KAZUHIRO KOJIMA

moon tensegrity membrane structure

kazuhiro kojima moon tensegrity membrane structure

source: architecturalgrammar

This is an experimental housing complex that sought to regenerate the shops-cum-houses in an old area of Hanoi, Vietnam. This district, popularly known as “the 36th street district”, is composed primarily of houses inhabited by traditionally large Chinese families. The buildings have narrow frontages and an unusually extended depth of 70-80 m. These high-density, low-rise buildings were considered to be a comfortable domestic environment until the changes of government in Vietnam during the 20th century.
Han,” became such a high-density city (1,000 people per hectare} that many families began to live together within one unit and even to transform courtyards into actual rooms. As a result the standard of living deteriorated.

The porosity of space: where the breeze comes through.

The objective of this project was to make a lowemission, 4-storey townhouse that would not rely on air conditioning. Instead. good natural ventilation was established within a high density environment. Were the renewal of the old city to progress in accordance with this model, our research shows that it would be possible to realise an environmentally friendly model for a compact city. The porous layering of Space Blocks would achieve this. However, this project was finally built within the University campus. The porosity ratio (exterior ratio) is 50% and the courtyards intertwine three-dimensionally with the building volume itself. The way of stacking the boxes was determined by CFD (computer fluid dynamics) analysis and by ensuring privacy between neighbours.
The wind analysis that we implemented in this project became a starting point for how we conceive of an architecture with “fluid direction”. This approach seeks to design by flow, rather than by the organisation of objects in space.
We were able to create fluid design by having air movement where it would seem no air could flow. People in this area have the experience and knowledge to use such exterior spaces for a variety of activities , such as dining . There are only a few courtyards that are open to the sky; all exterior spaces are filled with strong natural light, coming from the north. A flat double roof shape was adopted in this project, since the flat roof is traditional in Vietnam. a country that used to be a French colony. The double roof reduces direct heat loads. The size and shape of vertical slits on the upper surface of the roof were also determined by CFD.
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source: detail

Die japanischen Architekten Kazuhiro Kojima + Kazuko Akamatsu / CAt gehören zusammen mit Büros wie SANAA und Atelier Bow-Wow zu den wichtigen Architekturbüros der mittleren Generation in Japan, wurden jedoch noch nicht im gleichen Maße in Europa publiziert. Kazuhiro Kojima, der einstige Schüler Hiroshi Haras ist heute Professor an Japans neuem interessanten Architekturinstitut, der Yokohama Graduate School of Architecture.

Im großen Auditorium des Architekturgebäudes der TU werden Kazuhiro Kojima und Kazuko Akamatsu Entwurfsmethoden wie „Fluid Direction“ anhand ihrer aktuellen Arbeiten New Hakushima Station Project, Uto Grundschule und Nagareyama Schule, sowie anhand bereits bekannter Projekte wie Space Block in Hanoi, Vietnam (2003) und Liberal Arts & Sciences College in Doha, Katar (2004) vorstellen.

Ihr Entwurf für Ho Chi Minh University of Architecture (Holcim Award 2009) ist ab dem 18. Mai auch in der “Smart City – The Next Generation”- Ausstellung im Architekturforum Aedes zu sehen.

Für den temporären Pavillon MOOM entwickelten Architekturstudenten aus Tokio unter der Regie von Kazuhiro Kojima ein experimentelles, extrem leichtes Tragwerk – eine Tensegrity-Struktur aus einer Polyestermembran und Aluminiumstäben. Zwei Filme vermitteln einen Eindruck von den Aufbauarbeiten.

Kazuhiro Kojima wurde 1958 in Osaka geboren und schloss sein Architekturstudium an der Kyoto University (1982) und an der University of Tokyo (1984) ab. 1986 gründete Kazuhiro Kojima Coelacanth Architects, dessen Tokioter Büro sich heute CAt nennt (Coelacanth and Associates Tokyo). Kazuhiro Kojima ist Professor an der Y-GSA, Yokohama Graduate School of Architecture.

Kazuko Akamatsu wurde 1968 in Tokio geboren, schloss ihr Architekturstudium 1990 an der Japan’s Women University, Tokio, ab und wurde im gleichen Jahr Architektin bei Coelacanth Architects. Seit 2002 ist Kazuko Akamatsu Partnerin. Sie unterrichtet als Associate Professor an der Hosei University.

Eingeladen wurden Kazuhiro Kojima + Kazuko Akamatsu vom “Bild Wissen Gestaltung. Ein interdisziplinäres Labor” der Humboldt-Universität Berlin und von Finn Geipel, LIA, TU-Berlin.
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source: nomadaq

Levantado sin columnas y armazón estructurado que lo sostenga el pabellón MOON realizado por setenta estudiantes de arquitectura de la Universidad de Tokio, representa una propuesta de arquitectura experimental en la selección de los materiales y su disposción sobre el terreno la protegen de la exposición a elementos climatológicos.

Dirigidos por el arquitecto Kazuhiro Kojima perteneciente al estudio de arquitectura C+A coelacanth and associates, Moom se desplegó en una jornada en una parcela del campus universitario. Extendiéndose a lo largo de una franja de veintiséis metros de largo, Moom se extendio sobre una lona donde se realizo un montaje preliminar.

El volumen presenta una planta libre de elementos, su membrana exterior esta elaborada poliester elástico de 0,7 milímetros de espesor, en las que se injertaron barras de metal aplicando una formula que reproducía un relieve geológico, estos nodos colocados utilizando un sistema de tectónica de tubos que crean una estructura de tensegridad.

En este caso en vez de utilizar cables para equilibrar y evitar que la cúpula se deformara, era la cubierta la que cumplía esta función de comprension y tensionado de la estructura perfilando su estética inspiradas en formas estratificada. Las ciento treinta y una barras con las que se sustenta la carpa de varias longitudes no se tocan, creando una síntesis de la piel y de la estructura a través de un sistema de vainas en que los módulos estructurales se deslizan en función de la presión exterior ejercida por el viento.

En total Moom tiene un peso de seiscientos kilos, cubriendo un área de terreno de ciento cuarenta y seis metros cuadrados. el pabellón admite una amplia cantidad de luz mientras deliberadamente evita la radiación ultravioleta el efecto etéreo, tectónicamente se manifiesta como una franja de luz difusa. en la noche, la relación de los nodos y la piel se invierte creando un patrón de nervaduras fracturada.
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source: noticiasarq

El volumen de 26 metros de largo, de hasta 7,5 metros de ancho y 4,25 metros de altura, es autosuficiente y se compone de únicamente dos elementos: nodos de metal y una piel de poliéster elástico delicado, sólo 0,7 mm de espesor.

La estructura ventilada se construyó en un día, utilizando un sistema de tectónica de una membrana se tira sobre los tubos de aluminio que crean un sistema de tensegridad.

Las 131 barras de varias longitudes y no se tocan, optando por crear una síntesis de la superfice y de la estructura a través de un sistema de vainas cosidas en los módulos estructurales. El pabellón está anclado en la base como una tienda convencional con tubos de aluminio instertados como estacas. La forma total de pesa sólo 600 kg, sin embargo, cubre un área de terreno de 146 metros cuadrados. El pabellón admite una amplia cantidad de luz del día, mientras que deliberadamente blindaje contra la radiación UV, el efecto es una de etéreo, tectónicamente se manifiesta como una franja de luz difusa. Por la noche, la relación de nodo y la superficie se invierte y los nodos crear un patrón de nervaduras fracturadas.
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source: y-gsajp

The spaces people experience of course do not fall into neat categories such as buildings, cities, interiors and works of engineering. They appear to us simultaneously, and we pass through them seamlessly in the course of a day in no particular sequence. Classifications arise nonetheless because designers and architects are enmeshed in systems. Systems exert pressure through education, laws and other conventions. However, people who live and experience spaces could not care less about such things. Many constraints are imposed on those who would design.
Spaces can be described, for example, by activities. Activities constantly cut across boundaries. Air, light, water and forces (i.e. structure) do not respect boundaries either. By designing from such a point of view, I wish to consider a freedom that transcends fictional, necessary evils such as systems, education and laws.
Y-GSA is a place that has been carefully prepared for such experiments. The priority here is to be ready to deal with anything but to act with specific, immediate targets in mind. The question is how will things one has considered and practiced in a studio resonate in the world of today or the near-future.

Born in Osaka Prefecture, 1958. Completed master’s program, University of Tokyo, 1984. While in doctoral course in that university, jointly established Coelacanth in 1986 (later C+A; since 2005, CAt). Associate professor, Tokyo University of Science, 1994; professor, Tokyo University of Science, 2005-March 2011. Since April 2011, professor, Y-GSA. His many works include Utase Elementary School, 1995 (AIJ Prize); Space Block Kamishinjo, 1998 (ARCASIA Gold Prize); Space Block Hanoi Model, 2003; Liberal Arts & Science College, 2004; Ho Chi Minh University of Architecture, 2006~ (Global Holcim Awards Silver 2009).