TROIKA

ダークマター
「トロイカの形而上学的に奇妙なぶら下がっている彫刻ダークマター(2014)、立っている場所に応じて円、正方形、または六角形のように見える大きな黒いオブジェクトは、(オールドウォルバーのビデオのように)主観的な視点と客観的な真実。
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Dark Matter, a large black object that looks like a circle, a square or a hexagon depending on where you’re standing, probes (like Olde Wolber’s video) a very contemporary disturbance about the irreconcilability of subjective point-of-view and objective truth.

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Un grand objet noir qui ressemble à un cercle, un carré ou un hexagone selon l’endroit où vous vous trouvez, sonde (comme la vidéo d’Olde Wolber) une perturbation très contemporaine sur l’inconcilabilité du point de vue subjectif et de la vérité objective.

PETER WILLIAM HOLDEN

Vicious Circle

file festival

Come molti della mia generazione, sono cresciuto succhiando un tubo a raggi catodici e facendo il bagno nelle onde radio. Tutto questo è rappresentato all’interno del mio lavoro, in un collage di movimento, luce e suono. Attualmente con il mio lavoro sto esplorando modi per dissolvere i confini tra cinematografia e scultura. Le mie recenti ricerche su questo tema hanno coinvolto l’uso di computer combinato con elementi meccanici per creare installazioni simili a mandala. Queste installazioni sono il mio mezzo e le uso per creare animazioni effimere. Questa effimera coreografia di movimento è il punto focale del mio lavoro. Credo che questo fascino per le immagini in movimento e la trasformazione degli oggetti derivi dalla mia giovinezza, dove i primi computer domestici degli anni ’80 mi hanno dato uno sguardo nel meraviglioso mondo della matematica applicata. Su questi computer è stato possibile con codici semplici generare fantastici schemi e suoni astratti e quell’incontro ha distrutto per sempre il confine nella mia mente tra astratto e reale. Anche la danza gioca un ruolo significativo nel mio lavoro; Sono stato attratto dalla musica elettronica. L’electro con il suo suono sintetizzato mi ha introdotto alla break-dance e la mia anima è stata catturata dalla bellezza del movimento fisico coreografato.

Henk Stallinga

Fanscreen
Fanscreen is comprised of several panels made up of computer fans which are linked together to form a larger ‘screen’. These screens are arranged side-by-side in a large circle that the viewer can enter. Each fan is programmed independently, creating an effect that mimics individual “pixels” on a larger screen. Moving in synchronicity, the programmed fans produce a kind of “film” of various abstract movements.

Jelle Mastenbroek

Splendour Lender
In Dutch history people expressed their status by displaying their most beautiful pieces of porcelain in the so called ‘pronkkasten’. This splendour lender is inspired by the ‘pronkkast’ and reflects upon status in modern times. How important is status in times of declining moral standards? In times where financial markets collapse, economies are shrinking and money tend to become a goal in itself? With this project I want to express the real nature of money and tell the true story of status; happiness. The splendour lender brings porcelain to life and shows the original function of  money as a medium to exchange goods and services. By putting a euro coin you’ll experience a joyful moment. After usage the coin will be returned so the circle can go round.

COOP HIMMELB(L)AU

CHBL Jammer Coat
The CHBL Jammer Coat is a piece of clothing that enables its user to disappear: Google cannot find you anymore. The piece is made of metallized fabrics, which are blocking radio waves and shielding the wearer against tracking devices. You are no longer reachable on your mobile phone and no information from your credit card can be captured. The Wave Circle pattern of the fabric gives an illusion of strange multiple body parts, which hides and frees the individual physicality.

Bahar Yürükoğlu

Flow Through

“Flow Through takes as its departure point Bahar Yürükoğlu’s experiences during her travels to the Arctic Circle in 2015, both in the summertime, when the sun doesn’t set, and during the winter months, when darkness prevails. In the exhibition, the artist creates fictional spaces based on the dualities she observed in the Arctic region; blurring the boundaries between presence and absence, past and future, nature and civilisation, as well as cyclical movements and inevitable transformations, these installations, photographs and videos test the viewer’s perceptive capacities, and demand that the dichotomy between the subject and the object is set aside”. Duygu Demir

Raster-Noton

White Circle
»White Circle« consists of fluorescent tubes that respond to musical impulses and illuminate the room. Five dedicated compositions by alva noto, byetone, frank bretschneider, and kangding ray playing in a continuous loop (one set takes ca. 45 minutes) model the interrelation between sound, light, and architecture in different ways. Each piece represents an independent and self-contained conceptual proposal by the respective composer. All tracks are multichannel compositions based on the idea of creating a vivid immediate experience of auditory space and visual stimuli. With acoustic material routed to twentyseven speakers placed throughout the gallery, sound itself takes on a threedimensional and indeed sculptural quality.

Masaki Fujihata

Voices of Aliveness
This project, upon the initiative of l’Ecole des Beaux-Arts de Nantes, has been conceived as a meta-monument where are gathered video sequences recorded by a camera with GPS. People are screaming while biking in a 500 m circle in the countryside. The traces of this route can be visualized thanks to lines that form a sort of tower in the virtual space, where it can go on indefinitely. On these lines, in an order that looks more like a music score than a succession of shootings, mobile video screens simultaneously display the image of the performances.

Sarah Sze

Shorter than the Day
The New York-based artist captures the sky as it changes from cerulean blue morning to a colorful sunset to the many shades of night through nearly 1,000 photographs of the sky. Each printed image is fastened to the aluminum and steel with alligator clips and is revealed as viewers move around the massive work, just like the earth circles the sun to mark a day.

KEITH ARMSTRONG

Shifting Intimacies
An interactive/media artwork for one person at a time. Each participant enters a large, dark space containing two circles of projected film imagery presented within an immersive sound environment. One image floats upon a disc of white sand and the other on a circle of white dust. Participants’ movements direct and affect the filmic image and spatialised audio experience. Throughout the work a layer of dust (an artificial life form) slowly eats away and infuses itself deep into the imagery and sound. Each person has 10 minutes alone with the work. Their movement through the space continually affects speed, quality, balance and flow within the work. At the end of the experience they are invited to climb a lit platform and cast dust back onto the images below.

Kimchi and chips

Halo
99 robotic mirrors continuously move throughout the day to follow the sun like sunflowers. These mirrors, arrayed across two 5 meter tall towers and one 15 meter long track, each emit a beam of sunlight into a cloud of water mist. The beams are computationally aligned so that together they draw a bright circle in the air. Dependent entirely on the presence of the sun for its completion, the work explores the possibilities and limitations of technology to capture what is out of reach, to harness nature and bring the sun down to earth. Collaborating with the natural fluctuations in the climate, Halo appears only for moments when the wind, sun, water, and technology coincide, creating a form which exists between the material and immaterial.

Ouchhh

H OM E OMOR PH ISM

Dome A/V Performance

A homeomorphism, also called a continuous transformation, is an equivalence relation and
one-to-one correspondence between points in two geometric figures or topological spaces
that is continuous in both directions.Many forms observed in nature can be related to geometry. In accordance with classical geometry,the shapes that found in nature are consisting of lines and planes, circles and spheres,
triangles and cones. These shapes actually are a powerful abstraction of reality, so we need primitive objects to give a form and understand the complex structure that exists in nature.

 

KUNIHIKO MORINAGA

森永邦彦
쿠니히코 모리나가
くにひこ もりなが
КУНИХИКО МОРИНАГА
Anrealage

Kunihiko Morinaga, the creative director of cult Japanese label Anrealage, has a thing for sensations and optical illusions. His debut Paris show last season was about light and shadow. Today, his sophomore outing focused on light and dark. Or, better, on the impressions you get from flashing or projecting light in pitch black. The Anrealage sculptural silhouettes were cut in a special black fabric that revealed a printed texture only under ultraviolet lights, or had needle-punched white circles—like a spotlight projection—splattered across the front. To emphasize the depth of such darkness, everything was black, including models’ faces, a heavy stroke that made things a little too dramatic.

Sanja Marusic

Moonflight
The fashion short was inspired by the symbolic abstract forms and geometric shapes of the avant- gardist Triadic ballet. Sanja Marusic simplied bodily shapes by substituting them with cylinders and circles, she made her own costumes and then abstracted the human form even further by incorporating stylised dance movements by filming herself dancing. The result is a surrealist symbiosis of the human body moving through time and space.

Random International

Fragments

Almost two hundred identical, small mirrors are arranged in a grid to form a flat, homogenous surface. Hung against the wall, the mirrors are closely spaced and apparently static; but they possess the ability to move in harmony with one another. Approaching the artwork, the individual mirrors turn together to face the onlooker, following as he or she moves. The plane of the surface distorts into varying, three-dimensional forms — perhaps a wave, or a curve, or a circle. The reflection becomes fragmented and the apparently inanimate object becomes akin to something organic and alive

TONY ORRICO

Penwald: 2: 8 circles: 8 gestures
Se trata de creación a través del cuerpo, el movimiento y la acción. Podríamos decir que lo que muestra es más una acción que una exposición. Así, presentará una performance de creación plástica en directo, que deja sobre el papel un dibujo espectacular. Las dos obras de su actuación se enmarcan dentro del proyecto artístico en el que está trabajando, Penwald drawings. Su técnica: grafito en mano y utilizar las posibilidades de movimiento de su cuerpo, ya sea tumbado, con las rodillas o involucrando todo el cuerpo en su obra.

XANDRA VAN DER EIJK

Momentum
Momentum shows the rhythm and registers the passage of time. The installation, accompanied by the actions of the artist, describe the bittersweet feelings of transience. In a four meter long iron construction pigments drip slowly, drawing circles on a water surface.

Pedro Veneroso

file festival 2019
‘Tempo: cor’(Time:color) consists of an immersive installation that seeks to modify our experience of time by converting hours into color. A set of chromatic clocks, each set to a different GMT time zone, projects, in a semicircle, the current time in their mathematical and chromatic representations. The conversion between these two forms of time representation is based on an algorithm composed of sinusoidal functions that modulates the RGB colors as a function of the current time, gradually modifying the intensities of blue, green and red throughout the day: at midday yellow predominates, while at four in the afternoon the hour is red; midnight is blue, six o’clock in the morning is green. Side by side, the colors projected by the clocks merge, creating an immersive experience of a continuous and circular time, between the different time zones, that crosses the entire chromatic spectrum. This installation is part of a series of works in which I investigate the relationships between human notations and codes and our experience of space-time, seeking to change the ways we understand it; in this case, visitors immerse themselves in a spatial experience of time that provokes the questioning of notations and perceptions that we usually consider axiomatic. Changing the way we represent time will change our way of experiencing it?

JULIUS VON BISMARCK

versuch unter kreisen

This is the artistic result of a residency spent at CERN, where particles circulate on rings at great speed. The four lamps that are suspended from the ceiling also describe circles, but at varying speeds. Starting from there, every imaginable choreography is possible as well as every interpretation. The lamps describe figures that imperceptible transitions trigger one to the other. According to the artist, it’s only a question of mathematics here, though one asks oneself which one of the four incandescent lamps directs the others. And just as quick as they come into alignment as though linked by invisible ties, there is one that seems to accelerate while another can’t manage to keep up with the group. You can watch them for hours on end, hypnotised by the aesthetic beauty of physical laws. The artist, Julius von Bismarck, when receiving his prize admitted to having learned a lot at the CERN. It is likely that the scientists were also marked by his presence.
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Troika

Dark Matter

‘Troika’s metaphysically strange hanging sculpture Dark Matter (2014), a large black object that looks like a circle, a square or a hexagon depending on where you’re standing, probes (like Olde Wolber’s video) a very contemporary disturbance about the irreconcilability of subjective point-of-view and objective truth.’

Yihan LI

Since the emergence of time as a concept, the circle has been a graphic representation that registers and measures the passing of seconds, minutes, hours, and even decades. . . . The torus may be seen as a three-dimensional form utilized to represent time as it travels through a cyclic loop. The geometric shape of the torus speaks of duration, of looped time, and of transformations along and in time. In this project, Boolean operations between varying tori in multiple dimensions indicate the interaction between durations—possibly time in addition to time, or interactions diluted by time—that reveal a new architectural realm featuring free curves which direct visitors’ movements inside flowing spaces. People will lose the perception of direction or time and find themselves worshipping in open and serene volumes.

Haegue Yang

Boxing Ballet
Yang’s Boxing Ballet turns one half of the gallery into a reworking of Oskar Schlemmer’s 1922 costumed dance work Triadisches Ballett, with replicas of five of the Bauhaus teacher’s bulbous and exaggerated figures, from a female figure made of hoops to a circle that looks like a flattened stickman. Here, Schlemmer’s figures are reimagined as golden bell-covered shapes on wheels or wire frames hanging by a wire from the ceiling. As they all come with handlebars, it seems we are meant to provide the choreography, stiffly pushing, say, a giant roosterlike creature around like an awkward shopping trolley.

NOPER & SAINT MACHINE

FEED ME
FEED ME is a ludic experiment that explores the relation between the artwork and its public. With a self-ironical approach, the project is calling the subjects of monstrous and perpetually insatiable Tra to her feeding ritual: the entire exhibition is a live organism that feeds on the energy produced by the movements of the public. It is an interactive multimedia capsule that carries a dynamic platform where everything moves, pulses and reacts to motion on a common rhythm. The exhibition space is structured in narrowing concentric circles, creating several worlds that include each other and cocoon around a magical protection space, thus the public is activated on several levels.

rogan brown

Magic Circle Colour Variation

Dutch Invertuals

The Circle

Paul Cocksedge

Freeze Multi Circle Table
In Freeze, Cocksedge exploits freezing temperatures to create a seamless bond between metals that otherwise do not adhere in nature. The breakthrough in the series – a table of copper and aluminum – was made by first burying four copper legs in snow, leaving them to contract by 100th of a millimeter; second, excavating the legs and inserting them into holes cut into an aluminum slab where they were allowed to un-freeze back to ambient temperature thereby firmly locking into place in a strong, invisible join.

Mariko Mori

Oneness
Oneness features two bodies of work, both related to the Wave UFO project. Oneness is a sculpture of six “alien” figures, linking hands in a circle. The aliens connote otherness, but are irresistibly attractive, encouraging the viewer to kneel down and hug them. When the viewer participates in the work by hugging the figures and welcoming them, the aliens’ eyes light up and their hearts start beating. When all six are hugged at once the base lights up as well. The figures are made with Technogel, a high tech flexible material molded onto a metal armature.

ANDREW HIERONYMI

move
File Festival
MOVE is an interactive installation divided into six distinct modules, JUMP, AVOID, CHASE, THROW, HIDE and COLLECT. Each module offers a single-user interaction, based on a verb corresponding to the action the participant is invited to perform. Each verb corresponds to a common procedure acted out by avatars during videogame play. Each module offers an interaction with abstracted shapes (circles, rectangles) behaving according to simplified rules of physics (collision, friction). Each module is color-coded with consistency, where the color red is used for the graphical element that poses the core challenge. Each module increases difficulty in a similar linear manner.What makes MOVE unusual is that unlike most computer vision or sensor based games like Eye-toy or Dance Dance Revolution, the participant IS the avatar, he is not seeing a representation of herself or an indirect result of her actions on a separate screen but instead interacts directly with the projected graphical constituents of the game. Because those graphical elements are non-representational they do not allow for a projection in a fictional space. The combination of abstracted shapes and direct interaction reinforces in the player the focus on the action itself (JUMP, AVOID, CHASE, THROW, HIDE or COLLECT) instead of an ulterior goal.

Aranda\Lasch

阿兰达\拉希
アランダ\ラッシュ
Railing Lounge Chair

Railing is an exploration of structural modular loops that are upholstered like handle-grips to become furniture. Each piece of furniture is a single loop made up of many circles. Here, the circle does not display the qualities it is most known for, but it is what a circle can be. It is not whole or complete but is instead growing into itself. It is a circle that refuses its own dimension and finitude, that struggles to be endless.

Yihan LI

Architectural Timepiece
Since the emergence of time as a concept, the circle has been a graphic representation that registers and measures the passing of seconds, minutes, hours, and even decades. . . . The torus may be seen as a three-dimensional form utilized to represent time as it travels through a cyclic loop. The geometric shape of the torus speaks of duration, of looped time, and of transformations along and in time. In this project, Boolean operations between varying tori in multiple dimensions indicate the interaction between durations—possibly time in addition to time, or interactions diluted by time—that reveal a new architectural realm featuring free curves which direct visitors’ movements inside flowing spaces. People will lose the perception of direction or time and find themselves worshipping in open and serene volumes.

Signe Pierce

A Reality Artist Taking Inspiration From The Everyday

Signe Pierce gained notoriety in 2015 within queer and feminist art circles for her incredibly shocking and poignant performance video, American Reflexxx[…] Currently, Signe is elaborating on the themes she began to explore in that video, such as cyber surveillance, constructs of femininity, and the male gaze.

DEWAIN VALENTINE

CIRCLE BLUE
Influenced by the seascapes and skies of Southern California, Valentine was an early pioneer of using industrial plastics and resin to produce monumental sculptures that reflect and distort the light and space that surround them. For Valentine, a smooth surface was the whole point of the work and he did not want it to look old. While he was teaching a course in plastics technology at UCLA in 1965, he wanted to produce a polyester resin in large volumes that would not crack from curing.

Emiko Kasahara

La Charme
For Emiko Kasahara, female hair symbolises the ultimate love-hate relationship. To prove that point, the Japanese-born artist has picked eight Australian women, turned most into blondes and filmed them posing on five large circles of synthetic hair. “Hair is a symbol of beauty on the human body,” Kasahara said. “Hair represents vitality of life and sexualities and is precious. “But when you cut off the edge and let it fall on the floor, it’s considered disgusting dirt. It’s the same hair but it’s interesting that it shows both beauty and dirt.”

Vincent Ganivet

Fontaine I
Vincent Ganivet (b. 1976, lives and works in Ile-Saint-Denis) maps out a territory halfway between accident and equilibrium, work of art and found object. Going back to elementary forms (the circle) or architectural principles (the keystone), he renders their orthodoxy fragile by putting them into a state of instability.

henk stallinga

Chain Reaction
This monumental light sculpture from Henk Stallinga is a composition of 144 circle lights. The intensity of the individual lights gradually varies from a subtle glow to an intense bright light. During the course of one natural day, this circle of light ‘moves’ up the chain, providing the visitor with a sense of time.

Joseph DeLappe

circle drawing surveillance system
A train locomotive travels continuously in a circle harnessed with electro-mechanical appendages, including a drawing arm holding black compressed charcoal to paper. The train rides on the first rail, while the two inner rails function, respectively, to power the mini-video camera mounted on the train while the other sends the real-time video signal from the camera to the projector[…]

FREUDENTHAL AND VERHAGEN

Circles
Dutch collaborators Carmen Freudenthal (photographer) and Elle Verhagen (stylist) have been working together since 1989. Their collaboration with fashion designers, performers and other artists results in a wide variety of work, which is always recognizable for its humorous approach of daily life and its use (and abuse) of contemporary imagery and (photo)graphic techniques.

olafur eliasson

オラファー·エリアソン
اولافور الياسون
奥拉维尔·埃利亚松
אולאפור אליאסון
ОЛАФУР ЭЛИАССОН
cirkelbroen bridge
The bridge is made of five circular platforms, and it contributes to a larger circle that will form a pedestrian route around Copenhagen Harbour, where people – cycling, running, walking – can see the city from a very different perspective. As many as 5,000 people will cross this bridge each day. I hope that these people will use Cirkelbroen as a meeting place, and that the zigzag design of the bridge will make them reduce their speed and take a break. To hesitate on our way is to engage in bodily thought. I see such introspection as an essential part of a vibrant city

CHUN HUA CATHERINE DONG

The Inner Circle
Visual Poetics of Embodied Shame

GIUSEPPE RANDAZZO

Джузеппе Рандаццо
stone fields (Using computer algorithms)

This project has started from a search for a 3d-objects optimal packing algorithm over a surface, but evolved in something rather different. I love the work by Richard Long, from which this project takes its cue. The way he fills lonely landscapes with arcaic stones patterns and its eroic artistic practice, in his monumental vision, is in strong contrast with this computational approach that – ironically – allows virtual stones creation and sorting in a non physical, mental way, a ‘lazy’ version, so to speak. The virtual stones created from several fractal subdivision strategies, find their proper position within the circle, with a trial and error hierarchical algorithm. A mix of attractors and scalar fields (some with Perlin noise) drives the density and size of the stones. The code is a C++ console application that outputs a OBJ 3d file.

JAMES NIZAM

Джеймсе Низаме
詹姆斯·尼扎姆
제임스 니잠
four circles

maihudson

into the continuum circles moving in circles
gif

Carsten Höller

卡斯滕·奥莱
КАРСТЕН ХЕЛЛЕР
Neon Circle

Molly Haslund

CIRCLES
CIRCLES was shown in the yard of the museum at the opening and in Roskilde city in urban space like parks, parking lots, squares etc. Up to three compasses in different sizes were available for passers by and other interested during the performances.Molly Haslund ventures out into the city wearing grey: a grey suit, grey socks and grey shoes so that she blends in with the tarmac and the pavement. She carries a huge pair of compasses much taller than herself. She stops somewhere and starts drawing a white circle on the ground. She completes the first circle and then moves the pair of compasses and starts drawing a new circle that overlaps the first one. She draws a third circle and stands in her grey shoes in the middle of the circle for a moment before snapping the pair of compasses together and moving on.

doris chase

Circles II
Doris Chase has achieved international stature as a pioneer in the field of video art since she moved from Seattle to New York City in 1972. An artist of remarkable and continuous creativity, Chase now divides her time between her video headquarters in New York and a Seattle studio where she works on new projects in painting and sculpture.Beginning as an innovative painter and sculptor in Seattle in the 1950s, Chase created sculpture that was meant to be touched and manipulated by the viewer. Chase then developed large-scale kinetic sculptures in collaboration with choreographers, and her art was set in motion by dancers. In New York, her majors contribution to the evolution of artists’ video has been her work in videodance. On videotape, dancers and sculpture evolve into luminous abstract forms which represent some of the most sophisticated employments of video technology by an artist of the 1970s. In the 1980s, Chase began working in the nascent genre of video theater. In these productions, she uses the imtimacy of the video screen to achieve a new synthesis of visual and dramatic art. Her video theatre compositions present multicultural and social commentary, utilizing scripts by writers such as Lee Breuer, Thulani Davis, and Jessica Hagedorn in the “Concepts” series. Collaborating with actresses Geralding Page, Ann Jackson, Roberta Wallach, Joan Plowright, and Luise Riner in the “By Herself” series, she focuses on the viewpoints and experiences of older women. Today, coming full circle, Doris Chase in Seattle is exploring a renewed interest in painting and sculpture as well as in the modernist aesthetic she never really ceased pursuing, even during her most adventuresome multimedia years.

Ebtisam Abdulaziz

Women’s Circles

POUL GERNES

Drømmeskib / Dream Ship
n the early 1960s, Poul Gernes started to concentrate on simple, reduced forms making strong visual effects like circles, stripes or dots in his painting, similar to pop motivs. Most of the approx. 40 Targets painted then were designs for architecture-related works. At first he drew the rings for his Targets in pencil, but later he went over to scratching them into the ground with a pair of compasses. This gave the paintings a relief-like character and created clearly defined color fields. The contrasting color intensities in the circles make each color seem like a distinct, three-dimensional volume. The vivid color combinations of the Targets (shown at the Venice Biennale in 1988) come from sketches or ready-mades like the stripes on a t-shirt. Sometimes Gernes used random systems as well, for example by putting paint pots behind him and dipping the paintbrush into one pot blind. Although it may not seem to be the case, Gernes’ work makes no passing references to contemporary works by other artists.

Maya Lin

Arctic Circle

JESSE HOULDING

Circle Drawing Machine (on canvas)

RUTH PROCTOR

circles

SUZAN DRUMMEN

kaleidoscopic crystal floor
dutch artist suzan drummen’s large-scale floor installations are mesmerizing and complex circular patterns made out of mirrors and brightly colored glass. the fractal-like arrangements feature ornate and elaborate circles growing exponentially out of each other and vibrant rings of spiraling colors winding into the surface of the floor. they are composed of crystals, chromed metal, precious stones, mirrors and optical glass. a sensory experience, and visually stimulating, the glittering installations play with the architecture of the space — climbing up walls and sweeping across the surfaces — examining the idea of illusion and optical effects.

LOUIE RIGANO

CLOCK

About-Time is a clock that challenges our power of perception and intuition. Featuring a constantly changing composition, through both color and form, it invites us to view the idea of time from a fresh perspective. Three translucent circles, which possess a logical visual hierarchy (the largest circle tells the hour, the smallest tells the second), pivot atop a larger white circle. The locations of the circles’ outer most points refer to the time. Traditional clocks, utilizing written numbers, rely on reading the information. This clock relies solely on visual information in the form of varying colors and shapes. Time is manifested into a new and purely visual language

KEN UNSWORTH

Suspended stone circle II

KRISTINE HYMOLLER

In Circle

DORIS POWER

Circle Of Life

BRUCE NAUMAN

Hand Circle

ENOTA ARHITEKTI

sculptural traffic circle

JULIE BIRON

Do Not Disturb My Circles

PETER COFFIN

פיטר קופין
ピーター·コフィン
spiral staircase

Coffin’s Untitled (Spiral Staircase) takes the idea of a simple architectural fitting to an absurd extreme. Reminiscent of Escher’s Infinite Staircase, Coffin’s winding steps are moulded into a circle, inexhaustibly twisting in impossible logic made real. By remodeling the steps, Coffin strips the staircase of its function, turning a thing which is normally engaged with physicality into a dizzying conceptual game. Through his humorous constructions, Coffin bridges art history and everyday experience, subverting the preconceptions of both.

KEN UNSWORTH

Suspended stone circle