ScanLAB

Replica
We begin with a tour of a virtual 3D model of the London house-cum-museum built by 19th-century architect Sir John Soane. The journey traverses the five floors of the museum’s meticulously restored rooms, each filled with original and duplicate fragments of antiquity. Sir John Soane (1753-1837) was one of the foremost British architects of the Regency era, a Professor of Architecture at the Royal Academy, and a dedicated collector of paintings, sculpture, architectural fragments and models, books, drawings and furniture. Soane was awarded the Royal Academy’s prestigious Gold Medal for Architecture, as a result receiving a bursary (funded by King George III) to undertake a Grand Tour of Europe. His travels to the ruins of Ancient Rome, Paestum and Pompeii would inspire his lifelong interest in Classical art and architecture. As an enthusiastic collector, later in life he began to repurpose his home at Lincoln’s Inn Fields as a Museum for students of architecture. With a collection containing thousands of objects ranging from Ancient Egyptian antiquities and Roman sculpture to models of contemporary buildings, Soane’s house had become a Museum by the time of his death.

MATTHEW BIEDERMAN

Interference
La interferencia es una escultura que reflexiona sobre el comportamiento simultáneo de la luz como onda y partícula. La escultura muestra dos ondas de luz interferentes que lentamente se vuelven coherentes y luego se separan en diferentes escalas y frecuencias. La forma de la obra es una réplica a escala de una estructura de “pila de madera”, un cristal fotónico artificial que se utiliza para guiar y manipular la luz. Estos cristales imitan las propiedades que se encuentran en la naturaleza en forma de coloración estructural como algunas mariposas u ópalos y son observables como iridiscencia. Es una serie de LED programables que están cubiertos con filtros dicroicos para producir un efecto de colores cambiantes que cambian según la posición de los espectadores. El trabajo se inspiró en el programa de residencia “Scale Travels” en el Laboratorio Internacional de Nanosistemas Ibéricos, donde trabajé con el grupo de fotónica para estudiar las propiedades inherentes de la luz y el color. La observación de la obra por parte del espectador es a la vez una demostración de los fenómenos de las ondas de luz interferentes y la interferencia de las ondas de luz en sí.

Eugenia Bakurin

La trahison des tapis
The title is a reference to the famous work by René Magritte “The Treachery of Images”. Even though the video installation alludes to it, the viewer is immediately aware that this is not a real carpet. What you see is an animation, a digital carpet, its contemporary variant. However, the patterns of the replica show that it could have been made in the west of Iran. The movements, which appear surreal, are reminiscent of a state of intoxication. Whether this was triggered by drugs, or only arose from the lively imagination of a tired child, is left to the speculation of the viewer. The work reflects the importance of traditional arts and crafts in the modern digital world. It is the first of a series of digital carpets.
The animation has a realistic resolution of 4k, is 03:55 minutes, and runs in an infinite loop on a 65-inch display.

Troika

AVA

Ava’ is Troika’s first sculptural manifestation of their exploration of algorithms. ‘Ava’ is the physical result of emergence and self organisation brought about by ‘growing’ a sculpture through the use of a computer algorithm that imitates the emergence of life by which complexity arises from the simplest of things. As such the sculpture probes at the nature of becoming, existence and our strive to understand and replicate the complexities of life.In a landscape where our personal data is a raw material, and where we, humans, have become subordinate spectators of algorithms and a computerised infrastructure, we ask the question how much or little are we capable of influencing our surrounding reality, how much is predetermined, how much is down to chance.

WILLIAM FORSYTHE

平らなものを1つ再現
1970年代には早くも、ウィリアムフォーサイスは、アカデミックバレエの予想外の進歩でダンスに革命をもたらしました。他の人が古典的なジャンルから離れていたとき、彼は以前は欠陥があると考えられていた形で語彙を豊かにしました。ムーブメントはねじれ、曲がり、解体され、再組み立てされて別の部屋に置かれます。 2000年にフランクフルトバレエで初演された「OneFlatThing、replicated」は、この研究の範囲の終わりにあります。南極点への遠征に関する本に触発されて、フォーサイスはますます密集した振り付けを開発しました。それは、20の完璧に配置されたテーブルの真っ只中にある体の明らかな混乱で最高潮に達します。

STINE DEJA

Utero Termico
“Thermal Womb, una scultura di figura sospesa a testa in giù che richiama la pratica della crioconservazione. La struttura è infatti una replica del meccanismo utilizzato da aziende come Alcor, che prepara i corpi prima che vengano immersi nell’azoto liquido, figure congelate a tempo indefinito, in attesa che la tecnologia le raggiunga e le faccia rivivere. La componente cinematografica del lavoro rivela un paio di luminosi occhi blu, la cui unica animazione è battere le palpebre, aggiungendo uno strato basato sul tempo alla natura altrimenti statica del pezzo. Stephanie Cristello

Joe Hambleton

Stasis in Flux
“Stasis in Flux is an experimentation of animation’s potential to mimic the real. I began by building a functional zoetrope within 3D space to test if persistence of vision is replicated accurately. From this experiment I realized 3D animations potential to go beyond the physical limits of the real, allowing me to coordinate movements between both the camera and the zoetrope to replicate much more advanced cinematic techniques. The result is a carefully choreographed animation that represents the ebb and flow of the creative process.” Joe Hambleton

MOMOYO TORIMITSU

鳥光桃代
Miyata Jiro
“Miyata Jiro” by Momoyo Torimitsu is a life size replica of the typical Japanese businessman. Sporting a suit, glasses, and a receding hair line complete with a comb-over, Miyata has mechanically crawled the metropolises of New York, London, Amsterdam, Paris, Rio de Janeiro, and Sydney. With the aid of the artist in full nurse costume, the duo engages street and business life (Miyata has crawled the likes of Wall Street and La Defense — epicenters of business cultures as well as typical touristic destinations). The performance and audience reactions were videotaped and photographed and six monitors at the Dikeou Collection play the respective videos, each identified by a small flag for the country in which the crawl took place.

REVITAL COHEN & TUUR VAN BALEN

The Immortal
A number of life-support machines are connected to each other, circulating liquids and air in attempt to mimic a biological structure.
The Immortal investigates human dependence on electronics, the desire to make machines replicate organisms and our perception of anatomy as reflected by biomedical engineering.
A web of tubes and electric cords are interwoven in closed circuits through a Heart-Lung Machine, Dialysis Machine, an Infant Incubator, a Mechanical Ventilator and an Intraoperative Cell Salvage Machine. The organ replacement machines operate in orchestrated loops, keeping each other alive through circulation of electrical impulses, oxygen and artificial blood.
Salted water acts as blood replacement: throughout the artificial circulatory system minerals are added and filtered out again, the blood gets oxygenated via contact with the oxygen cycle, and an ECG device monitors the system’s heartbeat. As the fluid pumps around the room in a meditative pulse, the sound of mechanical breath and slow humming of motors resonates in the body through a comforting yet disquieting soundscape.Life support machines are extraordinary devices; computers designed to activate our bodies when anatomy fails, hidden away in hospital wards. Although they are designed as the ultimate utilitarian appliances, they are extremely meaningful and carry a complex social, cultural and ethical subtext. While life prolonging technologies are invented as emergency measures to combat or delay death, my interest lies in considering these devices as a human enhancement strategy.This work is a continuation of my investigation of the patient as a cyborg, questioning the relationship between medicine and techno- fantasies about mechanical bodies, hyper abilities and posthumanism.

Jonas Pequeno

Foley
Huxley-Parlour gallery presents a solo exhibition of new audiovisual and installation works by the London-based artist Jonas Pequeno. Comprising of three works, a kinetic sound installation Foley, a CGI video Ocean Scene Composite and a photographing print, and the act of appearing, the exhibition considers incongruity in digital fictional constructs. The title of the exhibition, /ˈfəʊli/, is a phonetic transcription of the word foley, a film-making technique used to manually mimic everyday sound effects in post-production when props do not acoustically match their real life counterparts. Influenced by the concept of foley, Pequeno’s work features an audiovisual installation that incorporates microphones and balloons swayed by a fan, replicating the sound of crashing ocean waves.

Peng Di

dementia simulator
This Dementia Simulator headset designed by Central Saint Martins graduate Di Peng lets wearers experience symptoms of the disease for themselves (+ movie). The helmet affects each of the senses, in an attempt to replicate many of the challenges faced by dementia sufferers. The translucent, egg-shaped device sits over the wearer’s entire head, and includes a mouthpiece, earpiece and screen that covers the eyes.

Stine Deja

THERMAL WOMB
“Thermal Womb, a sculpture of figure suspended upside down that recalls the practice of cryopreservation. The structure is indeed a replica of the mechanism used by companies such as Alcor, which prepares bodies before they are submerged in liquid nitrogen—figures indefinitely frozen, waiting for technology to catch up and revive them. The film component of the work reveals a pair of bright blue eyes, whose only animation is to blink, adding a time-based layer to the otherwise static nature of the piece.” Stephanie Cristello

Ricardo Barreto and Raquel Fukuda

Chess Auto-Creative (Self-Replicating )
‘Chess Auto-Creative (CHEAC)’, takes the form of a cube where each face corresponds to an 8 x 8 chessboard. The six chessboards can also be arranged in a line to make them easier to see. There are 16 white pieces and 16 black pieces on each of the chessboards, made up of elements such as: kings, queens, bishops, knights, castles and pawns, each of which moves according to the rules of the game. However, instead of the pieces being arranged as normal, they are first set out in patterns where each element is repeated […]Each time a piece is moved to a new position, symmetrically or asymmetrically, a new variation of proto-chess is produced – in other words, a new game emerges. All games generated in this way are, in principle, variations of proto-chess – including the official chess game itself. This means that ‘Chess Auto-Creative’ is not a variant of the official chess game, but its origin.

FILE SAO PAULO 2019

Haegue Yang

Boxing Ballet
Yang’s Boxing Ballet turns one half of the gallery into a reworking of Oskar Schlemmer’s 1922 costumed dance work Triadisches Ballett, with replicas of five of the Bauhaus teacher’s bulbous and exaggerated figures, from a female figure made of hoops to a circle that looks like a flattened stickman. Here, Schlemmer’s figures are reimagined as golden bell-covered shapes on wheels or wire frames hanging by a wire from the ceiling. As they all come with handlebars, it seems we are meant to provide the choreography, stiffly pushing, say, a giant roosterlike creature around like an awkward shopping trolley.

james turrell

جيمس توريل
詹姆斯·特瑞尔
ג’יימס טורל
ジェームズ·タレル
설치작품 제임스 터렐
ДЖЕЙМСА ТАРРЕЛЛА
Skyspace
Manipulating light as a sculptor would mold clay, James Turrell creates works that amplify perception. Unlike pictorial art that replicates visual experience through mimetic illusion, Turrell’s light works—one cannot call these shimmering events ”objects“ or ”images“—give form to perception more

lucy mcrae

future dayspa
The Future Day Spa is a personlised, physiological experience delivering controlled vacuum pressure to the body replicating the feeling of being hugged. Guided by a therapist, participants hand their bodies over to a part–human, part–machine process inducing a state of relaxation. A collaboration between Qualcomm’s Inventor Lab, we integrated technologies for capturing biometric data to understand the physiological benefits of a treatment.

Diemut Strebe

Sugababe
Sugababe is a living replica of Vincent van Gogh’s ear, grown from tissue engineered cartilage. It is composed of living immortalized van Gogh cells from a male descendant, containing natural genetic information about Vincent as well as genetically engineered components amongst using genome editing CRISPRCas9 technique, and most recent bioprinting technology.

Fritz Panzer

Фриц Панзер
In the 70s Fritz Panzer has started creating sculptures that were replicas of furniture and objects on a scale of one to one. His work offers an interesting experience that asks the viewer to rely on their own memory and recognition to complete the works, referring to outline drawings and to gestural drawings creating the volume of an object through his total silhouette. New spaces come into being, in which the artist makes an escalator, stepladder or desk grow out of the world and likewise into it, holding them poised between visibility and invisibility.

Zhan Wang

Flying Stone No.2
Zhan Wang’s most celebrated work to date is his series of “artificial rocks” – stainless steel replicas of the much-revered “scholar’s rocks” traditionally found in Chinese gardens. The mirrored surfaces of these often monumental objects absorb the viewer and its surrounding environment, enticing them to become part of the work, an abstraction and distortion of reality, thus creating a visual interplay between positions of tradition and modernity.

Thomas Feuerstein

PROMETHEUS DELIVERED

The marble sculpture PROMETHEUS DELIVERED – a replica of Prometheus Bound by Nicolas Sébastien Adam (1762) – is slowly decomposed by chemolithoautotrophic bacteria. The acidic process water from the bioreactor KAZBEK penetrates the body of the sculpture via tubes and runs off the surface of the stone. The limestone turns into gypsum while the sculpture slowly dissolves. The biomass of the bacteria is the energy source for human liver cells from which the organic sculpture OCTOPLASMA grows. Inorganic stone turns into organic meat. PROMETHEUS DELIVERED is a play on words, referring to birth in the sense of “delivery”, and to the central importance of the liver in myth.

JEN STARK

جين ستارك
仁斯塔克
ジェン·スターク
ג’ן סטארק
젠 스탁
Джен Старк

American artist Jen Stark was born in Miami, Florida in 1983 and received her BFA from Maryland Institute College of Art in 2005. Her kaleidoscopic artwork brings to mind fractals, rainbows, geodes and topographic maps. Her ideas are based on replication and infinity as well as hypnotic, optical designs that mimic mandalas and sacred objects.

Alex Chinneck

Covent garden
Wat je hier ziet is een replica van het marktgebouw die in de studio van Alex Chinneck is gebouwd. Door een speciale constructie aan de binnenkant van het gebouw lijkt het bovenste deel te zweven. De grote grap is dat het echte gebouw nog helemaal intact is, maar aan de andere kant van de hallen te vinden is op een identiek gebouw. Ondanks dat dit kunstwerk op het verkeerde plein staat trappen mensen massaal in deze geniale grap.

Dimitris Mairopoulos and Skylar Tibbits

Self-Replicating Spheres

Self-Replicating Spheres explores the processes of growth, encapsulation and division through macro-scale objects on an oscillating table. This project attempts to demonstrate synthetic cellular division and replication through non-biological physical objects, without the use of robotics. The individual spheres were created with a hollow shell and an arrangement of small metal spheres and magnets. This internal structure provides the force of attraction for growing connections, the flexibility and, ultimately, the capability to divide. By adding more spherical units and supplying energy in the form of the oscillating table, the system will continually grow and divide.

JENNIFER RUBELL

جنيفر روبل
제니퍼 루벨
ジェニファールベル
Portrait of the Artist

Jennifer Rubell, the American artist and niece of Studio 54 co-founder Steve Rubell, brings a maternal touch to this year’s Frieze Art Fair with her autobiographical piece Portrait of the Artist. The pristine white nude, cast from steel-reinforced fibreglass, reclines like an odalisque at the Stephen Friedman Gallery stand. The sculpture is a replica of Rubell’s own eight-months-pregnant body, except it is eight metres high: the large belly, which is carved out to leave an egg-shaped void, can accommodate a fully grown adult. Spectators are able to clamber into the artwork and curl up inside as if they are the artist’s unborn child.Rubell’s intention was to create a monumental gesture of unconditional motherly love. There is a feminist statement here, too: Rubell has appropriated a style and scale historically reserved for male leaders to show, she says, “an emotion that is intensely personal and un-heroic”. The artist adds that watching members of the Frieze audience enter in the sculpture’s womb is “tremendously satisfying” – in her eyes the enlarged form was “incomplete until the first viewer entered”. Amid the hustle of Frieze’s mini-city there is something undeniably appealing about the opportunity to put your feet up in the foetal position in the name of art. Not to mention the comfort factor.