Gary Hill

Cutting Corners Creates More Sides
A spoken text …rummages through piles of surplus; boxed accouterments and that unaccounted for miscellanea… and the uneasiness of language itself as it grapples with the whereabouts of the necessary words. The narrative debris morphs through manifolds of optical glass with each utterance marking points along the way. On a long, black tableaux two cameras with little or no depth of field, sentence by sentence cut through a mysterious world of a seemingly inconsequential lineup of objects, tools, parts, bits and the unidentifiable forgotten –whatever might have been close at hand becomes enfolded in a richly colored crystalline doppelgänger image. For each sentence and “drilling” through the objects, the cameras’ parallaxes have been adjusted for a different cross section—the point where momentarily a continuous horizontal view is possible only to then quickly deconstruct as quickly as it formed. The object/installation itself is a self-contained self-reflexive mobile surface complete with positional projectors and screens and a narrow black “runway” of sorts reflecting the initial process of recording.

Mathias Krissmer

II00II0I0I00II000I
“Krissmer’s ‘Kinetic Paintings’, explore visual composition, movement and scale in a way that thrills and disorientates. They are an optical experience simultaneously aesthetic and perceptual. The digital projections can be taken to any scale making them architectonic and potentially intimate. Their focus on a geometric language set in dynamic movement creates a certain sculptural juxtaposition, enhanced by the predominant use of black and white. The occasional introduction of bright colours further dramatises the Krissmer aesthetic. These are works that inspire, that must be experienced by the mind and the body.”

Thomas Depas

Princess of Parallelograms
What will happen when our imagination itself is externalized in machines? Artificial intelligence constructs its own world-truth that is beyond our sensory perception. Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) use algorithms to synthesize and generate images in a completely new way. These images have almost uncanny aesthetic characteristics, seeming to emerge from an ocean of data, a kind of pixel soup. Rather as if we were observing the emergence of artificial thought.” The machine learns to understand the “essence” of a thing, be it an animal, the face of a celebrity or a body of text. It is then able to generate new images of this thing, including faces of celebrities who do not exist, mutant animals, or new texts. Eventually, AI will be capable of instantaneously and dynamically emulating all representations. The era of the optical machine and the capture of reality will then be at an end, supplanted by the era of machines that generate their own reality.

Whyixd

Through the Membrane
We define the space around us by observing and perceiving light and shadow. That is to say, our perception shapes our basic understanding of this sensory world, and hence the “reality” we believe in. If our experiential knowledge and awareness of space are challenged, would our definition of a “real phenomenon” also be changed? Through the Membrane utilizes optical polarizers to change how light passes through space. The installation does not rely on any electromechanical devices. Simply with creative use of material and structure, it presents a super-sensory experience in space where reality and illusion are inextricably juxtaposed.

Lucid Creates

Futures
Futures uses the optical illusions created by light, sound and mirrors to transport audiences to a place where good things have happened and the future we want exists now. Futures is an immersive space in which audiences experience illusions that can reveal everything from how they process space and time to their perception of consciousness. It is a modular light installation that takes a number of forms. It is shown here as a walkway of mirrors and lights, tunnelling inwards towards a vanishing point.

Stelarc

Re-Wired / Re-Mixed: Event for Dismembered Body
“Re-Wired / Re-Mixed: Event for Dismembered Body” was a five-day, six-hour a day internet enabled performance, that explores the physiological and aesthetic experience of a fragmented, distributed, de-synchronized, distracted and involuntary body – wired and under surveillance. The artist wears a HUD (head up display) that enables him to see with the “eyes” of someone in London, whilst hearing with the “ears” of someone in New York. The body is also augmented by an 8 degrees-of-freedom exoskeleton so that anyone anywhere can generate involuntary movement of his right arm, using an online interface. The artist becomes optically and acoustically de-synchronized and performs partly involuntarily.

EMILIJA ŠKARNULYTĖ

Mirror Matter
In the neutrino observatory rendered in Mirror Matter, slow panning movement gives a sense of the immensity of the nearly 13,000 photo-multipliers that inhabit this strange vessel – their ‘eyes’ engineered to watch light. Another frame depicts the Hadron Collider at CERN; its architecture envisioned through lidar scans, producing a dynamic, transparent imprint in three dimensions. Described as a vision that flows through the body, it is imagined by Škarnulytė as alien archaeological vision’ with the ability to see through, and as the experience of sight farthest from the human realm. Through simultaneous perspectives, the constant surveying motion that weaves a continues thread through each video narrative, and the immersion generated by the reflective black ceiling, the viewer is imparted with this panoptical mode of perception.

ASTRID KROGH

Mare Tranquilitatis

Mare Tranquillitatis – the title of this optical fibre sculpture of cosmic dimensions refers to a lunar mare that is situated within the Tranquillitatis basin on the moon. Very slowly and barely perceptible, this work takes on varying hues of yellow and white, creating the strange and poetic impression that the work is actually breathing,imitating the sensation that the moon is actually alive in the night sky.

Vincent Leroy

Bubbles in Canyon
Paris-based artist, Vincent Leroy, has taken his characteristic use of levitating orbs to bryce canyon in the USA. This conceptual project, titled ‘bubbles in canyon’ imagines a mass of transparent spheres suspended in rotation between the cliffs. The installation hopes to offer viewers the opportunity to contemplate nature through an optical effect.

KUNIHIKO MORINAGA

森永邦彦
쿠니히코 모리나가
くにひこ もりなが
КУНИХИКО МОРИНАГА
Anrealage

Kunihiko Morinaga, the creative director of cult Japanese label Anrealage, has a thing for sensations and optical illusions. His debut Paris show last season was about light and shadow. Today, his sophomore outing focused on light and dark. Or, better, on the impressions you get from flashing or projecting light in pitch black. The Anrealage sculptural silhouettes were cut in a special black fabric that revealed a printed texture only under ultraviolet lights, or had needle-punched white circles—like a spotlight projection—splattered across the front. To emphasize the depth of such darkness, everything was black, including models’ faces, a heavy stroke that made things a little too dramatic.

Jeremy Shaw

towards universal recognition

“Shaw  presents Towards Universal Pattern Recognition, a series of archival photographs framed under custom-machined prismatic acrylic. The works, which he calls optical sculptures, depict people in transcendent states accessed through prayer, dance, yoga and the like. They act as a preview to the videos, which are projected in meticulously constructed spaces, each with eight office chairs facing a single screen.” Diana Hiebert

karolina halatek

halo
The title of the work HALO refers to the natural optical phenomena seen around the sun or moon, produced by light in the interaction of ice crystals. The first references of the atmospheric phenomenon can be found in a section of the “Official History of the Chin Dynasty” (Chin Shu) from 637, on the “Ten Haloes”, giving technical terms for 26 solar halos. In the exhibition, the place of the celestial body is given to the art viewer, who becomes a central part of the piece.

FELICE VARINI

Felice Varini est un grand maître dans l’art complexe de l’illusion d’optique. Depuis 1979, ce peintre suisse utilise l’architecture comme toile de fond. À partir de relevés, il définit un point de vue à partir duquel la forme, toujours géométrique, pourra être vue dans son ensemble par le spectateur. Lorsque l’on se déplace, une infinité d’autres points de vue se créent pour offrir de multiples lectures de la forme déconstruite.

ADAM FERRISS

“Adam Ferriss is one of those technologically-minded creatives who is able to put his ever-growing knowledge of code and processing to use building aesthetically wondrous digital art for the rest of us to enjoy. His images make me feel like I’ve just taken some psychedelics and stepped into one of those crazy houses you get in funfairs, where there are giant optical illusions on every wall and the floor keeps moving under your feet, except these are made using algorithms and coding frameworks […]”

Felipe Pantone

Chromadynamica
Pantone’s work deals with dynamism, transformation, digital revolution, and themes related to the present times. Felipe Pantone evokes a spirit in his work that feels like a collision between an analog past and a digitized future, where human beings and machines will inevitably glitch alongside one another in a prism of neon gradients, geometric shapes, optical patterns, and jagged grids. Based in Spain, Pantone is a byproduct of the technological age when kids unlocked life’s mysteries through the Internet. As a result of this prolonged screen time, he explores how the displacement of the light spectrum impacts color and repetition.

CLAUDIA COMTE

HOW TO GROW AND STILL STAY THE SAME SHAPE
If Comte’s sculptures are rooted in the naturalness of biomorphic forms, her mural interventions transform surfaces into optical sequences and infinite graphic signs with a digital age aesthetic. The monochromatic vocabulary that invests all her work brings her visually close to the abstraction of Sol LeWitt, Bridget Riley and even John Armleder, an artist with whom she studied. On the occasion of her exhibition at Castello di Rivoli, Comte has carried out a gigantic mural intervention consisting of eleven individual wall paintings specially designed for the galleries on the third floor of the historic residence. Also inspired by some eighteenth-century decorative motifs present on the ceilings and walls of the main museum building, the work develops repeated modules through space.

Filip Custic

(ego hiperrealista) + (juguete del viento) =
Custic combines models, costumes and various other objects that inspire him, using them to give form to abstract concepts surrounding humanity and its evolution. Spirituality, religion, relationships and sexuality are all explored through a lens preoccupied with fragmentation, pataphysics, optical balance effects and technological art.

DAN CORSON

Empyrean Passage

Empyrean Passage is reminiscent of both a theoretical black hole and portal into the celestial worlds. Empyrean (notice the pyre in the word) is the final and fiery level of heaven as depicted by Dante- or aether in Aristotle’s cosmology. The form is constructed like a giant hoopskirt and gracefully moves in the wind creating a gossamer lighting effect overhead. While this project is an oculus to the heavens, more focus is usually paid to more terrestrial stars in this neighborhood.The interior of the spiral is designed with aqua and black dashes. The dashed interior creates optical effects with the eyes and at certain times of the day shifts your perception of the sky’s color.This project utilizes extremely “green” electroluminescent lighting. The entire sculpture consumes less electricity than a household nightlight and operates on a photo cell. Special thanks to the City of West Hollywood, Andrew Campbell, Maria Lusia de Herrera, Greg Coons, Glen Bundrick / Luminous Film.

JEN STARK

جين ستارك
仁斯塔克
ジェン·スターク
ג’ן סטארק
젠 스탁
Джен Старк

American artist Jen Stark was born in Miami, Florida in 1983 and received her BFA from Maryland Institute College of Art in 2005. Her kaleidoscopic artwork brings to mind fractals, rainbows, geodes and topographic maps. Her ideas are based on replication and infinity as well as hypnotic, optical designs that mimic mandalas and sacred objects.

ALEXA MEADE

Алексе Мид
human portrait (paintings with real Humans)

Rather than creating representational paintings on a flat canvas, Alexa Meade creates her representational paintings directly on top of the physical subjects that she is referencing. When photographed, the representational painting and the subject being referenced appear to be one and the same as the 3D space of her painted scenes becomes optically compressed into a 2D plane.

Isabelle Andriessen

Dissonant Equilibrium
Isabelle Andriessen is a visual artist born in the Netherlands (1986). She studied at the School of the Arts Institute of Chicago and the Gerrit Rietveld Academie (NL), where she received her BFA in 2013. Currently she is an MFA candidate at Malmö Art Academy (SE). She lives and works in Amsterdam and Malmö. She is a recipient of the Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds Fellowship. Her work consists sculpture, installation and performance and has been presented in places like Optical Pavilion, Moscow, Unfair, Amsterdam and Mediamatic Amsterdam. Her work has been presented in online art magazines like Metropolis M and Mister Motley. In July 2014 her work has been mentioned in VOGUE Russia. Recently she has been collaborating with the Dutch National Ballet. Her recent work concern the sensory experience examined through light installations and performances.

Tobias Putrih

Re-projection: Hoosac

Influenced by the utopian projects — and notable failures — of innovative artists and designers such as Buckminster Fuller, Frederick Kiesler, and Charles Eames, Tobias Putrih likens his works to experiments, or design prototypes. His use of cheap materials, including egg crates, cardboard, and plywood signify both a sense of potential and impending collapse. Many of the artist’s works reference the architecture and spectacle of the cinema: a space suspended between fantasy and reality, image and environment. With Re-projection: Hoosac Putrih distills the cinema to its most basic element: fishing line stretched across the gallery mimics the conical trajectory of a beam of light. A spotlight hits the strands of monofilament which in turn become a screen, reflecting an image in illuminated dots. Inspired by the Hoosac Tunnel just east of North Adams — a storied, engineering marvel that draws ghost-hunters to the area — Putrih’s tunnel is, likewise, both real and a representation, an optical trick that invites both wonder and investigation.

DILLER + SCOFIDIO

The Blur Building (an architecture of atmosphere)
The Blur Building is a media pavilion for Swiss EXPO 2002 at the base of Lake Neuchatel in Yverdon-les-Bains, Switzerland.From piles in the water, a tensegrity system of rectilinear struts and diagonal rods cantilevers out over the lake. Ramps and walkways weave through the tensegrity system, some of them providing a counterweight for the structure. The form is based on the work of Buckminster Fuller.The pavilion is made of filtered lake water shot as a fine mist through 13,000 fog nozzles creating an artificial cloud that measures 300 feet wide by 200 feet deep by 65 feet high. A built-in weather station controls fog output in response to shifting climatic conditions such as temperature, humidity, wind direction, and wind speed.The public can approach Blur via a ramped bridge. The 400 foot long ramp deposits visitors at the center of the fog mass onto a large open-air platform where movement is unregulated. Visual and acoustical references are erased along the journey toward the fog leaving only an optical “white-out” and the “white-noise” of pulsing water nozzles. Prior to entering the cloud, each visitor responds to a questionnaire/character profile and receives a “braincoat” (smart raincoat). The coat is used as protection from the wet environment and storage of the personality data for communication with the cloud’s computer network. Using tracking and location technologies, each visitor’s position can be identified and their character profiles compared to any other visitor.In the Glass Box, a space surrounded by glass on six sides, visitors experience a “sense of physical suspension only heightened by an occasional opening in the fog.” As visitors pass one another, their coats compare profiles and change color indicating the degree of attraction or repulsion, much like an involuntary blush – red for affinity, green for antipathy. The system allows interaction among 400 visitors at any time.Visitors can climb another level to the Angel Bar at the summit. The final ascent resembles the sensation of flight as one pierces through the cloud layer to the open sky. Here, visitors relax, take in the view, and choose from a large selection of commercial waters, municipal waters from world capitals, and glacial waters. At night, the fog will function as a dynamic and thick video screen.