Nathalie Gebert

On Framing Textile Ambiguities
The installation On Framing Textile Ambiguities is the output of a critical investigation on social and technical developments that led to the current local technological situation. As a series of machines, the installation presents itself as a group. They share the same thread and are made from the same components. Each machine is build around a frame, through which the thread is running. Though they are finding various meanings in the encoding due to differences in the widths of the frames.

JON MCCORMACK

Fifty Sisters
“I am an artist and academic based in Melbourne, Australia. I am interested in the creative possibilities of computers and computation, in particular how computers can enhance and augment our creativity. My interests and research are relatively broad: philosophy, evolution, nature, visualisation, interaction design, software, sound, art and the moving image. I prefer the intersections between these fields, rather than the differences that set them apart.” Jon McCormack

Suguru Goto

L’homme transcendé
Suguru Goto explore l’extension des potentialités dans la relation homme-machine. Ses performances joue sur l’interaction entre la représentation vidéo de corps virtuels et les vrais corps présents sur la scène, qui peuvent grâce au BodySuit, transformer ces images en temps réel. Un puzzle est créé autour des différences et des ressemblances entre le vrai corps et le corps virtuel.

Raphael Hillebrand and Christian Mio Loclair

Pow2045
The mathematical construct covers the human body, yet sets a contrast to organic shapes in its accuracy and mechanical precision. This kind of visual contrast can be understood as a visual representation of human computer difference and reveals core features of both – man and machine. A characteristic foundation to design the dialogue of “POW 2045″

Denis Villeneuve

Arrival

“Arrival’s narrative plays out in four languages: English, Mandarin, Russian and Heptapod. Though they are not spoken in the film, we learn that Louise is also fluent in Farsi, Sanskrit and Portuguese (and possibly others). The language learning process and the growing translingual bond between Louise and the heptapods forms the film’s narrative arc and the majority of its plot. Thus language, and specifically the mechanics of ←215 | 216→multilingualism, is Arrival’s central theme. Within this context, the ability to communicate across language barriers is an asset, and the flexibility to navigate new linguistic challenges is invaluable. The heptapods are pure science fiction, but serve a powerful metaphorical function. As Emily Alder (2016) writes in The Conversation, “ultimately, Arrival is less about communicating with the aliens than with each other – internationally but also individually […] The film’s message is that difference is not about body shape or colour but language, culture and ways of thinking. It’s not about erasing that difference but communicating through it”. Gemma King

benjamin bergery and jim campbell

Jacob’dream: a luminous path
San Francisco-based electronic-media artist Jim Campbell creates work that combines film, light emitting diodes (LEDs) and sculptural elements. His choice of materials is often complex, and he uses them to create imagery that is allusive and open-ended. His exploration of the distinction between the analog world and its digital representation metaphorically parallels the difference between poetic understanding versus the mathematics of data.

Strijbos & Van Rijswijk

whispers
Blue lightening discs seem to hang freely in a darkened space. They’re the horns of five more than man-sized ceramic trumpets, arranged in various directions. The white inside is radiated with blacklight, as it turns out when your eyes have adapted to the darkness. The horns transmit words, fragments of sentences, laughter, alternated with noise and a strange crackles and sputters. Each trumpet has it’s own repertory of expressions, of which the meaning is hard to probe. And each has it’s own characteristic sound, due to their difference in length.

Alice Channer

алиса Чанер
I Cannot Tell The Difference Between One Thing And Another

YING GAO

Indice de l’indifférence
Montreal-based fashion designer and professor at UQAM, recipient of the Phyllis-Lambert Design Montréal Grant, Ying Gao questions our assumptions about clothing by combining urban design, architecture and multimedia. She explores the construction of the garment, taking her inspiration from the transformations of the social and urban environment.

Thomas Bayrle

Telefon Portrait
Thomas Bayrle (*1937) has been invited to Museum Ludwig’s main gallery to install an overview of his works from the last 40 years that all explore a particular artistic strategy: the loop or looping. While a loop is a kind of ring, the activity of looping refers to the continual repetition of the one and the same motif, whether in Rap music or by constantly running through the same sequence when writing a computer programme. Just such a game between difference and repetition has developed in Thomas Bayrle’s graphic oeuvre

Rina Banerjee

She’s my country
The Indian born, New York City based artist Rina Banerjee has a love of materials, heritage textiles, ethnicity and fashion, colonial objects and furnishings, historical architecture, and their ability to disguise, animate, locate their inherent meanings in her art work. While sculptures and drawings, paintings use a fusion of cultures and unravel our connected experiences an explosion of differences alternate the way we receive our identity. Banerjee says her work explores “specific colonial moments that reinvent place and identity as complex diasporic experiences intertwined and sometimes surreal.”

Lucinda Childs

Pastime

Pastime takes place in three different spatial locations so that the simple in-place theme with the flexed foot can be presented in three difference situations: vertical, enclosed (in tubular jersey), and upside down.

Dancer: Gabrielle Revlock

Design I/O

Theo Watson, Emily Gobeille and Nick Hardeman
Connected Worlds
Connected Worlds is an immersive, interactive ecosystem that was designed for the New York Hall of Science. It’s an installation of six smaller ecosystems, actually—all of which are connected, much like real ecosystems are. The difference here is that the environments only exist on massive screens connected by a 3,000-ft² interactive floor.

YOKO ISHII AND HIROSHI HOMURA

It´s fire, you can touch it

On the other hand, an example of a work representing a difference in which the viewer is faced with participation in the event, is an installation by Yoko Ishii and Hiroshi Homura It’s fire, you can’t touch it (2007). In this work which appoints the active environment, onto the hands reached out by the participants, miniature light signs are projected—a Japanese tanka poem is running through, glyphs change form, fuse together, move. Here we deal with a poetic spectacle in which the perspective of cognitive interactivity, set off in contact with poetry, is complemented by tactile sensations and poems themselves are as if extracted from the environment by interactive gestures of receivers-readers.

BARAKA KECAK

“Baraka is a documentary that starts from an old word with meanings in several languages. It can be translated as a blessing, breath or essence of life, from where the process of world evolution is triggered. The film reveals how much humanity is interconnected, despite the differences in religion, culture and language of the peoples. A true visual poem without narration or caption, only images and sounds carefully captured and articulated through an expressive montage, which makes each take add the next other meaning, whose theme is… After all, what is Baraka about? I believe that each viewer of the film sees a different theme. It can be about the strength of planet Earth. It may be about the multiple diversities that unite us. It can be a lot. Baraka is a visual reproduction of the human connection with the Earth ”