Jonas Pequeno

Foley
Huxley-Parlour gallery presents a solo exhibition of new audiovisual and installation works by the London-based artist Jonas Pequeno. Comprising of three works, a kinetic sound installation Foley, a CGI video Ocean Scene Composite and a photographing print, and the act of appearing, the exhibition considers incongruity in digital fictional constructs. The title of the exhibition, /ˈfəʊli/, is a phonetic transcription of the word foley, a film-making technique used to manually mimic everyday sound effects in post-production when props do not acoustically match their real life counterparts. Influenced by the concept of foley, Pequeno’s work features an audiovisual installation that incorporates microphones and balloons swayed by a fan, replicating the sound of crashing ocean waves.

The Andromeda Strain

Less faithful to the original text than Robert Wise’s 1971 film, the current version, whose executive producers include Tony and Ridley Scott, retains the essential elements of the plot: a government satellite on an intergalactic germ-related fact-finding mission crashes into a small town out West, emitting a deadly pathogen that kills everyone nearby save for an unhealthy older man and a baby whose survival is an epidemiological mystery. The military is called in to contain the disaster, and a team of high-status scientific researchers is assembled to determine the capacities of whatever is causing this plague and thus forestall the end of civilization.

cinema full

SQUAREPUSHER

Ufabulum
Soundcrash are proud to present the electronic music innovator that is Squarepusher! Beginning his sonic experiments in 1994, Squarepusher constantly strives to push the boundaries and limits of electronic music. In May 2012 Squarepusher unleashed his latest musical venture ‘Ufabulum’, an album of music generated purely from digital programming, ensuring his influence within today’s global music electronic scene is as vital as ever. For his first headline ‘Ufabulum’ album show in London, Squarepusher will take over the historic music hall Hackney Empire with his largest ever light-show to date! This is a unique opportunity to witness one of electronic music’s pioneers in an extraordinary setting.

JOEL TAUBER

In the 11th century, an English monk named Eilmer believed that the secret of flight was metaphysical. Prayer not science would enable him to fly. Eilmer thought that wings were useful only as mystical tools. Their physical properties were irrelevant. When Eilmer’s wings and prayers helped him believe he could fly, Eilmer leapt from the top of Malmesbury Abbey. Eilmer flew for more than a furlong… but then he crashed. He was crippled for the rest of his life.

PAKUI HARDWARE

Shapeshifter Heartbreaker

Shapeshifter, Heartbreaker, is an installation on two levels composed of sculptural work and 3D computer animations that are both abstract and figurative. On the first level Pakui Hardware has designed an office desk using the typical components of a trading floor. However, this is not a work station for individuals; it is for computer aided trading, non-human activities which are approximated in the three channel videos atop desks noticeably lacking keyboards and mice. These activities often occur at an exceedingly fast pace, in the blink of an eye, an expression that lends its name to a video installed on the second floor. There, the blinks of a humanoid form have been accelerated to illustrate how fast the body would have to consciously react if it were operating at the speed of decision making that resulted in the stock market’s ‘flash crash’ of 2010.

The Chinese Room

Dan Pinchbeck, Robert Briscoe, Jessica Curry, Jacky Morgan, Nigel Carrington, Ben Andrews & Samuel Justice
Dear Esther

“A deserted island… a lost man… memories of a fatal crash… a book written by a dying explorer.”

“Dear Esther” is a ghost story, told using first-person gaming technologies. Rather than traditional game-play the focus here is on exploration, uncovering the mystery of the island, of who you are and why you are here. Fragments of story are randomly uncovered when exploring the various locations of the island, making each journey a unique experience.

file festival

CAITLIN BERRIGAN

Marshmallow Crash

pakui hardware

Shapeshifter, Heartbreaker

Shapeshifter, Heartbreaker, is an installation on two levels composed of sculptural work and 3D computer animations that are both abstract and figurative. On the first level Pakui Hardware has designed an office desk using the typical components of a trading floor. However, this is not a work station for individuals; it is for computer aided trading, non-human activities which are approximated in the three channel videos atop desks noticeably lacking keyboards and mice. These activities often occur at an exceedingly fast pace, in the blink of an eye, an expression that lends its name to a video installed on the second floor. There, the blinks of a humanoid form have been accelerated to illustrate how fast the body would have to consciously react if it were operating at the speed of decision making that resulted in the stock market’s ‘flash crash’ of 2010.
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JONATHAN SCHIPPER

Slow Motion Car Crash

Jonathan Schipper’s work provides an alternative way of experiencing the world by slowing down physical events to almost imperceptible movement. His slow motion car crash sculptures are actual cars moving at speeds of 7mm per hour into a choreographed collision. The spectacular moment of the car crash is rendered safe and almost static. With a dramatic inevitability that reflects our own mortality, over the course of the Festival month the car is eventually destroyed.

david lynch

ДЭВИД ЛИНЧ
ديفيد لينش
大卫·林奇
デビッドリンチ
데이비드 린치
mulholland drive
A dark-haired woman is the sole survivor of a car crash on Mulholland Drive, a winding road high in the Hollywood Hills. Injured and in shock, she makes her way down into Los Angeles and sneaks into an apartment. Later that morning, an aspiring actress named Betty Elms arrives at the apartment, which is normally occupied by her Aunt Ruth. Betty is startled to find the woman, who has amnesia and calls herself “Rita” after seeing a poster for the film Gilda starring Rita Hayworth. To help the woman remember her identity, Betty looks in Rita’s purse, where she finds a large amount of money and an unusual blue key.
cinema

Beth Campbell

Crashing Tables

Joel Morrison

Still Crashing

Pravdoliub Ivanov

Fairytale Device Crashed

Peter Van Eyck

Persian Rug Crash

ANDREAS ANGELIDAKIS

アンドレアス・アンジェリダキス
STUDY FOR CRASH PAD

ROLLIN LEONARD

crash Kiss (Guthrie & Ellis)

JENNY HOLZER

珍妮•霍尔泽
ג’ני הולצר
ジェニー·ホルツァー
제니 홀저
Дженни Хольцер
PROTECT PROTECT centers on Holzer’s work since the 1990s and is the artist’s most comprehensive exhibition in the United States in more than fifteen years. Using language as her medium, Jenny Holzer has created a critically important body of work over the past three decades. Her texts have appeared in nontraditional media such as posters and electronic signs, billboards and T-shirts, and most recently as dematerialized, luminous projections on surfaces as different as crashing ocean waves and the Louvre’s large glass pyramid. Perhaps surprising for those who have followed the work of this artist for many years, her chosen texts recently have been rendered in oil paintings and in dazzling, large-scale electronic sculptures.

FLORENT LAMOUROUX

Chronoplasticite du Crash

JONATHAN SCHIPPER

THE SLOW INEVITABLE DEATH OF AMERICAN MUSCLE
This sculpture, by Jonathan Schipper, is a machine that advances two full sized automobiles slowly into one another, simulating a head on automobile collision. The gear system can be adjusted so that the crash occurs over the period of a few days, up to one year or more. The movement can be made so slow as to be invisible.

BYOUNGHO KIM

БЙОНХО КИМУ
Soft Crash

BITCRAZE

Crazyflie
The Crazyflie quadcopter was started late 2009 as a competence development project in the Swedish consulting company Epsilon AB in which all three of us where employed. This project was done on our free-time with component cost handled by Epsilon. In 2010 we finally decided to send to a video of the Crazyflie to Hackaday.com and that’s when things really took off. More development was done and we decided to make a Crazyflie kit that could be manufactured and sold as an open source development platform. To finance the development and manufacturing of the kit we created Bitcraze AB. At this point we felt that the project had outgrown the Daedalus Projects and decided to launch Bitcraze.se. The Daedalus projects website still exists to show off and advertise other Epsilon competence development project but the Crazyflie now lives in Bitcraze.Crazyflie is a small quadcopter that stated with a simple idea: get an electronic board to fly. We are three electronic engineer from Sweden and we wanted to make a small flying machine that could fly indoor (Sweden is often cold outside ) and with as few mechanical parts as possible. The result of this idea was a small quadcopter that uses its electronic board as main mechanical frame and with motors glued to the PCB:This fist prototype was as simple as possible while following our initial target to be small with the minimum of mechanical thought. After a couple of month of programming and debugging it actually flew and had some success when Hackaday featured it. This prototype was however a lot more frustrating to fly then it appears: each crash was potentially fatal for one or many motors. That made it quite stressful to fly as it would not allow mistake and we eventually broke all 3 prototypes (the red board is the 2.4GHz radio and was also a weak point).