Aleksandr Sokurov

ألكسندر سوكوروف
亚历山大·索科洛夫
Александр Сокуров
Russian Ark

“Alexander Sokurov’s desire to film The Russian Arch in one continuous take required extraordinary technical solutions. Since it is physically impossible to shoot more than twelve minutes of conventional film, we had to shoot on video. However, it was only the relatively recent arrival of 24p high definition compact cameras that offered the visual quality and the ability to make this film for theaters, including transferring the digital image to a 35mm negative.With the help of German specialists a complex portable platform was designed to meet the demands of the scenario which included precise architectural plans, highlighting the distance of 1300 meters covered by the course of the action. It was decided that the only way to move the camera would be to use a steadycam, although we could not be sure until after the final image that such a long steadycam shot would be possible, given the physical performance. extreme demanded from the German cinematographer, Tilman Büttner. After months of rehearsals, the 867 actors and extras, the three “live” orchestras all had to know their position and precise roles “. It’s just amazing.

cinema full

JON MCCORMACK

flicker

Flicker is an immersive electronic environment of generative image and sound. A collaborative work with Oliver Bown. Based on biological models of firefly behaviour, Flicker generates an ever shifting rhythmic, meditative environment to the viewer. Flicker uses 4 channels of synchronised high definition video and 8 channels of sound to immerse the viewer in a phenomenologically rich environment of artificial life. The work is a large-scale agent-based simulation, with each agent providing a rhythmic pulse at regular intervals. Agents try to synchronise their pulse with other agents in their immediate neighbourhood. The collective pulsations of groups of local agents are spatially sonified with int exhibition space. Over time, large groups synchronise at different rates, leading to complex visual and aural structures, syncopating and constant shifting in to a long term complexity.

Whyixd

Through the Membrane
We define the space around us by observing and perceiving light and shadow. That is to say, our perception shapes our basic understanding of this sensory world, and hence the “reality” we believe in. If our experiential knowledge and awareness of space are challenged, would our definition of a “real phenomenon” also be changed? Through the Membrane utilizes optical polarizers to change how light passes through space. The installation does not rely on any electromechanical devices. Simply with creative use of material and structure, it presents a super-sensory experience in space where reality and illusion are inextricably juxtaposed.

OTA+

Lumifoil
Lumifoil is a temporary roof canopy at the Florida International University Paul L. Cejas School of Architecture. Our goal was to introduce a new “intrusion” at the heart of what FIU Architect Bernard Tschumi coined the “red generator,” thereby heeding his call for provocation in the form of an architectural intervention. This proposal responds to Tschumi’s discourse and the building itself might apply to the parametric digital project. Rather than design a canopy that is entirely emergent – a bottom up strategy in which the whole is the sum of its parts, and be definition, disconnected from its environment – we began with an overall form that is derived via a series of projected geometries generated directly from the cut out’s in the building’s envelope. These invisible forms intersect inside the empty container, providing a framework for generating a new surface.

Kate Cooper

Infection Drivers
Infection Drivers (2019) explores the body under attack. In this work, a CGI figure struggles to move and breathe in a translucent suit, which takes her body through transmutations of stereotypically masculine and feminine physiques as it inflates and deflates. In a time of increased public surveillance through facial-recognition software and biometric data  mining, Cooper’s high-definition world invites us to investigate and perhaps find freedom in the technologies often used to constrain us.

Jordan Wolfson

요르단 울프슨
ジョーダンウォルフソン

Female Figure

The stare of the animatronic sculpture is so intense, it would put anyone uncomfortable. The mask is probably there as a way to avoid creating a human face using animatronics but it also definitely adds to the creepiness of the overall look. The importance of the gaze is found throughout Wolfson’s work but it finds here a very special interpretation. He gives the ability to gaze to two different entities, a stripper and a robot, who are by definition never supposed to look up. The visitor is no longer in control of the situation, creating the awkwardness that is at the core of the work.

ALICE HALDENWANG, LAURA COUTO ROSADO AND TINGTING ZHANG

Telepathy 2012-2112
“TELEPATHY” immerses the viewer in the heart of a fiction where telepathy would become the predominant means of communication at the expense of means of current communication. The ten glass helmets enable to visualize a telepathic communication, by definition invisible. “TELEPATHY” proposes to reverse the current trend which consists in basing its communication on technology, and in exchange it reveals the parapsychological and subjective communication of psychic phenomena.

ARNE QUINZE

Арне Куинз
Chaos Life
The composition of a Chaos artwork started as a self-portrait; the representation of what’s going on in his head. But soon a shift occurred towards an enduring research on the definition of chaos in society. Often these artworks are filled with a mass of small wooden sticks attached to each other, looking enormously chaotic. “There’s no chaos, only structure” is a tagline in some of his work expressing his inner self and how he describes his thoughts. To him there is no chaos, everything is structured even in the chaos you find structure. There’s no such thing as chaos in Quinze’s world or at least not in the sense of how society defines chaos. Chaos does exist, as a form of structure. Chaos is irretrievably linked with life. In life everything is a matter of rhythm. Something without a rigid structure is part of the organic order in life.

BILL VIOLA

比尔•维奥拉
빌 비올라
ביל ויולה
ビル·ヴィオラ
Билл Виола
An Ocean Without a Shore

First displayed in the deconsecrated church of San Gallo during the 2007 Biennale of World Art held in Venice, Italy, Ocean Without A Shore is comprised of over 240 minutes of high-definition content displayed on 65″ and 103″ plasma displays. The work is displayed in a fully synchronous yet constantly evolving format, as individuals continuously transition through a remarkable world of Viola’s creation.

RAYMOND QUENEAU

雷蒙格诺
レイモン·クノー
רמונד קנה
Раймонд Кено
OULIPO
Cent mille Milliards de poèmes
Since its arrival (the Oulipo), the rules of the group were set out as follows: “We define potential literature as the search for new forms and structures that can be used by writers in the way they will most like.” “Potential” refers to something that exists in power in literature, that is, that is found within language and that has not necessarily been explored. The favorite tool for study and production is the contrainte, an arbitrary formal restriction that can create new procedures, new forms and literary structures that can generate poems, novels, texts. Over the years, dozens of different contraintes have been explored, from those somehow related to the riddle, such as the palindrome, the acrostic, the lipogram, of which the playful aspect has certainly not been underestimated, with forms more directly related to the codes of exact sciences, such as combinatorial calculus, set theory or graph theory. Among the numerous definitions of the Oulipo provided by the members themselves, one is very elegant and significant: “An Oulipiano is a mouse that builds the labyrinth from which it is proposed to come out later”. Queneau often explained that some of his works might seem simple pastimes, simple jeux d’esprit (mind games), but he remembered that topology or number theory also arose, at least in part, from what was once called “funny mathematics“.