ARTECHOUSE

Aqueous
Inspired by the color blue’s calming qualities, Aqueous is a deep dive into our water-filled surroundings. Whether looking out at the vast horizon of the ocean or listening to the bubbling flow of a stream, water instills a sense of peace and relaxation. Through exploring the textures of liquid in all its states, this immersive installation seeks to soothe the spirit and inspire action to preserve this natural resource.

Doug Aitken

Sonic Fountain II

An excavation filled with milky water, Sonic Fountain is surmounted by nine taps distributed in a grid which taste according to a precisely written score. In the water, microphones record the sound of drops of water – sound broadcast live in space, like a concert. In the artist’s words, Sonic Fountain “is a deliberately abstract work that bares architecture and reveals its rhythm, tempo and language”.

Sally Potter

Orlando
Noble Orlando is condemned by Queen Elizabeth I to remain forever young. The curse is fulfilled and Orlando goes through the centuries experiencing lives, partners, feelings and gender changes. The film is based on the classic novel by Virgina Woolf, in which an innocent aristocrat travels for 400 years in English history – first as a man, then as woman
cinema full

CHRISTO

Христо
big air package
Big Air Package is the largest indoor sculpture in the world. It measures 90 meters in height and 50 meters in diameter. Visitors can enter the inner space of the balloon through airlocks. Inside, Big Air Package reminds of a cathedral that is filled with a diffuse light. Big Air Package is the first project realized without Christo’s late wife and artistic partner Jeanne-Claude.

Carsten Nicolai

reflektor distortion

The installation reflektor distortion – conceived as a rotating, water-filled basin – is inspired by the shape of a parabolic mirror that ‚rotates‘ water via centrifugal force. The work consists of the three main components mirror, reflection and distortion. Both curve and distortion of the water surface is affected by speed and integrated resistors that generate a permanently new and re-organizing mirror reflection. The water surface will be supplementary distorted via speaker by resonating low sound frequencies. The function of the mirror is hereby eminent: The mirror surface is the medium that reveals reality as distorted reflection. Rising the question of the observed and the real image the installation plays with the artist’s thesis that we all have a permanent distorted perception of reality.

ecoLogicStudio

BioBombola
The Coral
Home Algae Garden
In June 2020 ecoLogicStudio has devised BioBombola, a pioneering project that invites individuals, families and communities to cultivate a domestic algae garden – a sustainable source of vegetable proteins. BioBombola absorbs carbon dioxide and oxygenates homes more effectively than common domestic plants while fostering a fulfilling daily interaction with nature. Each BioBombola is composed of a single customized photobioreactor, a one metre tall lab grade glass container, filled with 15 litres of living photosynthetic Spirulina strain and culture medium with nutrients.

Tommi Grönlund-Petteri Nisunen

LIQUID DIAGRAM
Twelve installation units formed a line across the exhibition space. Each unit consisted of a round-bottom flask in a stainles steel stand, with a vertical glass tube attached. Each flask was filled about a quarter-full with distilled water. When a resistance coil heated the air inside the flask, it expanded, forcing the water up into the glass tube. The level of the water rose when the air was being heated and began to drop slowly as it cooled down.

DOUG AITKEN

ダグエイケン
道格·艾特肯
sonic fountain

A large round hole—if it were a hot tub, it would be comfortably orgy-sized—has been gouged roughly out of the slick concrete floor of 303 Gallery and filled with milky gray water. Attached to the black duct-work and girders of the ceiling directly above it is a square of pipe surrounded by a speaker array. In the center of the square and at each of its corners is a computer-controlled spigot, dripping, spitting or jetting out, in a rhythmically complex 15-minute cycle, milky water pumped up from the pit in a closed circuit. This is Doug Aitken’s Sonic Fountain.

LIVIN Studio

Fungi Mutarium
Fungi Mutarium is a prototype that grows edible fungal biomass as a novel food product. Fungi is cultivated on specifically designed agar shapes that the designers called “FU”. Agar is a seaweed based gelatin substitute and acts, mixed with starch and sugar, as a nutrient base for the fungi. The “FUs” are filled with plastics. The fungi is then inserted, it digests the plastic and overgrows the whole substrate. The shape of the “FU” is designed so that it holds the plastic and to offer the fungi a lot of surface to grow on.
Its shape has been developed inspired by mushrooms and other plants in nature. The user should be reminded of harvesting mushrooms in the forest when harvesting the “FUs”.
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Cerith Wyn Evans

СЕРИС ВИН ЭВАНС
ケリス·ウィン·エヴァンス
Form in Space…By Light

‘Cerith’s installation sits beautifully within the space, unfolding as you walk through,’ explains Clarrie Wallis, Tate’s Senior Curator of Contemporary British Art. The neon experience builds, from a single ‘peep hole’ ring in the South Duveens, through which you can glimpse swirls of radial light and an imposing octagon in the central gallery. The fractured neon fragments look like frantically drawn sparkler-lines on fireworks night.But there’s method and logic within these celestial scribbles. Hidden in the design are references to a host of highbrow sources, from Japanese ‘Noh’ theatre, to Marcel Duchamp’s The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass), 1915-23. Don’t worry if you missed them. The beauty of rendering precise (verging on obscure) references in such a celebratory neon explosion allows for multiple – if not endless – interpretations.Each way you look at the sprawling 2km of neon tubing, a different shape or symbol emerges. No small thanks to the elegant way in which the structures have been painstakingly suspended. ‘There were over 1000 fixing points, and obviously we couldn’t drill 1000 holes in the Grade II listed building,’ Wallis explains. ‘We had to work with structural engineers very intensely, so as to be completely happy and convinced that we would be able to remove it without damaging the fabric of the building.’Though it seems too soon to be discussing the installation’s removal, Wallis has a point. It’s a visibly fragile, delicate sculpture – whose impermanence makes it more intriguing. As it is a site-specific sculpture, it can’t be recreated elsewhere. What’s more, because the neon tubes are filled with a constantly moving stream of pulsing, vibrating gasses, visitors will never see the same sculpture twice.

CINESTEIKA

Dina Khuseyn, Patrick K.-H., Oleg Makarov

A multivarious result of visual representation of 3 non-identical structures (dance performance, sound art and animation) points at interactivity as the main possible axis of reference. Necessity of this axis derives from specific interpretations that can only appear by juxtaposing of several systems. It opposes to traditional “parallelism” of media, employed in theater that only imitates causality, but having it already done before performance is starting.
In Cinestetika, each element of each media works as separate PROCESS, but also serves a SIGNAL to other medias. This essential core makes Cinestetika rather an instrument to make a term “live performance” filled with its perfect sense.

SPLITTERWERK

bio intelligence quotient house
Dubbed the Bio Intelligent Quotient (BIQ) House, the approximately €5 million building was designed by Splitterwerk Architects and funded by the Internationale Bauausstellung (IBA), a long-running exhibition series showcasing cutting edge techniques and architectural concepts, for this year’s International Building Exhibition – 2013.
A total of 129 algae culturing tanks are affixed to the East and West sides of the building via an automated external scaffolding structure that constantly turns the tanks towards the sun. The plant cultures are fed through an integrated tubing system, CO2 is pumped in as well.According to Arup’s Europe Research Leader, Jan Wurm, who collaborated with Splitterwerk on the project:The algae flourish and multiply in a regular cycle until they can be harvested. They are then separated from the rest of the algae and transferred as a thick pulp to the technical room of the BIQ. The little plants are then fermented in an external biogas plant, so that they can be used again to generate biogas. Algae are particularly well suited for this, as they produce up to five times as much biomass per hectare as terrestrial plants and contain many oils that can be used for energy.Not only do these tanks provide shade for every level of the building during the summer and biogas for heating during the winter, the facade itself collects excess heat not being used by the algae, like a solar thermal system. That heat can then either be used immediately or stored in 80-meter-deep, borine-filled borehole heat exchangers located under the structure. Total fossil fuels used in this process: zero.

ANISH KAPOOR

阿尼什•卡普尔
アニッシュ·カプーア
Аниш Капур
Arcelor Mittal Orbit
Award winning London-based artist Anish Kapoor has been given the commission of a lifetime to design the spectacular new public attraction in the Olympic Park. The stunning artwork, to be entitled ‘The ArcelorMittal Orbit’, will ensure the Park remains an unrivalled visitor destination following the 2012 Games, providing the key Olympic legacy Mayor of London Boris Johnson envisaged for the East End.The breathtaking sculpture – thought to be the tallest in the UK – will consist of a continuous looping lattice of tubular steel. Standing at a gigantic 115m, it will be 22m taller than the Statue of Liberty in New York and offer unparalleled views of the entire 250 acres of the Olympic Park and London’s skyline from a special viewing platform. Visitors will be able to take a trip up the statuesque structure in a huge lift and will have the option of walking down the spiralling staircase.One of the world’s most distinguished contemporary artists, Turner Prize winning Anish Kapoor studied in London, where he is now based. He is well known for his use of rich pigment and imposing, yet popular works, such as the vast, fleshy and trumpet-like Marsyas, which filled the Tate’s Turbine Hall as part of the Unilever Series, the giant reflecting, pod like sculpture Cloud Gate in Chicago’s Millennium Park and his recent record breaking show at the Royal Academy, the most successful exhibition ever presented by a contemporary artist in London.