LAb[au]

What hath God wrought?
The title of the installation is a line from the Book of Numbers in early modern English. It was the first message transmitted by telegraph in 1844, the first communication technology on the basis of electricity and binary coding. The artwork is fed by the 100 most used words in Thomas More’s book ‘Utopia’, feeding the correspondence between a series of telegraphs. The telegraphs translate the words into sound and light. Written rolls of paper drift to the floor. Slowly but surely, mistakes slip into the closed system and the meaning of the words alters. The Morse orchestra deals with the rationalism of the Renaissance and its belief in progress and posits by contrast an aesthetic of a self-regulating system in which the fault rules and defect becomes beauty.

Art+com

Chronos XXI
Chronos the god of time, permanently destroys and recreates. He who symbolises evanescence and return, was the thematic point of departure for the creation of the kinetic media installation Chronos XXI. The piece is a ‘finger exercise on antiquity’ by our Creative Director Joachim Sauter and was created during his residency at Villa Massimo in Rome. A pendulum continuously swings in front of a monitor. This motion controls the slow synthesis and destruction of depictions of Chronos on the monitor. Chronos appears in various interpretations by painters of the late Renaissance, Baroque and Classicism – as a man who disrobes Veritas, as a performer of volatile music, or docking Cupid’s wings, or as children and crop eating, a scythe and an hour glass carrying, beardy and winged old man.
video

ELIŠKA SKY

Kingdom of Sport
Series Kingdom of Sport connects the reference to the traditional renaissance portraits and modern sport culture. It was inspired by the classic portrait painting and the greek mythology, especially visible in the short film. Each model demonstrates their constructed ‘royal’ character with one type of sport specialisation. Sport equipment is cleverly integrated into the styling, fashion accessories and set design.

guli silberstein

Field of Infinity

Inspired by both Italian Renaissance paintings and contemporary news broadcasts of protests at the border of Gaza with Israel – the work processes human gestures and figures in a landscape into a dark and colorful mix, opening up a series of reflections on the political image, the image of the political, the politics of the image, and the image of the image.

file sao paulo 2019 videoart

Irena Haiduk

Spinal Discipline
Irena Haiduk is the founder of Yugoexport, an oral corporation whose primary goal is to demonstrate how to surround ourselves with things in the right way. Her works have been heard or seen at the Kadist Art Foundation in Paris, The Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago, and the 14th Istanbul Biennial.

QUAYOLA

captives
“Captives is an ongoing series of digital and physical sculptures, a contemporary interpretation of Michelangelo’s unfinished series “Prigioni” (1513-1534) and his technique of “non-finito”.
The work explores the tension and equilibrium between form and matter, man-made objects of perfection and complex, chaotic forms of nature. Whilst referencing Renaissance sculptures, the focus of this series shifts from pure figurative representation to the articulation of matter itself. As in the original “Prigioni” the classic figures are left unfinished, documenting the very history of their creation and transformation.

David LaChapelle

ДЭВИД ЛАШАПЕЛЬ
ديفيد لاشابيل
大卫·拉切贝尔
デビッドラシャペル
Once in the Garden

LaChapelle and the organizers of the Life Ball revealed a new poster inspired by the theme of this year’s Life Ball, “The Garden of Earthly Delights.” The photographer captures Carrera fully naked, standing in a surrealist eden reminiscent of Hieronymus Bosch’s fantastic Renaissance paintings.Two versions of the poster show Carrera alternatively with female and male genitalia. “Gender lines are blurred and every person is unique in how they see themselves,” David LaChapelle explains. “For me the body is more than something to be looked at as an object of sexual gratification. The body is a beautiful housing for the soul that we are celebrating in this picture.”The tagline accompanying the photos, “I’m Adam, I’m Eve, I’m Me” also struck a chord with the model. “Your gender should not matter in your heart or in the way you express your personality,” Carmen Carrera says. “We shouldn’t be afraid to stick to a model, because there are so many types of diverse people on this planet. My message is: beauty has no gender. At the end of the day beauty is beauty.”

CAJSA VON ZEIPEL

Cajsa von Zeipel works in a large-scale format with explicit references to fashion as well as to the masters of the Renaissance. She models her over-dimensioned sculptures in Styrofoam and the final form is covered by a layer of plaster.

Thom Puckey

The Wife of the Alchemist
British sculptor Thom Puckey creates work that interestingly treads between old aesthetic sensibilities and materials and new content. Not unlike Renaissance sculptors, Puckey’s pieces are large, constructed out of marble, and often involve female nudes. Yet at the same time the objects presented in the sculptures are fiercely contemporary[…]

Simon Denny

Secret Power
In towering vitrines built from computer servers, Denny gathers images and ephemera from the Snowden leaks, the NSA’s design decks, and gaming visuals that inform the aesthetics of intelligence networks. Situated within the over-400-year-old Biblioteca Marciana, a lavish Renaissance repository for some of the world’s oldest maps and documents, the exhibition connects current intelligence networks to past systems of record-gathering.

Gwen van den Eijnde

Collage I
Gwen van den Eijnde is a genius costume designer whose intricately designed garments reflect his immeasurable creative capacity. His costumes evoke a charming spirit of dark romanticism that borders on the bizarre, while remaining gracefully enchanting and ever-innovative. Gwen’s costumes all have a unique contemporary twist that juxtaposes classically-inspired touches like crowns made from wooden piano keys, and abundant Renaissance period embellishments.

CAJSA VON ZEIPEL

Cajsa von Zeipel works in a large-scale format with explicit references to fashion as well as to the masters of the Renaissance. She models her over-dimensioned sculptures in Styrofoam and the final form is covered by a layer of plaster.

Adam Cvijanovic

Drawing inspiration from Renaissance fresco painting, Adam Cvijanovic’s ‘portable murals’ depict contemporary landscapes with a sense of celestial awe. Spanning 75 feet, Cvijanovic’s Love Poem captures the dreamy and disquieting essence of suburban Americana as a rapturous science fiction tableau. Envisioning sun-bleached L.A. ten minutes after the end of gravity, Cvijanovic’s utopia ascends in a whirlwind of consumerist ecstasy. Emulating movie backdrops as well as the acclivous perspective of cathedral dome tromp l’oiels, Love Poem… combines the sublime horror of disaster films with a majestic religiosity, as bungalows, Broncos, and palm trees are destroyed in the exaltation of their own perfectness. Painted entirely by the artist without assistants, on a plastic used by Fed Ex, Cvijavovic’s work reconstitutes the intimacy of timeless artistry with a modern day immediacy.

CAJSA VON ZEIPEL

Seconds in ecstasy
Cajsa von Zeipel arbetar i ett storskaligt format och med tydliga referenser till såväl mode som renässansens mästare. Hon modellerar fram sina överdimensionerade skulpturer i frigolit och den slutgiltiga formen täcks med ett lager av gips.