisher started their collaborative practice in 2002. Trained as a visual artist, Jeff Shore develops the visible sculptures and mechanisms, while Jon Fisher builds the electronics, writes the software, and creates the original soundtracks; for this he uses both digital and analog audio sources. The result of their collaboration is a series of kinetic devices and installations that generate live animated video and musical compositions. Similar to cinema storytelling, the movement in the pieces relate to the accompanying soundtrack or animation, and similar to a theater of automata, the pieces create precise and captivating sequential events. Bridging high and low-tech devices and instruments, the collaborative team creates mechanically activated moments of wonder, explores the relationship between automatism and chance, and comments on the impact of technology interfaces in our lives.

Tangible Media Group

Transform

A few months ago, an MIT team showed the inForm physical interface, which mimics its movements in real time. This week in Milan, they presented the next iteration of the system, much bigger and even more sophisticated. You need to see the videos. The team is called Tangible Media Group, led by Professor Hiroshi Ishii; they explore how digital interfaces – present in every gadget we use – can be transformed into physical objects.

And we also have this new prototype, called Transform, which comes even closer to that vision. The team describes the table to Co.Design as a piece of furniture transformed into “a dynamic machine driven by the flow of data and energy”, thanks to the three panels on its surface.

Kohei Nawa

Biomatrix
“Biomatrix” is an installation of endles scycles of eruptive cell bubbles emerging on the surface of liquid silicone oil. This circulation of the colored liquid evokes the behaviour of magma or blood, and due to the high viscosity of silicon oil, illustrates the movement of the material at a speed deceptively slower than the viewer’s expectation. The electrically controlled pool becomes an interface that amplifies visual impact, and infinitely produces cell patterns. An orderly grid formation appears as a digital matrix, while closer observation reveals irregularities such as sporadic and simultaneous effervescence and plosive sounds breaking the surface tension.

Marc Lee

10.000 Moving Cities
Visitors can select any city or place, using a digital interface. About the chosen place, the Internet is searched in real time for latest text, image, video and sound informations. Four projectors and eight audio speakers project the results into the space. Visitors are able to walk through the model and experience the information in 3D. Attracted and inspired by images, sound, text and videos, visitors explore the places and perceive fragments of the immense amount of data. Additionally audio and visuals constantly change, they are never the same, always in movement as the place as itself. Just as all cities over the world are different, so different and alive appear the projections and sounds.

The OCR

Specimen Box

The OCR began work on Specimen Box in 2014 at the request of Microsoft’s Digital Crimes Unit. Microsoft’s Cybercrime Center monitors communications coming from hundreds of millions of PCs around the world that have become infected by botnet malware. Employing data sonification together with advanced visualization techniques, Specimen Box provides a configurable multi-sensory presentation of botnet signal activity in real time. It also features a multitouch gesture-based interface for navigating, exploring, selecting, and examining the billions of signals that have previously been collected. Users can access the collected signals based on their activity levels, the geographic locations of their sources, or their daily activity patterns over time, using clustering to group sources with similar behavior.

Dirk Koy & Bild und Bewegung

Luftraum
In 2016, Dirk Koy founded the studio for motion design and experimental film «Dirk Koy Bild und Bewegung». In his work, he uses different technologies (drones / 2D and 3D animation / photogrammetry / AR / VR) to create moving digital images. He investigates the interface between reality and virtuality and is also looking for the painterly component in the digital context. The Experiment plays a central role.

MARTIN KALTENBRUNNER

reactable
file festival

The ReacTable is a collaborative electronic music instrument with a tabletop tangible multi-touch interface. Several simultaneous performers share complete control over the instrument by moving and rotating physical objects on a luminous round table surface. By moving and relating these objects, representing components of a classic modular synthesizer, users can create complex and dynamic sonic topologies, with generators, fi lters and modulators, in a kind of tangible modular synthesizer or graspable fl ow-controlled programming language. The instrument was developed by a team of digital luthiers under the direction of Dr. Sergi Jordà. The “Interactive Sonic Systems” team works in the Music Technology Group within the Audiovisual Institute at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona, Spain. Its main activities concentrate on the design of new musical interfaces, such as tangible musical instruments and musical applications for mobile devices. The reactable intends to be: collaborative: several performers (locally or remotely), intuitive: zero manual, zero instructions, sonically challenging and interesting, earnable and masterable (even for children), suitable for novices (installations) and advanced electronic musicians (concerts). The reactable hardware is based on a translucent, round multi-touch surface. A camera situated beneath the table continuously analyzes the surface, tracking the player’s fi ngertips and the nature, position and orientation of physical objects that are distributed on its surface. These objects represent the components of a classic modular synthesizer. The players interact by moving these objects, changing their distance, orientation and the relation to each other. These actions directly control the topological structure and parameters of the sound synthesizer. A projector, also from underneath the table, draws dynamic animations on its surface, providing a visual feedback of the state, the activity and the main characteristics of the sounds produced by the audio synthesizer.

LUMEN

Homage to B. Franklin
File Festival
Homage to B. Franklin is an interactive sound installation. Like Franklin, we also got inspired by the glass harps, so popular in the eighteenth century and still enjoyed nowadays. With this reference in mind, we aim to realize a dialogue between the past and the approach to explore sonority from elements of everyday life -like simple crystal glasses filled with water- and the present, in which we use electronic synthesizers and tangible digital interfaces to generate music. In both cases, there is something magical about being able to generate music without necessarily being an instrumentalist, without making use of classical or conventional instruments. In both, the resulting sound is different from what these instruments can generate, but still music. Participation from the audience is essential for this work to make sense. This is not an artwork of mere contemplative character. We are interested in motivating the participation and the dialogue work-individual and between individuals, since this is a project in which one can interact in groups.

CHRIS SUGRUE

delicate boundarie

This interactive installation imagines that the worlds inside our digital devices can move into the physical world. Small bugs made of light crawl out of a computer screen onto the human bodies that make contact with them, often surprising their audience as they try to abandon a virtual existence. The magic of the illusion takes shape as the audience lets them explore their bodies, crawling from one person to the next in a strangely intimate way. As digital technologies have become embedded in everyday life, the line between the virtual and real is increasingly blurred. Delicate Boundaries playfully explores our expectations and understanding of interfaces and interactivity.