Heinrich Bulthoff

Cable Robot Simulator
Max-Planck-Institut für biologische Kybernetik

Eight steel cables, each with 1.4 tons of tensions, hold aloft a caged platform with a seat for one person. Using a wireless VR headset, that person can simulate experiences like flight while being zoomed in dozens of different ways. Eight retracting cables connected to a winch pull on the cage. It’s like a giant, flying VR jungle gym.

Kenny Wong

Squint
file festival
I was inspired by how the sunlight bounces around in our artificial forest.
“Squint” is a kinetic light installation consisting of 49 mirrors that reflect lights in a bright space. The mirrors track and reflect lights on audiences’ face with composed patterns of movements. It extends the generated perception by focusing on how lights pass across our visual senses physically, and combines with our perception of images through flickering. “Squint”, which extracts various daily experiences to an abstraction brings the audience to expand their interpretation of lights and perceived imagination into a non-linear experience.
“Squint” simulates light source and intentionally shines lights on audience’s faces. Bright light is projected in the gallery, a clean bright space.
Everyday people are dynamically moving around in the city. Sunlight reflects and flickers even when it is indirect and hidden behind the artifacts. While we are traveling, we are experiencing motion. We are also experiencing the shift of light intensity, visual patterns and textures. The varieties of light forms inspire the artist to explore the potential of light textures, select and sort out the combined complexity in urban space. The artist turns them into a minimal form of light experience, while maximizing its diversity of perception.

LEAH MEDIN

The Gold Divide
“I visualized The Gold Divide as a transparent wall; a large surface representing emotion and energy. The piece was inspired by my experiences studying abroad in Amsterdam, time spent at Haystack Mountain School of Crafts and the community at Massachusetts College of Art and Design. It was a cumulation of observations and experiences—like riding my bike through the city of Boston and seeing vast construction netting wrapped around buildings. These large surfaces of material triggered my fascination for creating work at an enormous scale. I reflected on process, on how something is made, and was further intrigued by the challenge and symbolism of independently sewing four hundred yards of fabric on a single industrial sewing machine.” Leah Medin

OLAFUR ELIASSON

L’ouverture indicible des choses
Le titre de l’exposition, L’ouverture indicible des choses, est une phrase que le philosophe Timothy Morton utilise pour décrire l’art et qui résonne fortement avec l’artiste. Eliasson décrit comment «l’art existe à la fois dans et au-delà du domaine de la langue. Avant que la forme d’une œuvre n’émerge, il y a un sentiment pas tout à fait saisissable qui pénètre dans le processus artistique – et qui reste dans l’œuvre finie comme quelque chose qui ne peut pas être pleinement exprimé. Dans le même temps, l’œuvre est fondamentalement ouverte aux visiteurs. Il est prêt à les écouter et à accueillir leurs questions et leurs expériences. »

carsten holler

Decimal Clock
dans Decimal Clock (White and Pink), les instincts rationalistes de Höller se tournent vers la division du temps. L’horloge fonctionnelle, qui représente 10 heures, 100 minutes et 100 secondes, nous rappelle que l’homogénéisation globale du temps n’a eu lieu que récemment en réponse au degré sans précédent d’interconnexion planétaire. Decimal Clock (White and Pink) fait signe aux expériences avec le temps décimal pendant la Révolution française et rend hommage aux efforts visant à la comparabilité et à la régularité temporelles. Pourtant, il reconnaît également diverses manières non occidentales de mesurer le temps et, plutôt que de les voir comme une menace pour l’empire de la raison , les célèbre comme une expression enrichissante de la diversité de notre existence dans le temps.

BILL VIOLA

The Raft
The Raft depicts at life-sized scale a group of ordinary people casually standing together. Suddenly, they are struck by strong blasts of water that rush in, overtake them, and then, just as unexpectedly, recede. In the aftermath of the deluge, the victims huddle together, seek protection, and help those who have fallen. The viewer experiences this event in an immersive setting, standing in a darkened room and surrounded by the roaring sounds of the water. Meticulously captured in slow-motion, The Raft arouses a visceral experience of human calamity and shared humanity, provoking a consideration of the range of responses to crisis.

MAIKO TAKEDA

ATMOSPHERIC REENTRY
“While hats are commonly made with substantial and durable materials such as fabric, felt, plastic, leather so on, instead I wanted to create ethereal experiences for the wearer through the pieces. Through the experiment process, I developed the technique to create a visual effect of intangible aura by layering printed clear film, sandwiched with acrylic discs and linked together with silver jump rings.”

Zilvinas Kempinas

Waves
WAVES is an attempt to return to basic experiences provided by light and sound. The intersecting waves of ligh and sound are creating a multi-layered spectrum, which allows us to experience ourselves and others as different wavelengths: either intertwining or dissolving.

Can Buyukberber

Noumenon
Noumenon is a site-specific large-scale architectural and year-long installation in ZeroSpace, New York City; a compilation of Buyukberber’s last 4 year of audiovisual work and explorations; from emergent systems to out-of-body experiences; from transcendental objects to the symbols of the collective unconscious.

Bahar Yürükoğlu

Flow Through

“Flow Through takes as its departure point Bahar Yürükoğlu’s experiences during her travels to the Arctic Circle in 2015, both in the summertime, when the sun doesn’t set, and during the winter months, when darkness prevails. In the exhibition, the artist creates fictional spaces based on the dualities she observed in the Arctic region; blurring the boundaries between presence and absence, past and future, nature and civilisation, as well as cyclical movements and inevitable transformations, these installations, photographs and videos test the viewer’s perceptive capacities, and demand that the dichotomy between the subject and the object is set aside”. Duygu Demir

studio Melt

Turbulence
TURBULENCE is an ongoing series of immersive experiences created for large-scale, high-resolution media environments that embosom the viewer in digital flow of particles.It’s a set of visual experiments on particles simulated in different virtual environments.

Helene Nymann

MOL
MOL (2018) takes up the ancient technique of memorizing information by placing symbols and signs along a mental path through an imagined house from room to room. Interested in the way technology affects both our sense of and need for memory, Nymann attempts to capture her own active and associative thinking by reconstructing her path through her abandoned childhood home. In the work, she visualizes her past experiences through the placement of anchor objects—which, according to the ancient Greco-Roman method of loci, shape the way we perceive the external world—suggesting that in our increasing reliance on technology to memorize for us, we allow others to form our view of the world.

Arcangelo Sassolino

Damnatio Memoriae

From the Latin, damnatio memoriae describes an act of erasure from the historical record reserved for
those who have brought dishonor to the Roman State. Employed as the most stringent punishment for
treason, damnatio memoriae physically razes all traces of an individual from society, typically through
the destruction a statue’s physiognomy or the abrasion of inscribed monuments. Throughout the past
two decades, Sassolino has developed a body of work that examines the relationship between industrial
machines and humanist impulses where viewers are meant to question how an sculpture’s kinetic
function aesthetically and conceptually allegorizes human experiences and cultural conditions.

Refik Anadol

Machine Hallucination
Refik Anadol’s most recent synesthetic reality experiments deeply engage with these centuries-old questions and attempt at revealing new connections between visual narrative, archival instinct and collective consciousness. The project focuses on latent cinematic experiences derived from representations of urban memories as they are re-imagined by machine intelligence. For Artechouse’s New York location, Anadol presents a data universe of New York City in 1025 latent dimensions that he creates by deploying machine learning algorithms on over 100 million photographic memories of New York City found publicly in social networks. Machine Hallucination thus generates a novel form of synesthetic storytelling through its multilayered manipulation of a vast visual archive beyond the conventional limits of the camera and the existing cinematographic techniques. The resulting artwork is a 30-minute experimental cinema, presented in 16K resolution, that visualizes the story of New York through the city’s collective memories that constitute its deeply-hidden consciousness.

olafur eliasson

オラファー·エリアソン
اولافور الياسون
奥拉维尔·埃利亚松
אולאפור אליאסון
ОЛАФУР ЭЛИАССОН
The unspeakable openness of things
The title of the exhibition, The unspeakable openness of things, is a phrase that philosopher Timothy Morton uses when describing art and it resonates strongly with the artist. Eliasson describes how “Art exists both in and beyond the realm of language. Before the form of an artwork emerges, there’s a not-quite-graspable feeling that flows into the artistic process – and that remains in the finished work as something that cannot be fully expressed. At the same time, the artwork is fundamentally open to visitors. It is ready to listen to them, and able to host their questions and experiences.”

Barbora Kotěšovcová

IT’S A GAME FOR US
“How do we perceive mistakes and flaws and how important are those for us?” Barbora asks herself. “When a human being experiences and errs, they create a protective immunity for similar upcoming events, which they will, hopefully, solve better. Therefore, through these fashion pieces, I tried to communicate something that disrupts our personal comfort. Although we might not be fans, we need such disruptions because they push our comfort zone further and make us feel better in the long run.” Barbora Kotěšovcová

PEEPING TOM

le Salon
Peeping Tom est une compagnie de danse-théâtre bruxelloise fondée en 2000 par Gabriela Carrizo et Franck Chartier. Leur travail recherche le comportement idiosyncratique dans les relations et expériences personnelles, ce qui fait du public un voyeur dans le monde réaliste mais onirique qu’ils créent.

amy winters

thunderstorm dress
My background in Theatre and Art-Direction served as the initial catalyst for my work – with a drive to create new experiences for the audience. Major inspirations included filmmakers and animators such as Terry Gilliam and Jan Švankmajer.

frank kolkman and juuke schoorl

file sao paulo 2018
“Outrospectre” is an experimental proposal for a medical device aimed at reconciling people with death through simulating out-of-body experiences. In healthcare the majority of efforts and research focus on keeping people alive. The fear and experience of death is a mostly neglected topic. Recent (para) psychological research, however, suggests that the sensation of drifting outside of one’s own body using virtual reality technology could help reduce death anxiety. “Outrospectre” explores the possible application of these findings in hospital surroundings where it could help terminal patients accept their own mortality with more comfort.
This project investigates unanswered questions about mortality and ‘end of life’.

ANN HAMILTON

アン·ハミルトン
앤 해밀턴
the event of a thread

Ann Hamilton is a visual artist internationally recognized for the sensory surrounds of her large-scale multi-media installations. Using time as process and material, her methods of making serve as an invocation of place, of collective voice, of communities past and of labor present. Noted for a dense accumulation of materials, her ephemeral environments create immersive experiences that poetically respond to the architectural presence and social history of their sites.

Birch Cooper and Brenna Murphy

MSHR is a collaborative project by New York-based artists Birch Cooper and Brenna Murphy. The duo produces sculptural synthesizers, ritualistic installations and performances that use light and audio feedback to generate sensory experiences. MSHR emerged in 2011 from the five-person art collective Oregon Painting Society.

NICHOLAS ALAN COPE AND DUSTIN EDWARD ARNOLD

PLOKHOV
Nicholas et Dustin ont tous deux eu diverses expériences dans la photographie et le design en général. Ils se sont rencontrés lors d’une commande d’un client en 2007. Depuis, ils se retrouvent pour expérimenter et mélanger leurs talents pour donner naissance à des projets très engagés esthétiquement[…]

Kader Attou

The roots
The Roots c’est 12 danseurs et chorégraphes au parcours chargés d’expériences qui incarnent cette création sur scène avec une force, une générosité, un poésie, une technicité et une sincérité sans borne. Comme aime dire Kader des danseurs d’excellence au service de cette création, The Roots “les racines” le lien direct avec ces quelques 30 années de hip hop que nous avons parcouru, de h.i.p h.o.p présenté par Sidney et nos cartons de training dans la rue, jusqu’aux scènes les plus prestigieuse d’europe et du monde. .

NICHOLAS ALAN COPE AND DUSTIN EDWARD ARNOLD

Vedas
Nicholas et Dustin ont tous deux eu diverses expériences dans la photographie et le design en général. Ils se sont rencontrés lors d’une commande d’un client en 2007. Depuis, ils se retrouvent pour expérimenter et mélanger leurs talents pour donner naissance à des projets très engagés esthétiquement (comprendre : pas forcément du goût de tout le monde).

Bas Louter

Car 2

In Los Angeles he made a series of drawings based on a mix of old glamor images from the film industry and geometric, machine patterns. Los Angeles inspires Bas through the great social contrasts, the visual culture and, in particular, the dominant influence of the film industry. He experiences moving through the city as a journey through time. In this place, history seems distorted and memories erased.

doris chase

Circles II
Doris Chase has achieved international stature as a pioneer in the field of video art since she moved from Seattle to New York City in 1972. An artist of remarkable and continuous creativity, Chase now divides her time between her video headquarters in New York and a Seattle studio where she works on new projects in painting and sculpture.Beginning as an innovative painter and sculptor in Seattle in the 1950s, Chase created sculpture that was meant to be touched and manipulated by the viewer. Chase then developed large-scale kinetic sculptures in collaboration with choreographers, and her art was set in motion by dancers. In New York, her majors contribution to the evolution of artists’ video has been her work in videodance. On videotape, dancers and sculpture evolve into luminous abstract forms which represent some of the most sophisticated employments of video technology by an artist of the 1970s. In the 1980s, Chase began working in the nascent genre of video theater. In these productions, she uses the imtimacy of the video screen to achieve a new synthesis of visual and dramatic art. Her video theatre compositions present multicultural and social commentary, utilizing scripts by writers such as Lee Breuer, Thulani Davis, and Jessica Hagedorn in the “Concepts” series. Collaborating with actresses Geralding Page, Ann Jackson, Roberta Wallach, Joan Plowright, and Luise Riner in the “By Herself” series, she focuses on the viewpoints and experiences of older women. Today, coming full circle, Doris Chase in Seattle is exploring a renewed interest in painting and sculpture as well as in the modernist aesthetic she never really ceased pursuing, even during her most adventuresome multimedia years.

MAR CANET & CARLES GUTIERREZ

videomaton
File Festival

The initial idea was to engage audiences with the classical paintings. The installation tries to transform the classical portraits into memorable and playful experiences. In short, by looking into a mirror a face of participant is captured by the system. Next, the captured face travels into one of the classical portraits. Hence, the viewer is invited into the gallery in order to recognize him or herself in one of the paintings. In other words, the art piece replaces the original painted faces by the faces of the audience. To be more specific, the authors have created an original face-morphing that integrates itself into the well-know portraits, like Meninas by Goya. To put in a nutshell, the common experience of modern art is replaced by a novel, playful and enjoyable encounter. The installation creates a framework of expression where audience spontaneously and freely interact in front of a mirror knowing that they are recorded. The results are experience by all audience in the gallery. The project was produced in 2011 as a commission of interactive art project for the new City Council of Madrid curated by Chema Conesa. “Videomaton” was presented in the opening of new City Council of Madrid located in the Cibeles square. The installation was exhibited for a year in the institution. The aim of the exhibit was displaying the famous art pieces of Madrid museums in a novel way.

EDUARDO SRUR

אדוארדו סרור
Boat
Festival Serrinha

Eduardo Srur, from São Paulo, started painting, but stood out in urban interventions. His works use the public space to draw attention to environmental issues and daily life in the metropolises, always with the objective of expanding the presence of art in society and bringing it closer to people’s lives. The city is your research laboratory for the practice of artistic experiences; the public and governments are his target. Srur’s set of works serves as a guide for poorly managed spaces and urban errors. Above all, they are conceptual criticisms that awaken awareness and look at a new aesthetic and understanding of the visual arts.

CILDO MEIRELES

babel

Babel consists of around 800 radios of varying ages, from the beautiful, large, valve radios which make up the bottom tiers of the tower to the smaller mass-produced electronic radios of recent years which form its summit. By using radios of decreasing size from the floor to the ceiling, Meireles emphasises the perspective and the sheer height of the work.
Furthermore, Babel constitutes a survey of radios from the 1920s to the present day, which in turn presents what the artist has described as ‘an archaeological sample of events’. Due to the time-based nature of the medium of radio, no two experiences of this work are ever the same.