Ephraim Henry Pavie Architects and Design

Ephraim Henry pavie, french borned architect has definitly freed his concepts from the regular geometrical constraints. First there are the free shapes, the smoothness of the curves and openings, and the shiny and polished skin of his “handmade” pieces. Inspired by the art of feng shui, the shape of his architecture is like an interface between the inside energies and the outside natural environment. The architect’s creative work has been published in national and international magazines, online and on national television.

Candeğer Furtun

Untitled
Candeğer Furtun employs traditional ceramic techniques in order to examine and portray the human body. She often works with reproductions of individual body parts, which are then combined so that an individual fragment can represent the whole, or suggest a larger scene, history, idea or space. Having studied arts and crafts both at home and abroad in the 1950s and 1960s, her eye towards her own culture is of an insider as well as an outsider.

D.A.ST. ARTEAM: DANAE STRATOU AND ALEXANDRA STRATOU

Desert Breath

I imagine two parallel realities in the way that we view the world. There is the world inside and the world outside of us. It is through the senses that we are able to connect the inside to the outside world. My whole life, including the choice to become an artist, has been an attempt to re-search, to understand, and to connect these two parallel realities. To bridge what is within to what is without…
Naturally my works are triggered or have a point of departure either in the external or in the internal world. Initially, an idea is generated in the form of an internal image, which in turn needs to be answered intellectually and put into context. This process seems to me to have its point of departure in the world of the subconscious, which then surfaces into the conscious realm. Following from there, the initial idea decodes itself as it evolves into realisation and ends up ‘translating itself’ in to an artwork. It is a bit like a journey, which slowly reveals itself as I journey towards it.

Jonna Kina

Arr. for a Scene

“The sonic force of cinema’s most famous murder scene is investigated.Two foley artists recreate Hitchcock’s shower sequence, deconstructing the associations of aural signifiers, and the synesthetic power of sound. Jonna Kina contextualize this uncanny phenomenon — the “trans-sensory” quality of sound – within both Kina’s oeuvre, as well as other historical and contemporary works inside and outside the realm of art. In Arr. for a Scene (2017), Kina explores the structures and forms of cinematic sound – transforming an iconic image — the horrific shower scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho (1960) – into the sonic frequencies of quirky, seemingly innocent, domestic objects.” Melissa Ragona

 

TARIK KISWANSON

Father Form
Each “Father Form” becomes a sort of portal, a vessel for a trance-like experience. Upon entering, the spectator will become multiplied, obliterated, and disjointed by the multiple reflections. This sensation is amplified by the profound sonority of the work. These sculptural vessels blur the boundaries between inside and outside, opening and enclosure, the individual and the collective.

WORAPONG MANUPIPATPONG

SPACE INBETWEEN
The series of spatial structures are a combination and overlapping of basic architectural-elements (roof, floor, wall, window, and ladder) and furniture feature (platform with different level for seating, laying, leaning). The shape and form represent contemporary architecture with simplicity of form but complex spaces. These structures can be seen as a transition between inside and outside. It provides variety of posture and different level with intimate space.

JULIAN MAYOR

Graziano Chair
The Graziano chair was inspired by computer generated wire-frame models, and by toughness coupled with fragility. Wire frame drawings express form though an economical use of marks, and with their own set of codes, they allow a viewer to look at the inside and outside of an object at the same time, and from many angles simultaneously.

WORAPONG MANUPIPATPONG

Space Inbetween
“The series of spatial structures are combination and overlapping of basic architectural-elements (roof, floor, wall, window, and ladder) and furniture feature (platform with different level for seating, laying, leaning). The shape and form represent contemporary architecture with simplicity of form but complex spaces. These structures can be seen as a transition between inside and outside. It provides variety of posture and different level with intimate space.”

haris epaminonda

le plateau
The exhibition at le plateau marks an important and new step in Epaminonda’s practice, which, as the title suggests, shall be seen as one large work building up over time through different volumes and chapters. For this occasion the artist has devised an extensive environment that occupies the cleared spaces of le plateau with a series of cubicles, platforms and screens conceived both as sculptures and presentation devices. Including other elements, films and sound—the soundscapes of the installation will be composed by the music duo “Part Wild Horses Mane On Both Sides”, with whom the artist often collaborated in the past—, the whole set exceeds the exhibition space itself with parallel and temporary appearances connecting the inside and outside of le plateau. Like an emphatic homage to the Japanese filmmaker Yasujiro Ozu, these performed interventions shape a kind of inhabited archipelago in constant evolution.

OLAFUR ELIASSON

オラファー·エリアソン
اولافور الياسون
奥拉维尔·埃利亚松
אולאפור אליאסון
Олафур Элиассон
Your Rainbow Panorama

Olafur Eliasson’s dazzling “Your Rainbow Panorama” is a permanent installation on the rooftop of the ARoS Museum in Aarhus, Denmark. The spectacular work of art has a diameter of 52 metres and is mounted on slender columns 3.5 metres above the roof of the museum. Visitors can literally walk through the entire color spectrum viewing the world for the first time in all pink, green, blue and yellow tones.
“Your rainbow panorama enters into a dialogue with the existing architecture and reinforces what is assured beforehand, that is to say the view of the city. I have created a space which virtually erases the boundaries between inside and outside – where people become a little uncertain as to whether they have stepped into a work or into part of the museum. This uncertainty is important to me, as it encourages people to think and sense beyond the limits within which they are accustomed to moving”. -Olafur Eliasson

Leo Villareal

Point Cloud
Point Cloud (ASU) is a newly commissioned artwork by Leo Villareal designed specifically for the ASU Art Museum in the Nelson Fine Arts Center. During his visit to the ASU Art Museum, Villareal was inspired by the museum’s architecture, designed by Antoine Predock in 1987. Villareal used mobile 3D scan technology to map both the inside and outside of the building, creating over 200,000,000 data points. The artist then manipulated the data points with his own custom software to create this public artwork. This is the first time Villareal has used actual data sampled from a location as part of an artwork.

Ief Spincemaille

Reverse Blinking
Imagine that your head is captured inside a photo camera. It is completely dark. Only when the shutter opens en closes, you see the world in a flash. The shutter moves so fast that nothing has time to move. Everything where you point your gaze at, becomes like a photograph. A memory. Something that has been, but isn’t anymore. You see people as frozen figures, whole streets as untouched moments. Life as a sort of dia show. “Reverse Blinking” creates this experience. It is a completely closed helmet with two shutters in front of the eyes. They are controllable by the user. Reverse Blinking works on batteries and can be freely used in or outside the museum. It is best used where there is a lot of movement and people. “Reverse Blinking” is part of a series of art works, through which the artist tries to add video and photographical effects to our natural way of seeing.

Pablo Valbuena

Array [wave]
Wave depicts a sculptural volume unfolding over time – the Shape of Light seized in perpetual movement. It uses ephemeral and intangible materials – light and sound – and can be traversed by the observer, immersing them into the shapes cast by the undulating light columns. The work creates a malleable experience of scale: it shifts between object and environment depending on the observer’s position inside, outside, or at the boundary of the installation.

Michael Perl & Christian Zwerschina

A gate between illusion and reality. An invisible border between the inside and the outside. The walk-in installation IF exaggerates both subjective and objective sensory and spatial perception, offering time to find ourselves and position.

KATAGAI Hazuki

Accessories for Wearing Emotions
Head Accessory of Tears
I have heard somewhere that it is not yet fully understood why people shed tears.
We shed tears when feeling sad, moved, sometimes happy.
I do even when feeling angry.
We cannot control our emotions.
They sometimes cannot be stopped from overflowing to the outside even before we internally register them although they should exist within and surely derive from the inside of us.
It is as if they do not even pass through our brain – As if it is an involuntary action,
like in sports, where the body moves before we tell it to.
However, what would happen when we trace the process in reverse?
I tried to make it work from the outside in.
(Like, we sometimes pretend to be okay with an unwilling smile.)
I want to see what would happen on the inside of us if we “wear” emotions on the outside.
Hazuki Katagai

NEIL HARBISSON

Hearing Colors

Every colour has a different vibration, meaning different paintings, images or even faces have a different note or sound.
This audio input was once worn on the outside of his head, but now it has been implanted inside his skull – much like a cochlear implant – he has a greater depth of colour perception.
The new wi-fi and bluetooth connectors in the chip also means he will be the first person in the world to experience an image without actually seeing it for himself.

FELIX KLEIN

克莱因瓶
Klein’s bottle

The Klein bottle is a non-orientable surface; informally, it is a surface in which notions of left and right cannot be consistently defined.Simplifying things: A Möbius strip is a simpler example of a non-orientable object. That means it has no inside or outside. Add another aspect – having no boundaries – to it, it gets more complex and you end up with a Klein bottle.

FABIANO ONÇA & COLMEIA

Tantalus Quest
file festival

Game designer Fabiano Onça conceived the game, in which people must fill geometric shapes with their own silhouettes (as captured by webcams hanging from the ceiling): Software was built with OpenFrameworks, which is to C++ what Processing is to Java. A prototype was built with Flash (AS3), but it was slow — reading pixel values (BitmapData.getPixel) can be processor-heavy. Thanks to OpenFrameworks, porting the AS3 code to C++ was quite easy. The application is very simple: the images captured by the cameras are brightened, blurred and thresholded, resulting in black blobs. The amount of blob pixels inside the geometric shape count as positive points and the pixels outside the geometric shape count as negative points.

Daniel Ramos Obregón

OUTROSPECTION
This project has taken as a starting point the concept of “Outrospection” initially introduced by philosopher Roman Krznaric, where he proposes that in order to know oneself one must live towards the outside, it is be experiencing life that one discovers and shapes oneself. I have appropriated his concept while relating it to out-of-body experiences more commonly known as astral projections, by seeking to represent -in a metaphorical way- the mind being projected inside out of the body as a way of self-expresion and representation.

Luiza Kurzyna

Sunset Park
Luiza Kurzyna is a Brooklyn-based artist working on both paper, and immersive sculptural installations. Inspired by relationships within nature, Luiza combines the many ways that living things relate to each other (for example, through touch, mating rituals or gender roles) with elements of fantasy. Growing, bulging and decaying forms give objecthood to emotion and life’s transitions. The fantastic elements are intuitive, abstract; they create a space where the emotional inside can merge with the physical outside.

Szilárd Cseke

Multiple Identities, Sustainable Development
The focus is on multiple identities. There are pale, milky plastic pipes attached to the ceiling of the concrete interior, inside which, moved by fans, roll white balls. One after the other. If the one arrives, a new one is sent to another tube.Such works breathe inner unity. This closeness is sometimes a closeness, if not encryption. Because the language of contemporary installation art is foreign and difficult to read. The viewer’s gaze likes to evaluate subjectively and is always shaped by environmental influences such as culture, trends, styles, beliefs, experiences and politics. This makes the interpretation uncertain, it becomes subjective, often tempting to misconduct. Because anyone who claims that the work of art is created in the eye of the beholder and means that everyone, regardless of where they come from and how educated, can make a valid statement about a work of art is wrong. What Marcel DuChamp meant is that it unfolds in the eye of the beholder. But this development should not mean that simply opening the eyes also brings with it knowledge and insight. These qualities are developed through active participation, through perception. This, in turn, is not only feasible through the visual stimulus in the eye. It is possible, however, if you know who the artist is, what he is doing, what he wishes to express and with which underlying design principles the view is guided in what way to what. Only then does the processing take place, a connection of the causal relationships, which ultimately leads to art in the eye of the beholder. To an inner feeling outside of the spontaneous feelings.

CARSTEN HÖLLER

卡斯滕·奥莱
Карстен Хеллер
Aquarium

Aquarium proposes the direct contemplation of the link between the human being and the animal kingdom far from any anthropocentric perspective. For this, the artist arranged a fish tank with three holes underneath, so that the spectators could notice – lying down – the behavior of aquatic life from another point of view, influenced by the hypnotic pattern created by the fish in the water. . The public, being “submerged” and exposed only to what they can see inside the tank and the sounds that can seep in from the outside, are immersed in a separate reality.