RYOJI IKEDA

池田亮司
이케다 료지
Редзи Икеда
Transfinite
test pattern [n˚2] presents flickering black and white imagery that floats and convulses in darkness on two screens, one on the floor and another floor to ceiling, in time with a stark and powerful, highly synchronised soundtrack. Through a real–time computer programme, Ikeda’s audio signal patterns are converted into tightly synchronised barcode patterns on the screens. Viewers are literally immersed in the work, and the velocity of the moving images is ultra–fast, some hundreds of frames per second, providing a totally immersive and powerful experience. The work provides a performance test for the audio and visual devices, as well as a response test for the audience’s perceptions.

Ei Wada

Toki Ori Ori Nasu – Falling Records
In this work, open reel tape recorders are placed on top of high pedestals and, as they play back, the magnetic tape unspools down into plastic receptacle below. The tape that accumulates in the container piles up as time passes, weaving an unusual pattern in the space. When the tape stops accumulating it is wound back up at high speed to a symphonic soundtrack. The pattern that had existed until then is extinguished and a new pattern is then woven.
FILE FESTIVAL

Daft Punk

Electroma
DAFT PUNK’S ELECTROMA IS THE EAGERLY ANTICIPATED DIRECTORIAL FEATURE FILM DEBUT FROM GUY-MANUEL DE HOMEM-CHRISTO AND THOMAS BANGALTER, BETTER KNOWN TOGETHER AS DAFT PUNK. A PSYCHEDELIC VISUAL AND MUSICAL ODYSSEY, ELECTROMA FOLLOWS THE JOURNEY OF TWO ROBOTS ON THEIR QUEST TO BECOME HUMAN. FEATURING A STUNNING SOUNDTRACK WITH MUSIC FROM TODD RUNDGREN, BRIAN ENO, CURTIS MAYFAIR, SEBASTIEN TELLIER AND CHOPIN, ELECTROMA PLAYS OUT BEAUTIFULLY ‘LIKE MUSIC FOR THE EYES’.

Vangelis

Blade Runner
Vangelis’ soundtrack for Blade Runner remains one of the relatively few soundtracks to establish an enduring reputation as fine music in its own right. Vangelis, by mid-1981 when he was first invited to view a rough cut of footage from Blade Runner, was at the peak of his fame as a solo artist, following a half-decade long run of successful albums[…] Vangelis cleverly chose to adopt the film’s aesthetic as his own. The film wielded futuristic sci-fi to film noir detective drama and action, owing much to psychological thrillers or horror. The most obviously jarring example of how Vangelis simulated this approach was his commissioning of the ragtime jazz song ‘One More Kiss’, which he positioned at the very centre of his album of cutting edge electronica.

HANNAH WEINBERGER

汉娜·温伯格
When You Leave, Walk Out Backwards, So I’ll Think You’re Walking In

The visual aspect of the piece is reduced to the loudspeakers, which are placed in the rooms and echo absorbing curtains that are installed alongside the walls. By walking through the different galleries of the Kunsthalle, the visitors to the exhibition are meant to compose their own soundtrack.

TAO DANCE THEATER

6&7
Tao Ye rejects any attempts to harness his work to narrative, which is why he numbers his choreographies rather than naming them. Numbers 6 and 7 were choreographed one after the other, but are presented here as a single work. 6 takes us into a dark world: six black-clad dancers emerge out of a foggy landscape resembling smog-choked Beijing. They start moving with one ‘voice’, treading the ground firmly and dancing—chiefly with the upper part of their bodies—a ritualistic dance which stretches the human body to the very limits of its flexibility. An equally minimalist soundtrack and the exceptional lighting design of Sweden’s Ellen Ruge, a close collaborator of Mats Ek, who has done a lot of high-profile work here in Greece, complete the raw materials of this performance-experience.

ALEJANDRO JODOROWSKY

АЛЕХАНДРО ХОДОРОВСКИЙ
DUNE
When French producers asked Jodorowsky to adapt Dune, he was at the peak of his prestige.
…Jodorowsky’s Dune shows, the director managed to assemble a jaw-dropping group of talent for the film. This version of Dune was set to star David Carradine, Orson Welles, Salvador Dali and Mick Jagger. It was going to have Pink Floyd do the soundtrack. And it was going to have the then unknown artist H. R. Giger along with French comic BOOK artist Jean Giraud, otherwise known as Moebius, design the sets. Sadly, Jodorowsky’s grand vision proved to be too grand for the film’s financiers and they pulled the plug. The movie clearly belongs in the pantheon – along with Stanley Kubrick’s Napoleon and Welles’s Heart of Darkness – of the greatest movies never made. Compared to those other films, though, Jodorowsky’s movie sounds way groovier.

DANA CASPERSEN, WILLIAM FORSYTHE AND JOEL RYAN

White Bouncy Castle
The visitor’s unavoidable inclusion in the idiosyncratic kinetics of Dana Caspersen and William Forsythe’s «White Bouncy Castle» creates a choreographic space where there are no spectators, only participants. The choreography that appears, led by Joel Ryan’s encompassing soundtrack, is the result of complete physical destabilisation and the resulting social absurdity. The inadvertant euphoria that results from the situation is infectious and, in some cases, addictive.

POSTCOMMODITY

Do You Remember When?

The hole and exposed earth of Do You Remember When? becomes a spiritual, cultural and physical portal – a point of transformation between worlds – from which emerges an Indigenous worldview engaging a discourse on sustainability. The block of concrete on the pedestal – the foundation of the institution constructed on top of tribal lands – functions as a trophy celebrating Indigenous intervention in opposition to a Western scientific worldview. The closed-circuit audio broadcast of a Pee Posh social dance song performed by the collective provides the psychosocial soundtrack of the transformation process. The work shifts the sustainability from a focus dominated by Western science to a balanced approach inclusive of Indigenous knowledge systems.

HOWARD SHORE

The Hobbit An Unexpected Journey Soundtrack

DAVID CRONENBERG

ديفيد كروننبرغ
大卫·柯南伯格
데이비드 크로넨버그
דיוויד קרוננברג
デビッド·クローネンバーグ
Дэвид Кроненберг
eXistenZ
Soundtrack by Howard Shore