Aram Bartholl

Pan, Tilt and Zoom
Three motorized CCTV dome cameras are installed on the gallery floor. The built-in auto-tracking function makes the cameras follow any motion in the room. While moving its lens the center of the weight of the device shifts and the whole camera starts to roll on the floor. As a result the software is confronted with even more motion which needs to be tracked. From time to time the cameras bump into each other or start to follow and trigger each other movements.

LAUREN LEE MCCARTHY

Lauren
J’essaie de devenir une version humaine d’Amazon Alexa, une intelligence domestique intelligente pour les personnes dans leur propre maison. Le spectacle dure jusqu’à une semaine. Cela commence par l’installation d’une série d’appareils intelligents en réseau conçus sur mesure (y compris des caméras, des microphones, des commutateurs, des serrures de porte, des robinets et d’autres appareils électroniques). Je surveille ensuite la personne à distance 24h/24 et 7j/7 et contrôle tous les aspects de son domicile. Je vise à être meilleur qu’une IA car je peux les comprendre en tant que personne et anticiper leurs besoins. La relation qui s’en dégage s’inscrit dans l’espace ambigu entre homme-machine et homme-humain.

Behnaz Farahi

19Returning the Gaze
‘Returning the Gaze’ is an cyber-physical robotic installation by Behnaz Farahi supported by Universal Robots for ANNAKIKI’s Milan Fashion Week. ‘Returning the Gaze’ is an exploration of this scenario. In the center, a female model wears a spacesuit-like outfit and a headpiece fitted with two tiny cameras. The cameras track and capture the movements of the model’s eyes, and enlarging and displaying them on four monitors mounted moving around on robotic arms glaring back at the observers. The gaze of the model is thereby directed back at the viewer, extended and enhanced through cyborgian technologies.

SCANLAB

FRAMERATE
Created from thousands of daily 3D time-lapse scans of British landscapes, the work observes change on a scale impossible to see with the lens of traditional cameras. This is not just an artwork. The data collected and presented by FRAMERATE is ground-breaking scientific research, containing empirical, measurable facts. We glimpse a future perpetually documented by the eyes of a billion autonomous vehicles and personal devices, creating high fidelity spatial records of the earth.

Aleksandr Sokurov

ألكسندر سوكوروف
亚历山大·索科洛夫
Александр Сокуров
Russian Ark

“Alexander Sokurov’s desire to film The Russian Arch in one continuous take required extraordinary technical solutions. Since it is physically impossible to shoot more than twelve minutes of conventional film, we had to shoot on video. However, it was only the relatively recent arrival of 24p high definition compact cameras that offered the visual quality and the ability to make this film for theaters, including transferring the digital image to a 35mm negative.With the help of German specialists a complex portable platform was designed to meet the demands of the scenario which included precise architectural plans, highlighting the distance of 1300 meters covered by the course of the action. It was decided that the only way to move the camera would be to use a steadycam, although we could not be sure until after the final image that such a long steadycam shot would be possible, given the physical performance. extreme demanded from the German cinematographer, Tilman Büttner. After months of rehearsals, the 867 actors and extras, the three “live” orchestras all had to know their position and precise roles “. It’s just amazing.

cinema full

FREDERIK HEYMAN

Formalidade Cerimonial
O trabalho de Frederik Heyman é um ato de equilíbrio que incorpora várias mídias – incluindo vídeo, instalações e fotografia – muitas vezes em um ambiente digitalmente alterado. Em seu trabalho, Heyman explora a memória e a duração, usando fotogrametria e digitalização 3D para retratar e representar a passagem do tempo. As marcas registradas do trabalho de Heyman são mecânicas e tecnológicas: fios, rodas, letreiros LED de rolagem, armações de metal, pinças, lâmpadas industriais, telas e câmeras. Corpos – ao contrário dos humanos – estão sujeitos a uma dinâmica incomum com essas armadilhas tecnológicas. Em Cerimonial Formality (2020), uma contorcionista está presa em uma gaiola de metal enquanto um espectador, preso a fios, observa.

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Zeremonielle Formalität Frederik Heymans Arbeit ist ein Balanceakt, der mehrere Medien einbezieht – darunter Video, Installationen und Fotografie – oft in einer digital veränderten Umgebung. In seiner Arbeit erforscht Heyman Gedächtnis und Dauer, indem er Photogrammetrie und 3D-Digitalisierung verwendet, um den Lauf der Zeit darzustellen und darzustellen. Die Markenzeichen von Heymans Arbeit sind mechanisch und technologisch: Drähte, Räder, scrollende LED-Schilder, Metallrahmen, Pinzetten, Industrielampen, Bildschirme und Kameras. Körper unterliegen bei diesen technologischen Fallstricken – anders als der Mensch – einer ungewöhnlichen Dynamik. In Ceremonial Formality (2020) ist ein Schlangenmensch in einem Metallkäfig gefangen, während ein kabelgebundener Zuschauer zuschaut.

Frederik Heyman

CEREMONIAL FORMALITY
Frederik Heyman’s work is a balancing act incorporating multiple media – including video, installations and photogaphy – often in a digitally altered environment. In his work, Heyman explores memory and duration, using photogrammetry and 3D scanning to depict and represent the passage of time. The hallmarks of Heyman’s work are mechanical and technological: wires, wheels, scrolling LED marquees, metal frames, clamps, industrial lights, screens and cameras. Bodies–as opposed to humans–are subject to unusual dynamics with these technological trappings. In Ceremonial Formality (2020) a contortionist is encased in a metal cage while a spectator, hooked up to wires, looks on.

Gary Hill

Cutting Corners Creates More Sides
A spoken text …rummages through piles of surplus; boxed accouterments and that unaccounted for miscellanea… and the uneasiness of language itself as it grapples with the whereabouts of the necessary words. The narrative debris morphs through manifolds of optical glass with each utterance marking points along the way. On a long, black tableaux two cameras with little or no depth of field, sentence by sentence cut through a mysterious world of a seemingly inconsequential lineup of objects, tools, parts, bits and the unidentifiable forgotten –whatever might have been close at hand becomes enfolded in a richly colored crystalline doppelgänger image. For each sentence and “drilling” through the objects, the cameras’ parallaxes have been adjusted for a different cross section—the point where momentarily a continuous horizontal view is possible only to then quickly deconstruct as quickly as it formed. The object/installation itself is a self-contained self-reflexive mobile surface complete with positional projectors and screens and a narrow black “runway” of sorts reflecting the initial process of recording.

Aidan Meller

AI-DA
Ai-Da est le premier artiste ultra-réaliste au monde. Elle dessine en utilisant des caméras dans ses yeux, ses algorithmes d’IA et son bras robotique. Créée en février 2019, elle a eu sa première exposition solo à l’Université d’Oxford, « Unsecured Futures », où son art a encouragé les téléspectateurs à réfléchir à notre monde en évolution rapide. Depuis, elle a voyagé et exposé des œuvres à l’échelle internationale, et a eu sa première exposition dans un grand musée, le Design Museum, en 2021. Elle continue de créer de l’art qui remet en question nos notions de créativité dans une ère post-humaniste.

Liam Young

In the robot skies
In the Robot Skies is the world’s first narrative shot entirely through autonomous drones. In collaboration with the Embedded and Artificially intelligent Vision Lab in Belgium the film has evolved in the context of their experiments with specially developed camera drones each programmed with their own cinematic rules and behaviours. The film explores the drone as a cultural object, not just as a new instrument of visual story telling but also as the catalyst for a new collection of urban sub cultures. In the way the New York subway car of the 80’s gave birth to a youth culture of wild style graffiti and hip hop the age of ubiquitous drones as smart city infrastructure will create a new network of surveillance activists and drone hackers. From the eyes of the drones we see two teenagers each held by police order within the digital confines of their own council estate tower block in London. A network of drones survey the council estates, as a roving flock off cctv cameras and our two characters are kept apart by this autonomous aerial infrastructure.

Noriyuki Suzuki

*(asterisk)
“*(asterisk) is an installation comprised of an armillary sphere apparatus rotating an apple in 360 degrees and four cameras omnidirectionally scanning the surface of the apple in real-time. Computers calculate the similarity between fragmentary images of the present apple and apples I’ve eaten before, as if they were my memory of apples. The computations and compared apple-fragment images are shown on four displays respectively.” Noriyuki Suzuki

RANDOM INTERNATIONAL

随机国际
future self

‘future self’ is a study in human movement. the installation captures movement in light to create a three dimensional ‘living sculpture based on the composite gestures surrounding it, mirroring the actions of those who pass around it. entirely hand-made, 30,000 LED lights line the brass rods which are arranged to create a structure reminiscent of a rectangular prism, 3D cameras record people’s motions which are expressed through a ghostly, illuminated image, constantly changing.

BJOERN SCHUELKE

Observador do espaço
Esta enorme escultura está localizada no aeroporto Mineta San Jose da Califórnia, onde arte de alta tecnologia dá as boas-vindas aos passageiros. No topo da escada rolante do Terminal B, você encontrará a máquina absurda de Schuelke. Esta escultura gigante de três pernas explora a interatividade entre os humanos e a tecnologia moderna. Ele irá girar silenciosamente com a ajuda de dois braços acionados por hélice. E seu olho revela imagens obtidas de câmeras embutidas.

Daniel Rozin

Troll Mirror
The mechanical mirrors are made of various materials but share the same behavior and interaction; any person standing in front of one of these pieces is instantly reflected on its surface. The mechanical mirrors all have video cameras, motors and computers on board and produce a soothing sound as the viewer interacts with them. Troll Mirror was commisioned by Traget and is made of pairs of pink and blue troll dolls. Every troll doll pair can rotate so that the pink or blue troll face the front. The result is a colorfull reflection of the viewer’s outline and playfull colorfull transitions

Abel Gance

Napoleon

Kevin Brownlow’ restoration

Gance embarked on his greatest project, a six-part life of Napoléon. Only the first part was completed, tracing Bonaparte’s early life, through the Revolution, and up to the invasion of Italy, but even this occupied a vast canvas with meticulously recreated historical scenes and scores of characters. The film was full of experimental techniques, combining rapid cutting, hand-held cameras, superimposition of images, and, in wide-screen sequences, shot using a system he called Polyvision needing triple cameras (and projectors), achieved a spectacular panoramic effect, including a finale in which the outer two film panels were tinted blue and red, creating a widescreen image of a French flag. The original version of the film ran for around 6 hours. A shortened version received a triumphant première at the Paris Opéra in April 1927 before a distinguished audience that included the future General de Gaulle. The length was reduced still further for French and European distribution, and it became even shorter when it was shown in America. Napoleon is a silent film directed by Abel Gance, dramatising the youth and early career of Napoleon Bonaparte. Its most complete screening, said to be nine hours long, took place in Paris in 1927 – but this version was subsequently lost. British film-maker Kevin Brownlow saw a version as a schoolboy and subsequently restored the film to close to its original length from various prints. His restoration was first shown in London in 1980 with a score by Carl Davis.

Marshmallow Laser Feast

In the Eyes of the Animal
In the Eyes of the Animal, a journey through the food chain, is an artistic interpretation of the sensory perspectives of three British species. Created using Lidar scans, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) or drones & bespoke 360° cameras, the piece is set to a binaural soundscape using audio recordings sourced from Grizedale Forest in the north of England.

Rafael Lozano Hemmer

Redundant Assembly
In “Redundant Assembly” an arrangement of several cameras composes a live-portrait of the visitor from six perspectives simultaneously, aligned using face detection. The resulting image is uncanny, detached from the laws of symmetry and the depth perception of binocular vision. If several visitors are standing in front of the work, a composite portrait of their different facial features develops in real time, creating a mongrel “selfie”.

Klaus Obermaier

克劳斯奥伯迈尔
the concept of … (here and now)

In front of a giant screen, two dancers interact with a cohort of cameras… Their movements are captured by infra-red sensors and projected onto the screen, whereby their bodies become the canvas on which new images take shape. The result is a shifting kaleidoscope of strange, living, quasi-mathematical visual worlds which sometimes seem to be emanating or even escaping from the dancers’ bodies. “Who decides which movement to make: the man or the machine?” Blurring the line between the real and the virtual, Klaus Obermaier loves to subsume his performers’ bodies and physicality in a disconcerting digital universe. With his latest creation, the choreographer/artist has taken a bold new step. He has constructed a system of projectors and infra-red sensor-cameras, trained upon the movements of two dancers. The performers thus find themselves thrown headlong into a living, moving graphical universe: their movements are projected onto the screen, but at the same time their bodies are illuminated by more projected images. This is a true artistic performance, pushing well beyond the frontiers of a standard dance recital, or even a contemporary dance show. A corporeal, temporal performance. A choreography which makes subtle use of its raw materials, deftly combining lights, video, perspectives and the real-time power of bodily movement.

Lauren Lee McCarthy

SOMEONE
SOMEONE imagines a human version of Amazon Alexa, a smart home intelligence for people in their own homes. For a two month period in 2019, four participants’ homes around the United States were installed with custom-designed smart devices, including cameras, microphones, lights, and other appliances. 205 Hudson Gallery in NYC housed a command center where visitors could peek into the four homes via laptops, watch over them, and remotely control their networked devices. Visitors would hear smart home occupants call out for “Someone”—prompting the visitors to step in as their home automation assistant and respond to their needs. This video installation presents documentation from the initial performance on four screens throughout the space.

KANNO So / yang02

Avatars
For this installation, So Kanno + yang02 composed all kinds of differently sized objects, including a telephone, a traffic cone, a plaster figure, a car, and a plant. Cameras, microphones, monitors and microcomputers are embedded in everyday objects arranged in the exhibition space, and connected to the Internet. Visitors can experience the work by logging in to / riding each object via a web browser. Those objects exist as substitutes of – yet together with – real human beings (the visitors) in the same real environment that is subject to physical laws, rather than operating in a virtual space. Against the backdrop of the age of IoT, where all kinds of things are connected through networks, and artificial intelligence is about to mature, this work observes the new relationships that emerge when inorganic, non-autonomous objects transform into persons that act and perceive the world according to their own intentions.

Michiko Tsuda

YOU WOULD COME BACK THERE TO SEE ME AGAIN THE FOLLOWING DAY
This installation utilizes mirrors and video cameras combined with various types of frame, a motif often discussed in the context of the history of painting and film. The title is a typical English sentence in free indirect speech (by what is normally a third-person subject). With the object of “there” and “following day” varying with the context, this title reflects the experience of viewers, whose relationship to their image and to the space raises questions about the meaning of “here” and “now.”

jip van leeuwenstein

surveillance exclusion
Camera’s and other technologies create a safer living environment than ever before. Mega databanks and high resolution cameras stock hundreds of exabytes a year. But who has access to this data? Not only the security department but also the advertisement industry is interested in this technology. They pay to use real time data to their advantage. They create advertisements that call your name, keep records of your personal interests and they follow you everywhere you go. By wearing this mask formed like a lens it possible to become unrecognizable for facial recognition software and because of it’s transparence you will not lose your identity and facial expressions. So it’s still possible to interact with the people around you.

THORSTEN FLEISCH

Energie!
Thorsten Fleisch creates films that reveal the shapes and patterns of natural forces and phenomena. In this work he reveals what energy in one of its simplest forms looks like in motion. Energie! is a sequence of still images created on light-sensitive photographic paper. The artist exposed dozens of sheets of paper to enormous electrical discharges, each leaving its imprint as a trail of light. Animating these images reveals patterns in their flow of energy, akin to tracing the flow of electricity at each moment of a lightning strike. As the images are photographs created without cameras, they are records of single moments. Accordingly we see dozens of split-second documents animated to reveal the shape and power of energy.

ROWAN CORKILL

Rowan Corkill is a 22 year old artist living in Fife, just outside St. Andrews. A recent graduate of Gray’s School of Art (BA Hons in Photography and Electronic Media), he prefers not to be asked anything about cameras as “I wouldn’t have a clue”!

Ever since seeing the work of Marcel Duchamp Joseph Cornell and Richard Rosenberg he was immediately fascinated by the use of everyday objects. This became a reoccuring aspect in his own work and whilst in second year at Gray’s a vernacular photography project opened up the idea of using found pictres – artists Richard Prince and Christian Boltanski becoming huge influences.

Charles Atlas Rashaun Mitchell and Silas Riener

Tesseract
Tesseract is a collaboration between Charles Atlas, Rashaun Mitchell, and Silas Riener. It is an evening-length presentation in 2 parts separated by an intermission: a 3D dance film featuring 7 dancers and a live proscenium performance with 6 dancers. The film offers speculative worlds and alternate possibilities in bold visual environments. The performance includes live-video capture with multiple cameras, mixed by Atlas and projected into the stage space. Images obscure and reveal moving bodies behind a translucent scrim, magnified and refracted by Atlas. Through collective action we forge a link between human ritual conjuring and new technological magic. Between the past and the future.

Martina Menegon

when you are close to me i shiver
sound design: Alexander Martinz
“when you are close to me I shiver” is an algorithmically controlled live simulation, a real-time generated virtual reality that takes place in a version of the future in which humans, out of desperation, gather in masses on the last remaining piece of land. Inspired by the walrus scene in the documentary “Our Planet” narrated by David Attenborough and produced by Silverback Films, the project proposes an intense scenario encompassing our environmental and personal crises. It reflects on how we identify and connect ourselves in different realities while addressing the human condition in a world in ecological and therefore social crisis. On the tablets, virtual cameras scan the environment from various point of views, like surveillance drones. On the main screen, a similar camera randomly targets and focuses on different situations while a familiar voice-over narrates the tragic story.

FABIANO ONÇA & COLMEIA

Tantalus Quest
file festival

Game designer Fabiano Onça conceived the game, in which people must fill geometric shapes with their own silhouettes (as captured by webcams hanging from the ceiling): Software was built with OpenFrameworks, which is to C++ what Processing is to Java. A prototype was built with Flash (AS3), but it was slow — reading pixel values (BitmapData.getPixel) can be processor-heavy. Thanks to OpenFrameworks, porting the AS3 code to C++ was quite easy. The application is very simple: the images captured by the cameras are brightened, blurred and thresholded, resulting in black blobs. The amount of blob pixels inside the geometric shape count as positive points and the pixels outside the geometric shape count as negative points.

Mari Velonaki

Diamandini
Diamandini is a 155cm tall custom-made humanoid robot incorporating an omni-directional wheeled motion platform; cameras, laser scanners and computers for real-time tracking and installation control. The humanoid robot is being developed through a five year research project between Mari Velonaki and robotics scientists at the Centre for Social Robotics, Australian Centre for Field Robotics, the University of Sydney.

anaisa franco

On Shame
FILE BELO HORIZONTE 2018-DISRUPTIVA
foto: Luiza Ananias

On Shame is part of the series Psychosomatics which was initiated in 2010. In these works Franco makes it possible to tangibly experience such emotions as joy, fear, confusion, happiness or shame by means of digital technologies. Cameras and motion and tactile sensors serve as tools to facilitate the dialogue between humans and machines. more

T-HR3 Humanoid Robot

Toyota Motor Corporation
Toyota has revealed its third generation humanoid robot, the T-HR3, which can be controlled and synchronized with the operator’s movements. The user wears data gloves and an HTC Vive VR headset that’s linked to cameras to show the robot’s perspective. T-HR3 stands 1.54 meters tall and weighs 75kg ( 5 feet, 1 inches / 165 pounds) and was developed to explore the possibility of assisting humans in the home, medical facilities, construction sites, disaster areas, and even in space.more

SEIKO MIKAMI

Desire of Codes

This interactive installation consisting of three parts is set up in YCAM’s Studio A, a space that is normally used for theatre performances.
A large number of devices resembling tentacles with built-in small cameras are placed across a huge wall (Part 1), while six robotic “search arms” equipped with cameras and projectors are suspended from the ceiling (Part 2). Each device senses with insect-like wriggling movements the positions and movements of visitors, and turns toward detected persons in order to observe their actions. In addition, a giant round-shaped screen that looks like an insect’s compound eye is installed in the back of the exhibition space (Part 3). Visual data transmitted from each camera, along with footage recorded by surveillance cameras installed at various places around the world, are stored in a central database, and ultimately projected in complex images mixing elements of past and present, the venue itself and points around the globe, onto the screen. The compound eye visualizes a new reality in which fragmentary aspects of space and time are recombined, while the visitor’s position as a subject of expression and surveillance at once indicates the new appearances of human corporeality and desire.

KRZYSZTOF WODICZKO

Dis-Armor Project

Dis-Armor is the newest in a series of psychocultural prosthetic equipment designed to meet the communicative need of the alienated, traumatized, and silenced residents of today’s cities. It connects contemporary research in two fields: wearable communi- cation technology and prosthetics. In doing so, it counters the dichotomy of the present explosion in communication technology and rampant cultural miscommunication. Dis-Armor offers an opportunity for indirect, mediated communication by allowing its users to speak through their backs. LCD screens, worn on the back, display live images of the wearer’s eyes transmitted from cameras installed in the helmet covering the face. A speaker positioned below the LCD screens amplifies the user’s voice. Attached to the helmet is a rearview mirror, alternatively, a rearview video camera, monitor, microphone, and headphone. These permit the user to see the face and hear the words of the spectator/interlocutor standing behind. Wireless video equipment installed in the helmet further allows two users to work in tandem, showing each other the other’s eyes and broadcasting to each the other’s voice.

SPY

Cameras