Quadrature

Supraspectives
In the process of creating Supraspectives, the artist duo Quadrature has gathered the data of 590 (recent & former) spy satellites, whose trajectory the installation follows. A third of them can be considered space trash, as they are obsolete or damaged, but still, they continue overflying us. The installation calculates the paths of all those satellites in real time and speculatively reconstructs the view they are capturing, offering artistically intervened images of what the satellites could be observing. Mainly satellites passing near the exhibition venue are selected, combined with other specially interesting or suggestive satellite images. Additionally, a specifically built motorized antenna on the roof connects live with the satellites overflying Tabakalera, transforming their real radio signals into sound. Everytime the installation connects with a satellite, the screen shows the data relative to it, such as country of origin or year of launch.

Roman Ermakov

Роман Ермаков
live sculpture

Our perception — the only true reality. Creation as a feeling that generates the image, expressed in the form. Beauty manifesto calling to go beyond that limit imagination. The aesthetics of art can not be reduced to a clear set of building blocks with which you can strengthen or weaken the perception of contrast. Beauty should not be subjected to analysis, that is communication and the call to participate in the transformation of the emotional to the visible.The process of creating — is the alignment of the mosaic, many repetitions of simple and pure elements, which form a collection, harmonious in its incompleteness.

Lin Hwai-min

White Water and Dust
Set to the piano scores by Erik Satie and other composers, White Water is a lyrical dance of pure movement that flows beautifully as its title suggests. The curtain opens to a projected colour image of a flowing river; it slowly transforms into black and white. In serenity and in turbulence, whiteness of waves and ripples streams out of the blackness. Green netting and girds used for digital design interrupt the flow of water, thus revealing the process of creating virtual images and illusion of light, providing a pleasant surprise to the dance.
Cloud Gate
Cloud Gate is the name of the oldest known dance in China. In 1973, choreographer Lin Hwai-min adopted this classical name for the first contemporary dance company in the greater Chinese-speaking community.

Nir Arieli

“Dancers are performers, the process of creating a still image gives them a similar satisfaction to the one they get when the lights come up on stage […] The camera functions as the audience. They are eager to actively contribute to the success of the work. I’m often working with them in a very abstract way of directing, and they are able to translate my words into physical states.”

danny karas

sofi

in analysis of the modern skyscraper there is traditionally an aesthetic agenda that localizes itself in a “shoes” or “hat” location. The tower typology has ignored the possibility of a center distortion. This distortion acts as an aesthetic element as well as an organizational(programmatic) locator. By designing from the middle out there is a chance for the building to better blend with its context by keeping the processional elements in the center. Entrance and roof conditions mimic their tower brothers and give a moments rest in the exuberance of design. This proposal creates a center distortion and layers form through a simulation of gravity and the“claspyness” of the outer skin. The inner void acts as a way of creating a Secretary oriented office program rather than a traditional first floor security, freeing up the center of the building to the public. The project looks to rationalize itself through components rather than a monolithic form.

ANDY LOMAS

Morphogenetic Creations
Created by a mathematician, digital artist and Emmy award winning supervisor of computer generated effects – Andy Lomas, Morphogenetic Creations is a collection of works that explore the nature of complex forms that can be produced by digital simulation of growth systems. These pieces start with a simple initial form which is incrementally developed over time by adding iterative layers of complexity to the structure.The aim is to create structures emergently: exploring generic similarities between many different forms in nature rather than recreating any particular organism. In the process he is exploring universal archetypal forms that can come from growth processes rather than top-down externally engineered design.Programmed using C++ with CUDA, the series use a system of growth by deposition: small particles of matter are repeatedly deposited onto a growing structure to build incrementally over time. Rules are used to determine how new particles are created, and how they move before being deposited. Small changes to these rules can have dramatic effects on the final structure, in effect changing the environment in which the form is grown. To create these works, Andy uses the GPU as a compute device rather than as a display device. All the data is held in memory on the GPU and various kernel functions are called to do things like apply forces to the cells, make cells split, and to render the cells using ray-tracing. The simulations and rendering for each of the different animated structures within this piece take about 12 hours to run, Andy explains. By the end of the simulations there are over 50,000,000 cells in each structure.The Cellular Forms use a more biological model, representing a simplified system of cellular growth. Structures are created out of interconnected cells, with rules for the forces between cells, as well as rules for how cells accumulate internal nutrients. When the nutrient level in a cell exceeds a given threshold the cell splits into two, with both the parent and daughter cells reconnecting to their immediate neighbours. Many different complex organic structures are seen to arise from subtle variations on these rules, creating forms with strong reminiscences of plants, corals, internal organs and micro-organisms.

Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

Bilateral Time Slicer
A biometric tracking system finds the axis of symmetry of members of the public and splits a live camera image into two slices. With each new participant time slices are recorded and pushed aside. When no one is viewing the work, the slices close and rejoin creating a procession of past recordings.

VICTORINE MÜLLER

维克托里娜米勒
‘I’m interested in creating moments of sensitivity, moments when our defenses are down and we are open to new things. moments of powerful concentration. … I create zones, put forward pictures, show processes that touch the viewer, that invoke associations on various levels, transport people into a different state, so that things hidden may become visible, accessible, opening up possibilities – to demonstrate something that is not said and cannot be said, but that is’.

Szymon Kaliski

Fabfungus
FabFungus is a physical installation inspired by questions of digital life and cellular growth. FabFungus is also a computational tool for creating digital structures grown out with a simulated process. It is also a manifestation of couple of these forms, brought to physical reality through imperfect 3D printing.

LEAH MEDIN

The Gold Divide
“I visualized The Gold Divide as a transparent wall; a large surface representing emotion and energy. The piece was inspired by my experiences studying abroad in Amsterdam, time spent at Haystack Mountain School of Crafts and the community at Massachusetts College of Art and Design. It was a cumulation of observations and experiences—like riding my bike through the city of Boston and seeing vast construction netting wrapped around buildings. These large surfaces of material triggered my fascination for creating work at an enormous scale. I reflected on process, on how something is made, and was further intrigued by the challenge and symbolism of independently sewing four hundred yards of fabric on a single industrial sewing machine.” Leah Medin

Nicolas Bernier

frequencies (light quanta)

The project is part of an ongoing process entitled «frequencies», exploring basic sound and light dichotomic systems. Here, frequencies (light quanta) stems from a fascination towards science, light, and granular synthesis allowing to create clouds/grains of sounds. The conceptual focus lies in the quantum — the smallest measurable value of energy —, on the smallness of matter. The whole project is based on the possible conceptual relationships between basic quantum physics principles applied to the audio-visual creative process: particles, probabilities, wave/particle duality and discontinuity. Metaphorically structured around these notions, the audio-visual composition stems from 100 sound and light micro-sequences that develop themselves, generating an ever expending but yet disruptive form in time and space. With the use of randomness, the vectorial graphics are always creating new ways to look at the visual, physically superimposing pattern images.

Adam Ferriss

Glitch art
Finding his own niche between new media arts and conceptualism, Adam Ferriss creates unique digital coding that manipulates, distorts, and engineers images into psychedelic terrains. At times, his technicolor abstractions feel organic despite their technological roots – an ambiguous craft born of the RGB Tricolor separation process and pixel sorting algorithms he so carefully employs. Using these “procedural mechanisms,” Ferriss initiates iterative changes in light and pixel structure of his given source material – creating a literally infinite array of compositional possibilities that grapple with human perception during an era of ubiquitous manufacture.

Steve Reich

スティーヴ・ライヒ
סטיב רייך
스티브 라이히
СТИВ РАЙХ
Pendulum Music

Reich came up with the concept while working at the University of Colorado. He was swinging a live microphone in the style of the cowboy’s lasso, and noting the produced feedback, he composed for an “orchestra” of microphones.Three or more microphones are suspended above the speakers by means of a cable and stand. The microphones are pulled back, switched on, and released over the speaker, and gravity causes them to swing back and forth as pendulums. As the microphone nears the speaker, a feedback tone is created. Different lengths of cable will swing at different speeds, creating an overlapping series of feedback squeals. The music created is thus the result of the process of the swinging microphones.

THOMAS HEATHERWICK

Bombay Sapphire Distillery
The existing buildings at the complex were built during the Victorian era to house a mill that produced paper for English bank notes. The buildings were later abandoned and left derelict until the complex was bought by Bombay Sapphire, the gin brand owned by alcoholic drinks giant Bacardi, who commissioned Heatherwick to overhaul the site, creating a new distillery and visitors’ centre […] Two curving glass greenhouses form the major new additions to the site. Hot air is channeled into the greenhouses through large pipes clad in strips of metal, picking up heat produced during the distillation process and carrying it out through openings in the red-brick walls of one of the existing buildings.

Omar Victor Diop

The Studio of Vanities

Oumy Ndour – Journalist, TV Anchor, Movie Director

The result is a collection of individual portraits, striking and captivating in their charm. Diop carefully chooses backgrounds and patterns to strengthen the subject’s personality and cultural references. Therefore, the colour of kenté fabric flawlessly matches the outfit of casually posing fashion designer, Selly Raby Kane. The clothes of artist Mame-Diarra Niang and model Aminata Faye fuse with an African background pattern. Using this particular approach, Diop becomes part of a tradition of African studio photography epitomized by the likes of Malick Sidibé and Seydou Keïta. He honours their pioneering work in his own creations, making use of contemporary techniques. Instead of merely creating striking images of an attractive young generation, Diop defines the images during the portraiture process, ensuring that decisions regarding pose, background and props are taken together with the subject. This makes it possible for Diop to come closer to the essence of the portrayed individual, and therefore do justice to the multiplicity and energy of Dakar’s contemporary cultural scene.

James Webb

Untitled (Al Madat)
A recording of a Sufi dhikr undertaken by patients at the Sultan Bahu Rehab Centre in Westridge, Mitchell’s Plain. Dhikr (literally, “remembrance”) is a traditional Islamic recitation, where sacred names are chanted with special breathing techniques, often creating trance-like effects. This practice was brought to the Cape with the Malay slaves, and is now used by the rehabilitation centre as an augmentation to the curative process. “Al Madat,” the specific dhikr used for this installation, translates as “help,” and is here used to implore the Prophet for assistance.

TARO SHINODA

타로 시노다
Space camp site

Taro Shinoda (Tokyo, 1964) is an artist based in Tokyo. He started his career as an artist after educated in landscape gardening school. In considering the theme of “understanding the universe (including cosmic space) as a nature in process of evolution, in which nature coexists with human activities”, Shinoda has been creating sculptures, installations made or assembled by artist’s highly technique hand-built.

MARINA HOERMANSEDER

[…]Her first collection reflects her inspirational playground of sculpturing leather by moulding it to the body, twisting buckles, leather straps creating volume, a fabric made out of medical bandages and all over ruffled silk. This fashion statement comes along with a high level of quality and handcraft. A lot of the pieces are fully studded by hand and profoundly processed. The vegetably tanned leather is hand painted and one dress consists out of more than 100 meters auf silk strips. By adding accessories such as leather headpieces and armcuffs, she balances a striking inspiration to a high level of contemporary fashion.

Austin Houldsworth

Walden Note Money
The project imagines a payment system that challenges the established monetary function of ‘a store of value.’ Creating a new method of exchange that encourages people to actively destroy their money during a transaction. The process positively reinforces this behaviour through the creation of music, produced from the burning money within the transaction machine.

EXONEMO

Body Paint
series (white)

Exonemo’s work allows the public to take some sort of revenge at technologies that are increasingly complex and important in our daily life, demystifying it through destruction, error and mutation processes before eventually reappropriating it in a creative way. Akaiwa and Sembo never consider progress an end in itself, but as an ever changing tool retaining the power to break the conscience of both the artist and public, increasing it tenfold with a heavy dose of unexpected and creating a new beauty.

WIN VANDEKEYBUS & ULTIMA VEZ

SPIEGEL
‘I like to challenge my obsessions by imposing new rules on them,’ he says. The easy way is never an option: ‘I like things difficult, so as to be able to enjoy it afterwards and to be able to say that it was all worthwhile.’
Which is why, after 25 years of Ultima Vez, Vandekeybus still loves creating performances. ‘Sometimes I can’t face the start of the process. There’s always that stress and sleepless nights with five ideas running around in my head at the same time, but then the production’s own world takes shape and it instantly becomes captivating and fun again.’

Elizabeth Ogilvie

the liquid room

Elizabeth Ogilvie is a Scottish artist who uses water as a medium and as a research focus. Water is the obsession which returns in most of her works and it becomes experience through the use of installations and videos. Her work embraces universal and timeless concerns, offering her public an innocent pleasure and at the same time underlining philosophical and ecological issues.
Through her installations, the artist isolates water inside an artificial state, creating a process which highlights its fundamental qualities in order to return to its place of origin which is the natural habitat. Among her most important works there is Liquid Room realized in 2002. Inside a derelict warehouse the artist created basins with water which were crossed by a footbridge. By linking art, architecture and science, she realized an interactive installation where the visitor, walking on the footbridge, can touch the water, whose movement is reflected on the walls of the installation. In 2006 she created Bodies of Water, whose operation took over from her previous work.
Once again, through a series of installations, the public was able to share the experience of sensorial involvement within an environment dominated by water.

ROBERT WUN

last breathe

Robert Wun is a luxury fashion label, aimed to create ingenious garments with sophistication visions, to inspire independent individuals with originality beliefs. The chaos between Nature and artificial forms the centre of the design ethos, through resourcing in the novelty nature and the revolutionary artificial world, Robert Wun believe in such contradiction, promising ideas will be generated through the process of perplexity. Dictating the new ‘futuristic’ through innovative manufacturing yet with uncompromising attention to traditional values. Creating the harmony by combining enlightening ideas with sophistication craftsmanship, brining in a new dimension to luxury garments and also to the young London fashion industry.

JANE BENSON

The Splits (Rehearsal)

The Splits begins with the bisecting of various string instruments into two halves, cutting them along their length, creating two separate instruments. The two halves must then be played together to complete a tune and are, thus, for duets (or quartets, octets or dectets) only—pieces which she is creating in collaboration with musicians and composers. The act of splitting at once destroys the integrity of the instrument as an object, and disrupts the conventional process of aesthetic creation that the instrument traditionally permits. Splitting is not merely an act of destruction, however. Instead, it opens graceful passages for imagined evolution: the split instrument becomes a newly creative instrument, permitting the creation not only of new music, but new communities (visual artist, the composer, the musicians, and the audience). Ms. Benson has “split” two violins, a viola, cello and double bass: all, cheap, mass-produced string instruments made in China.