Ka Fai Choy

Synchrometrics

Can we design future memories for the body?
Is the body itself the apparatus for remembering cultural processes?Prospectus For a Future Body proposes new perspectives on how the body remembers and invents technological narratives. Central to the project is the study of body movement in dance: How it can evolve, adapt or re-condition to possible futures?Eternal Summer Storm explores the concept of muscle memory transfer as an alternative form of interactive cultural continuities. This concept prototype speculates on a future digital library of body movements or dance techniques that can be experienced beyond the audio-visual conventions. Eternal Summer Storm attempts to recreate legendary Japanese dancer Tatsumi Hijikata’s Butoh dance choreography and experience in ‘A Summer Storm’ (1973) from archival footages.Bionic Movement Research is a collection of experiments on the process of designing digital muscle memory for the body. Inspired by Luigi Galvani discovery (1780) of animal electricity in the human body, these experiments appropriate the techniques of electrical nerve stimulation to choreograph artificial muscle contraction and body movement.

The End of Time

TIMELAPSE OF THE FUTURE: A Journey to the End of Time
We start in 2019 and travel exponentially through time, witnessing the future of Earth, the death of the sun, the end of all stars, proton decay, zombie galaxies, possible future civilizations, exploding black holes, the effects of dark energy, alternate universes, the final fate of the cosmos.

CHIU CHIH

Voyage on the Planet
Designer Chiu Chih imagines a possible future where our cities have fallen into disrepair and the air is poisoned. In this wasteland, a woman wanders through the rubble, breathing with the help of a companion plant. The project, titled “Voyage on the planet,” consists of a clear box worn like a backpack. Two breathing tubes connect a face mask to the box. Inside, the box holds a potted plant, acting like a portable filter.

NIXI KILLICK

Future-Tive Nature
Progressive magnetism between the present and radically expansive possible futures, collaborative cognition with technology to extend imagination and construct new adjacent universes of creative pastiche both practical and psychological. Leveraging technology in the cultivation of empowered articulation within creative expression. The Future-tive Nature collection is concerned with material compilations. Looking at intimate junctions between technology and artisanal based practices to create intricately layered surfaces.

Marek Walczak & Martin Wattenberg

Thinking Machine
file festival

A map is created from the traces of literally thousands of possible futures as the program tries to decide its best move. Those traces become a key to the invisible lines of force in the game as well as a window into the spirit of a thinking machine.

DOMINIK STRZELEC

FREESTYLE WANDERING MACHINE
Driven by its immediate surrounding, little by little, the machine deposits material while sensing and moving within its territory. Traces left by its passing alter the landscape it operates within, step by step. Instant decisions solidify, aggregate and therefore shift or constrain its possible future trajectories.

USMAN HAQUE & NATALIE JEREMIJENKO

ウスマン·ハック
Flightpath

“Flightpath Toronto’s swarms of flying people experiment with an urban-scale participatory proposition: one that demonstrates the pleasures of emissionless urban mobility and creates a shared memory of a possible future. Flightpath Toronto is a collaboration between Usman Haque, architect/artist and Natalie Jeremijenko, engineer/artist, uniting his expertise in participatory urban spectacle with her expertise in bird flight and urban natural systems.”A panoramic 4-loop animation showed imaginative 3D-generated city featured some art projects by Usman Haque and Natalie Jeremijenko from a “flyer” ‘s point of view. Images of the art projects gradually appeared in each loop.

HAUS-RUCKER-CO

하우스-루커-코
是由豪斯拉克科
“Climate Capsules: Means of Surviving Disaster”

In view of the advancing climate change, the exhibition “Climate Capsules: Means of Surviving Disaster” at the Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg poses the question: “How do we want to live in the future?” and draws attention to the socio-political consequences of coexistence under new climatic conditions. In view of the fact that the politicians are hesitant to enforce strict measures for climate protection and the citizens very sluggish about changing their habits, the change appears inevitable. The world community is accordingly confronted with the challenge of investigating various possible means of adapting to the climate change. This exhibition is the first to bring together historical and current climate-related models, concepts, strategies, experiments and utopias from the areas of design, art, architecture and urban development – pursuing not the aim of stopping the climate change, but envisioning means of surviving after disaster has struck. More than twenty-five mobile, temporary and urban capsules intended to make human life possible independently of the surrounding climatic conditions will be on view – from floating cities and body capsules to concepts for fertilizing sea water or injecting the stratosphere with sulphur. A symposium, film programme, readings, performances and workshops will revolve around the interplay between design processes and political factors such as migration, border politics and resource conflicts, and investigate the consequences for social and cultural partitioning and exclusion.