HIROAKI UMEDA

holistic strata
Tokyo-based choreographer and video artist Hiroaki Umeda creates mesmerizing visual environments for his visceral solo works, appearing as a fine-spun swirl of movement in a digital storm of light and sound—an elusive figure, by turns frantic and still, awash in pulsating electronic waves. In a program of acclaimed companion pieces, Haptic and Holistic Strata, Umeda’s distinctive dance vocabulary draws on a range of butoh, ballet and hip-hop. He conceives his interdisciplinary events as a sensorial whole, creating the beats and sonic textures as well as the entrancing video and lighting effects. Designed to elicit primal emotion, Umeda’s work is minimalist and radical, subtle and violent, abstract yet precise, and thrillingly physical.

Godfried Toussaint

The Geometry of Musical Rhythm: What Makes a “Good” Rhythm Good? ” is a book on the mathematics of rhythms and drum beats. It was written by Godfried Toussaint, in order to study rhythms mathematically, Toussaint abstracts away many of their features that are important musically, involving the sounds or strengths of the individual beats, the phasing of the beats, hierarchically-structured rhythms, or the possibility of music that changes from one rhythm to another. The information that remains describes the beats of each bar (an evenly-spaced cyclic sequence of times) as being either on-beats (times at which a beat is emphasized in the musical performance) or off-beats (times at which it is skipped or performed only weakly). This can be represented combinatorially as a necklace, an equivalence class of binary sequences under rotations, with true binary values representing on-beats and false representing off-beats.

imagen: Ethan-Hein-blog

NANINE LINNING

Hieronymus B
Nanine Linning consciously leaves the beaten theatrical path with her artistic vision by intensely integrating dance, design, video, music, visual arts and fashion. Her extremely physical choreographies and out of the box events make reference to human instincts and emotions as well as aspects of cultural history and social criticism.

NICHOLAS CROFT AND MICHAELA MACLEOD

PINK PUNCH
The installation Pink Punch aims to attract visitors by its striking color, off the beaten path, through the shaped garden rooms, and into the forest. The new garden room uses the traditional technique of tree wrapping (used to protect trees from the elements) and the color pink to divide the “wilderness” from the garden, in a non-traditional way.

Fred Penelle & Yannick Jacquet

Mécaniques Discursives
This installation project has developed out of the encounter of the engraver Fred Penelle with the video artist Yannick Jacquet (Legoman). It is a mixture of engraving and video projection representing a sort of absurd and poetic machinery unfolding across walls like some exquisite corpse using the principle of a chain reaction as its starting point. Frédéric Penelle has been going to great lengths for a number of years to release engraving from its traditional context and “beautiful paper”. He uses his installations to breathe new life into engraving by moving it off a path that is too well trodden. As regards Yannick Jacquet’s work, this is marked by a desire to step outside of traditional projection formats and put video into space. The main tool is audiovisual performances, installations and stage design. Their shared desire to leave the beaten path of their respective disciplines brought them together in this project.

EUNHEE JO

New Tangible Interfaces TTI

Interactive surfaces makes everyday objects multi-functional and fun. Reactive technologies have now enabled normal interfaces with new functions and new possibilities. The role of the surface is changing radically, according to how it’s designed and incorporated with objects. My proposal was to re-define the role of the surface in future lifestyle, exploring how surfaces can be an integrated as part of a product or environment.

TTI, (standing for Tangible Textural Interface) is a new sound system that embeds a tactile surface. TTI has flexibility that enables people to physically touch and feel the response through the controls and physical morph of the surface. TTI delivers new aesthetics through integrated flexible surfaces as interface material unlike adapting conventional materials for interfaces such as plastic or glass. Unlike existing 2D interfaces, TTI has a curved 3D surface opening up new possibilities in making flexible forms and shapes within the interface.

TTI consists of 3 main functions, backwards and forwards, volume control and equaliser, having a physical feedback and control interface within one surface. As you control the functions, the left surface physically responds to the controls. Tactile surface also responds to the beat of the music.

Benedetto Bufalino

LABY-FOOT

As part of the 1 + 1 biennial, organised jointly by the Casino Luxembourg and the Fonds Kirchberg, the artist Benedetto Bufalino (born in 1982 in Décines; lives and works in Paris) was invited to submit a work for the plant labyrinth of the Kirchberg Central Park. The artist’s approach consists of investing urban space, playing with the architecture of given places and offering, with his funny or poetic installations, an offbeat reinterpretation of reality.
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L’installation Laby-Foot de l’artiste Benedetto Bufalino se trouve à proximité du Centre National Sportif et Culturel d’Coque à Luxembourg-Kirchberg. Comme son nom l’indique, Laby-Foot est un terrain de football réinventé pour le labyrinthe végétal du parc central du Kirchberg. Ses formes et ses matériaux insolites permettent au public de l’explorer, de participer à des matchs de football et d’en repenser les règles.

Anri Sala

Moth in B-Flat
“Moth in B-Flat is the most minimal expression of this moment, which in music could be identified as a pause, an offbeat, or a bridge-a passage that breaks with the previously established pattern and leads to a new movement.” Rudolf Frieling

CHRISTIAN BOLTANSKI

基督教波尔坦斯基
בולטנסקי
クリスチャン·ボルタンスキー
Кристиан Болтански

Homage

R.I.P 1944-2021

Preoccupied with collective memory, mortality, and the passage of time, Christian Boltanski creates paintings, sculptures, films, and mixed-media installations that approach these themes in a range of styles, symbolic to direct. Boltanski often makes metaphorical use of found objects, as in No Man’s Land (2010), an enormous pile of discarded jackets set to the soundtrack of thousands of human heartbeats, suggesting the anonymity, randomness, and inevitability of death. In Monuments (1985), electrical bulbs cast a seemingly bittersweet light on pictures of child holocaust victims. Describing his interest in personal histories, Boltanski has said, “What drives me as an artist is that I think everyone is unique, yet everyone disappears so quickly. […] We hate to see the dead, yet we love them, we appreciate them.”

Julien Mier, Magical Mistakes & Keita Onishi

Divide, Multiply
The King Deluxe label teamed up with animator Keita Onishi to create an innovative music video for ‘Divide, Multiply’[…] The final result is a seriously aesthetically pleasing work of videographic art, living up exactly to King Deluxe’s ‘audio-visual laboratory’ manifesto. With its geometric simplicity, and cog-like machinery driven by symmetrical beats, the video instills the utmost satisfaction deep within every viewer.

Iwai Toshio and Nishibori Ty

Tenori-On
Media artist Toshio Iwai and and Yu Nishibori of the Music and Human Interface Group, Yamaha Center for Advanced Sound Technology, have collaborated to design a new digital musical instrument for the 21st+century, TENORI-ON. A 16×16 matrix of LED switches allows everyone to play music intuitively, creating a “visible music” interface. It consists of a hand-held screen with a grid of LED switches, any of which can be activated in a number of ways to create an evolving musical soundscape. The LED switches are held within a magnesium frame, which has two built-in speakers located on the top of frame, as well as a dial and buttons that control the type of sound and beats per minute produced.

REVITAL COHEN & TUUR VAN BALEN

The Immortal
A number of life-support machines are connected to each other, circulating liquids and air in attempt to mimic a biological structure.
The Immortal investigates human dependence on electronics, the desire to make machines replicate organisms and our perception of anatomy as reflected by biomedical engineering.
A web of tubes and electric cords are interwoven in closed circuits through a Heart-Lung Machine, Dialysis Machine, an Infant Incubator, a Mechanical Ventilator and an Intraoperative Cell Salvage Machine. The organ replacement machines operate in orchestrated loops, keeping each other alive through circulation of electrical impulses, oxygen and artificial blood.
Salted water acts as blood replacement: throughout the artificial circulatory system minerals are added and filtered out again, the blood gets oxygenated via contact with the oxygen cycle, and an ECG device monitors the system’s heartbeat. As the fluid pumps around the room in a meditative pulse, the sound of mechanical breath and slow humming of motors resonates in the body through a comforting yet disquieting soundscape.Life support machines are extraordinary devices; computers designed to activate our bodies when anatomy fails, hidden away in hospital wards. Although they are designed as the ultimate utilitarian appliances, they are extremely meaningful and carry a complex social, cultural and ethical subtext. While life prolonging technologies are invented as emergency measures to combat or delay death, my interest lies in considering these devices as a human enhancement strategy.This work is a continuation of my investigation of the patient as a cyborg, questioning the relationship between medicine and techno- fantasies about mechanical bodies, hyper abilities and posthumanism.

OPN Studio

Give my Creation… Life!
Give my creation… Life! Is a project which links Art, Science and Technology. It is based on the generation of energy through the heart beating, with the aim of granting autonomy to a machine. During the research of this subversive goal, multiple issues have been addressed, such as the extension of a removed organ´s life, its artificial feeding of nutrients and its use as a source of natural energy, among others.

Moritz Simon Geist

Soft Manipulator
A playful interactive installation where the audience experiments with rhythms, mechanics and objects. Everyday items like glasses, pots, as well as small music instruments are placed on a light plattform. Seven robotic mechanic devices can be manipulated interactively by the audience, manipulating the sound of the objects. The six robotic mechanics beat the objects, creating a constantly changing polyrhytmic web of sound and rhythm.

DAITO MANABE

真鍋 大 度

One of the new technology projects from the programmer and artist Daito Manabe based in Tokyo, Japan, centres on experimental music performances and connects a person’s face to electric sensors. This innovative system lets you ‘play’ your face like a musical instrument with the help of facial movements that trigger sounds. Electrical stimulation makes a face twitch involuntary, each twitch matches the beat of the music.

 

John Tavener

Ikon of Eros

The tempo of the music changes frequently, illustrating love that at times may be almost austere and at other times ecstatic. In the second movement an ethereal female chorus is suddenly punctuated by deep percussion instruments and gives way to an almost erotic middle eastern beat, contrasting a pure spiritual love with a more physical, sensual form.

Bjarke Ingels Group

Steam Ring Generator

When BIG’s proposal for Amager Bakke, a plant that transforms waste into energy, located in Copenhagen, was released in 2011, many were skeptical about the project. Is it really possible to create a roof accessible to the public in an industrial building? Will they be able to make the plant’s chimney give off giant smoke rings (or rather, steam)? The idea seemed too good to be true.

TERMINALBEACH

The Heart Chamber Orchestra
File Festival – Hipersonica 

In the TERMINALBEACH Heart Chamber Orchestra (made up of artists Erich Berger and Peter Vatava), twelve musicians played pieces from the heartbeat, recorded by an electrocardiogram from data sent by sensors placed on their bodies. As the live score created in real time from the physical and emotional states of the musicians, their beats further influenced the resulting musical composition. In this way, the biological feedback loop becomes a self-generating, organic and evolving system, which creates a musical score and a show that adopts the form of open or network art, in which chance and interdependence, thus how emotional changes and computational reasoning create a biological and psychological dynamic at the same time.

Mariko Mori

Oneness
Oneness features two bodies of work, both related to the Wave UFO project. Oneness is a sculpture of six “alien” figures, linking hands in a circle. The aliens connote otherness, but are irresistibly attractive, encouraging the viewer to kneel down and hug them. When the viewer participates in the work by hugging the figures and welcoming them, the aliens’ eyes light up and their hearts start beating. When all six are hugged at once the base lights up as well. The figures are made with Technogel, a high tech flexible material molded onto a metal armature.

David Cronenberg

ديفيد كروننبرغ
大卫·柯南伯格
데이비드 크로넨버그
דיוויד קרוננברג
デビッド·クローネンバーグ
ДЭВИД КРОНЕНБЕРГ
eXistenZ
cinema

David Cronenberg’s eXistenZ is a creepily downbeat near-future techie thriller, starring Jennifer Jason Leigh as Allegra Geller, the super-cool games designer, who has just unveiled “eXistenZ”, a game you plug directly into your neuro-system and play in the infinite cyberspace of your mind.

BERNARDO SCHORR

Heart Pillow
File Festival
“Heart Pillow” is a transhuman artifact that reproduces a person’s heartbeat remotely and in real time. It allows the very pulse of life to be transferred into an everyday object – a pillow – making it serve both as an extension to the user’s body and as mimicry of life itself, playing with the perceptions we might have on how life can be defined. It raises interesting questions on the meaning of the words “emotion” and “affection” and their scalability to the various modes of interaction that may arise from an augmented object. “Heart Pillow” can be used in any situations in which transferring a heartbeat into an everyday object can be interesting or useful, such as connecting a couple that is apart, to calm down new born babies with the known feeling of their mother’s heartbeat or as an extension of the self into an everyday object as a mean of reflection.

SHANNON GOFF

Eggbeater
This Eggbeater by Shannon Goff catches the viewer’s attention by its sheer size. Also, the content of the sculpture, an eggbeater, is striking in such a large display. Few people have ever noticed the intricacies of an eggbeater, except perhaps those who engineer the machine. Thus, seeing such a large rendition gives importance to each wheel, each connection in this mundane contraption.

SyncDon II

Akihito Ito + Issey Takahashi
FILE FESTIVAL 2018
story changes in the body as it acclimates to a new rhythm. Participating in the installation can bring about unexpected emotional responses that also affect heart rate variability and, thereby, get recorded, too. The reason why the gift-box is used as an indicator of the heartbeat is because it is a metaphor of a “Gift.”more

SHARON EYAL & GAI BEHAR

CARTE BLANCHE – CORPS DE WALK
Corps de Walk combines shapes and emotions in a unique, almost extraterrestrial “walk” by androgynous creatures. It makes a number of references to Killer Pig, Sharon Eyal’s first choreography for Carte Blanche, created in 2009. In Killer Pig, a piece for female dancers, Sharon Eyal plays with multiple incarnations of sensuality with a minimalist style and intense physical expression. She pursues that approach in Corps de Walk, but this time will all the company dancers involved. As with the previous piece, the costumes suggest androgynous nudity. She has collaborated with the Israeli musician DJ Ori Lichtik for many years, and once again here his music underpins her potent choreographic language, whose rhythm constantly evokes a beating heart.

YURI SUZUKI

尤里铃木
يوري سوزوكي
beatvox
File Festival

By EPFL + ECAL lab in collaboration with Yuri Suzuki Direction: Nicolas Henchoz Designer: Yuri Suzuki Engineering: Gavrilo Bozovic, Fanny Riedo Software development: Gavrilo Bozovic, Fanny Riedo, Eric Morzier A microphone-controlled drumkit. Renowned as an artist for his projects questioning the materiality of sound, Yuri Suzuki has his own way of looking at augmented reality. For Berlin, he is creating an installation which will enable anyone to control a set of drums with their own voice. He harnesses the principles of augmented reality to interpret them in the realm of sound.

PETER FLEMMING

Instrumentation

Alle Dinge haben eine natürliche Resonanzfrequenz. Interessanterweise deutet dies auf eine grundlegende Verbindung zwischen fast allem hin, aber lassen Sie uns auf der Ebene des Physischen bleiben. Wasser in einem Weinglas vibriert stark, wenn ein Finger über den Rand gezogen wird. Unser Körper hat Resonanzfrequenzen; Ebenso der Hefter auf meinem Schreibtisch, die Wolkenkratzer in der Innenstadt, die Brücke, die ich beim Verlassen von Montreal überquere, und die tektonischen Platten, die alles tragen. Inspiriert von dieser Resonanz ist Instrumentation eine ortsvariable, kinetische Klanginstallation. Beim Betreten des Hauptinstallationsraums hört man eine schimmernde Polyphonie aus Harmonischen, plötzlichen Crescendos und arrhythmischen Beats. Im Widerspruch zur Eleganz dieser Klänge stehen die unwahrscheinlichen Resonatoren, von denen sie ausgehen und die aus Altholz, Klammern, Eimern, Trommeln, geborgenen Fenstern und handgewickelten elektromagnetischen Spulen zusammengeschustert sind. Weitere Erkundungen zeigen einen sekundären Raum, der die Quelle der Aufführung enthält: eine Reihe kleiner mechanischer Geräte und scheinbar zufällige Schaltkreise. Ein großer Holztisch dient diesen nichtmenschlichen Darstellern als Bühne: Ein Hebel zieht eine Schnur, die an einem Elektrodenkolben in einem Gefäß mit elektrifiziertem Salzwasser befestigt ist; Das Zifferblatt eines Lichtdimmers dreht sich langsam unter der Kontrolle eines kleinen Motors. Vibrierende elektromagnetische Felder erzeugen Klavierdrähte und erzeugen Schlagimpulse in Trommeln und Metalldosen. Joghurtdeckel, die an Stöcken befestigt sind, schwanken über Lichtsensoren hin und her. Diese Elemente bilden zusammen spontan den hypnotischen Refrain von Instrumentation. Um schwingende Magnetfelder zu erzeugen, verwende ich einfache Oszillatorschaltungen, Seltenerdmagnete und billige oder handgewickelte elektromagnetische Spulen. Diese Felder aktivieren eine Reihe von Materialien wie Glasschrott, Metallgegenstände und gespannten Draht. Mit lichtempfindlichen Fotozellen in den Schaltkreisen können die Frequenzen durch Umgebungslichtpegel variiert werden, die von den mechanischen Leistungsträgern reguliert werden – motorisierte Lichtdimmervorrichtungen und automatische Lichtblockierklappen. Zusammen mit Büroklammern, Blue-Tack und Heißschmelzkleber bewahrt das behelfsmäßige Erscheinungsbild der Anordnung einen Sinn für die Experimente, aus denen sie hervorgegangen ist. Die Gesamtästhetik ist insofern offen, als die zugrunde liegende Technologie so transparent wie möglich belassen wurde. Obwohl sie auf ungewohnte Weise verwendet werden können, stammen Hinweise von vertrauten Gegenständen; wie Nähmaschinenspulen-Elektromagnete oder Mülleimer-Resonatoren. In Verbindung mit dem überzeugenden Klang bieten häusliche Teile eine unmittelbare körperliche Auseinandersetzung mit ansonsten immateriellen Phänomenen. Ein primäres Ziel, das ich als Künstler habe, ist es, Systeme zu bauen, die ich nicht vollständig verstehe, mit Verhaltensweisen, die ich nicht vollständig vorhersagen kann. In Instrumentation überlappen sich die Zyklen, synchronisieren sich und treten aus der Phase aus, wodurch gemeinsam eine endlos schwankende Tonspur erzeugt wird. Sie wurden in den USA, Europa und Asien in Auftrag gegeben – alle sind ortsspezifisch und vom umgebenden Raum und der Landschaft inspiriert.

STELARC

drawing with robot arm
“With gene mapping, gender reassignment, prosthetic limbs and neural implants, what a body is and how a body operates becomes problematic. We generate Fractal Flesh and Phantom Flesh, extended operational systems and virtual task environments. Meat and metal mesh into unexpected and alternate anatomical architectures that perform remotely beyond the boundaries of the skin and beyond the local space it inhabits. The monstrous is no longer the alien other. We inhabit an age of Circulating Flesh. Organs are extracted from one body and inserted into other bodies. Limbs that are amputated from a dead body can be reattached and reanimated on a living body. A face from a donor stitched to the skull of the recipient becomes a Third Face. A skin cell from an impotent male can be recoded into a sperm cell. And more interestingly a skin cell from a female body might be recoded into a sperm cell. Turbine hearts circulate blood without pulsing. In the near future you might rest you head on your loved one’s chest. They are warm to the touch, they are breathing, they are certainly alive. But they will have no heartbeat. A cadaver can be preserved forever through plastination whilst simultaneously a comatose body can be sustained indefinitely on a life-support system. Dead bodies need not decompose, near-dead bodies need not die. Most people will no longer die biological deaths. They will die when their life-support systems are switched off. The dead, the near-dead, the not-yet-born and the partially living exist simultaneously. And cryongenically preserved bodies await reanimation at some imagined future. We live in an age of the Cadaver, the Comatose and the Chimera. Liminal spaces proliferate. Engineering organs, stem-cell growing them or by bio-printing will result in an abundence of organs. An excess of organs. Of organs awaiting bodies. Of Organs Without Bodies.” STELARC

ROGIER VAN DER ZWAAG

Nobody Beats The Drum – Grindin’