Lotte Geeven

ECHO CHANT
In a universe from which no particle escapes, every voice eventually fades away. No matter how loud or often a call shouts or how urgent the message is. At least… in theory. But what about real life? As a roaring voice in full force rises from a protest over a square, it sets billions of atoms in motion above a crowd. “No justice, No Peace!” The message of vibrating particles charged with kinetic energy empowers the mass and shakes the established order on a verge of collapse. All according to the laws of nature. Dutch artist Lotte Geeven listened to these hotspots of change around the world after the streets and squares had been swept clean and silence had returned. Looking for an echo.

The Man from the 9 Dimensions

The Man from the 9 Dimensions

Based on the latest scientific data and hypotheses, Takashi Shimizu, the pioneer of horror movies, visualizes the world as theoretical physicists see it in order to create a new kind of science movie. The world’s first 3D full-dome movie on the “Theory of Everything”; the ultimate goal of physics to describe all natural phenomena by a single, consistent theory. Physics is in crisis. Our understandings of the microscopic world of elementary particles and of the macroscopic world of the universe are in contradiction. Scientists are striving to resolve the contradictions and construct the Theory of Everything. Be ready to be surprised by the new world of vibrating strings and hidden dimensions predicted by the most promising hypothesis, the Superstring Theory.

Scientific Advisor: Hirosi Ooguri

Director: Takashi Shimizu

Rio Wolta and Piet Baumgartner

Bittersweet tea symphony
Sound installation with 200 kettles boiling, vibrating, steaming. People come and go whenever they like.

Miharu Matsunaga

三春松永
МИХАРУ МАЦУНАГА

Japanese designer Miharu Matsunaga has followed in the footsteps of polka dot queen Yayoi Kusama and covered everything with dots! For her college graduation project Miharu created an elaborate body of work using pattern that engulfs every surface from the human body to entire rooms. The result is a vibrating decorative surface that references everything from topographical maps to an ultra zoom of skin pores.

Vasilis Asimakopoulos

“I am interested in the moment that stretches from “now” to the future. The interweaving web of images and possibilities connecting our world and the parallel. The trails of the heavy scent left from this point to tomorrow and right next to it. Dystopia. New life. Post-apocalypse. Growth. The descent. Love. Arsenic. Candies. And everything vibrating in between.”

Cerith Wyn Evans

СЕРИС ВИН ЭВАНС
ケリス·ウィン·エヴァンス
Form in Space…By Light

‘Cerith’s installation sits beautifully within the space, unfolding as you walk through,’ explains Clarrie Wallis, Tate’s Senior Curator of Contemporary British Art. The neon experience builds, from a single ‘peep hole’ ring in the South Duveens, through which you can glimpse swirls of radial light and an imposing octagon in the central gallery. The fractured neon fragments look like frantically drawn sparkler-lines on fireworks night.But there’s method and logic within these celestial scribbles. Hidden in the design are references to a host of highbrow sources, from Japanese ‘Noh’ theatre, to Marcel Duchamp’s The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass), 1915-23. Don’t worry if you missed them. The beauty of rendering precise (verging on obscure) references in such a celebratory neon explosion allows for multiple – if not endless – interpretations.Each way you look at the sprawling 2km of neon tubing, a different shape or symbol emerges. No small thanks to the elegant way in which the structures have been painstakingly suspended. ‘There were over 1000 fixing points, and obviously we couldn’t drill 1000 holes in the Grade II listed building,’ Wallis explains. ‘We had to work with structural engineers very intensely, so as to be completely happy and convinced that we would be able to remove it without damaging the fabric of the building.’Though it seems too soon to be discussing the installation’s removal, Wallis has a point. It’s a visibly fragile, delicate sculpture – whose impermanence makes it more intriguing. As it is a site-specific sculpture, it can’t be recreated elsewhere. What’s more, because the neon tubes are filled with a constantly moving stream of pulsing, vibrating gasses, visitors will never see the same sculpture twice.

MARSHMALLOW LASER FEAST MEMO AKTEN ROBIN

McNicholas and Barney Steel
Laser Forest

The public can explore the space, physically hitting, shaking, pulling and vibrating like trees for trigger sounds and lasers, provoking a very interactive collective experience. Resulting from the natural elasticity of the material, an interaction with the trees created with which they oscillate, creating patterns of vibration of light and sound. Each tree was tuned to a specific tone, creating harmonious children spatialized and played through a powerful surround sound system, and the more people, the cooler the experiment. The facility was designed to bring out in adults the feelings of curiosity and awe that are so vivid and evidence in children.

CHRISTOPH DE BOECK

timecodematter installation
In the interactive installation timecodematter the visitor enters an arena that is bordered with vibrating sheets of massive steel. The steel objects are pulsating with low frequencies and they react to the approach of persons. The acoustic energy in this installation is both penetrating and intangible: the resonant properties of twelve different steel sheets respond to the low frequencies and produce a conjuring effect.
Christoph De Boeck is part of the production structure ‘deepblue’.