Shilpa Gupta

For, In Your Tongue, I Cannot Fit
‘For, in your tongue, I cannot fit,’ gives voice to 100 poets who have been jailed through time for their writing or their beliefs. The haunting work highlights the fragility and vulnerability of our right to freedom of expression today—and the bravery of those who struggle to resist. Visitors will encounter 100 microphones suspended over 100 metal rods, each piercing a verse of poetry. Over the course of an hour, each microphone in turn recites a fragment of the poets’ words, spoken first by a single voice then echoed by a chorus which shifts across the space.

Cheng Tsung-lung

Dans 13 Tongues
Choreographer CHENG Tsung-lung has always been fascinated by his mother’s stories about “Thirteen Tongues”: the street artist and legendary storyteller from their neighbourhood in Taipei was known for being able to slip into various roles. With his full-length work, CHENG succeeds in becoming a modern “Thirteen Tongues” himself: He transforms Taoist rites, festive parades and the bustling street life of Taipei into a fantasy world, blurring the past and the present, the real and the surreal. Against a mysterious soundscape of Taiwanese sounds, Japanese Nakashi melodies and the electronic music of LIM Giong, the dancers stomp and tremble in ecstasy like enchanted shamans in an endless festival.

danae io

The lips, the lisp, the slip of the tongue
The video explores voice modelling, voice donation, algorithmic prediction and the incomputable. The work examines in parallel the process of modelling the mouth to the process of modelling the voice, questioning modelling as a scientific/technological technique, by considering it as a means of producing reality, rather than merely an observational tool. What leaks from the model? Can the multiplicity and complexity of the voice be contained in an algorithmic model?
file sp 2019 videoart

JANINE ANTONI

جانين أنتوني
珍妮安东尼
ג’נין אנטוני
재닌 안토니
Жанин Антони
Mortar and Pestle
“The eye and tongue in “Mortar and pestle” could become the tongue and eye of any advanced intimate partnership.”
Since the 1990s, New York–based artist Janine Antoni has established an international reputation with labor-intensive projects in a wide range of media. She incorporates both art history and personal exploration, investigating the ways in which contemporary definitions of aesthetics and art making are connected to issues of gender identity and sexuality. Inspired by the feminist artists of the 1970s, she reframes and subverts art-historical and societal conventions surrounding women and beauty.

LAURA WAGNER

selfportrait with tongue
Selbstportrait mit Zunge is a video portrait that shows the artist in profile, wearing the traditional dress and hairstyle of her homeland, stretching out her tongue and moving it slowly. Mirroring the non-durational aspect of painting, a conventional means of portraiture, the work isn’t marked by beginning or end points. Selbstportrait mit Zunge challenges the notion of temporality as an essential component of video, a medium that is normally defined by the presence of durational elements.more

Genesis Belanger

Acquiesce
Genesis Belanger twists and stretches familiar objects into surreal scenarios with her stoneware, porcelain, and concrete sculptures. The Brooklyn-based artist frequently depicts detached limbs, misplaced teeth, and unusually located food in her work. One sculpture shows a mustard-topped hot dog disappearing into a handbag with a mouth-like zipper; another series dispenses rocks from dysfunctional quarter candy machines. This spring, a stoneware desk topped with flaccid pens, a tape-like tongue dispenser, and a drawer full of coping mechanisms was on view in the New Museum’s store window gallery.

Ieva Misevičiūtė

Performing Tongue PhD
Tongue PhD is a new eclectic solo performance by artist Ieva Misevičiūtė. This ambitious piece consists of ten chapters each investigating a different metaphoric lens of the tongue. Tongue PhD fuses elements of physical theater, academic reverie, dance and Butoh, structured in the format of a PhD dissertation. CREDITS concept, text, choreography and scenography Ieva Miseviciutè

SARAH MAPLE

Sarah Maple’s artwork is unfailingly bold and brave, not for the coy or faint of heart. These unflinching, occasionally even controversial, investigations into what it is to be a woman and a Muslim in 21st century Britain are made joyful by her own very personal brand of boisterous, tongue-in-cheek humour. more

olivia locher

I Fought The Law
In her “I Fought The Law” series, Olivia Locher has come up with a series of images that creatively poke fun at some of the more absurd laws in effect in the United States. Each photo is a tongue-in-cheek rebellion that intentionally violates some absurd U.S. State law, most of which are outdated or bizarrely specific.

MARIA MARTINS

“O impossivel”

They touch. They bite. They get warm. They penetrate. They are made. They get rid of. They stick their tongues in. They put the body in. They get body. They split up. They exist.
They want to be one. It is impossible (“O impossivel”). Which means that a single body, as you would like, is impossible. It can not. For a moment yes, for a moment they can. But no, they can’t. Impossible. They cannot be one. Despite the bites. Their bodies are different. They were born and will die self-absorbed, in themselves. Between them there is an abyss, a discontinuity. But they want to be continuous, they want their bodies to be one body. Since they cannot, they celebrate the sacrifice of the meat. “Essentially,” says Georges Bataille, “the field of eroticism is the field of violence, the field of rape.” Isn’t it violent, perhaps, to want to break the discontinuity of the other closed in on itself? Isn’t it violent to force the discontinuity of the other to be a continuous whole with him? O impossível by the Brazilian Maria Martins (1894/1973) shows the excesses of sex (take note: excess, sex). Or impossível is the moment in which the organs swell with blood and gush sexuality. The moment when animality makes us gloriously human.

BOHYUN YOON

БОХЬЮН ЮН
윤보현
Transparent Business Suit

“There is much to support the view that it is clothes that wear us and not we them; they mold our hearts, our brains, our tongues to their liking.” -Virginia Woolf. Uniforms group people in simplified versions of our social strata and take away our identity and individuality. In my transparent suit, I wanted to break the rigid impositions of the formal suit. Therefore, I juxtaposed the suit of a businessman and the naked body.

Eve Bailey

ИВ БЭЙЛИ
Tongue in Cheek
My work is based on the concepts of balance and coordination. The body interests me as a perceiving mechanical structure. I use my own body as a primary tool to create pieces that experiment with equilibrium through physical, mechanical, plastic and conceptual means. My studio practice is rooted in the tradition of the artist engineer. I design and build suspended and pendular constructions that can sustain their own weight and mine as I perform with them. By climbing and inverting on the structures, I challenge my own perception and creative process.
With the combination of the two mediums sculpture and performance, I seek balance in the mind versus body relationship. My work alternates between theory and practice. The intellect occurs in the engineering of my structures and the sensuality arises from my body in motion, bringing together two talents commonly thought as disparate: male versus female, rational versus instinctive. All my pieces are created upon contrastive ideas and principles. I constantly play with contradictions whether they are of visual, physical or conceptual nature.

DAMIAN ORTEGA

داميان أورتيغا
达米安·奥尔特加
דמיאן אורטגה
ダミアン·オルテガ
데미안 오르테가
Дамиан Ортега
Cosmic Thing
Mexican deassemblage artist Damian Ortega creates suspended sculpture, diagrams and manuals brought to life, exposing the inner workings and mystery of products and concepts. In the 2003 Venice Biennale, Ortega acheived international acclaim with his breakout hit, “Cosmic Thing,” which reassembled a Volkswagon Bug, the populist car manufactured in his home country. With roots in cartooning and satire, Ortega’s tongue in cheek works exemplify his former craft and present new perspectives to commonplace items. Get a look at several of the artist’s most famous installations here on Hi-Fructose.