Ei Wada

Toki Ori Ori Nasu – Falling Records
In this work, open reel tape recorders are placed on top of high pedestals and, as they play back, the magnetic tape unspools down into plastic receptacle below. The tape that accumulates in the container piles up as time passes, weaving an unusual pattern in the space. When the tape stops accumulating it is wound back up at high speed to a symphonic soundtrack. The pattern that had existed until then is extinguished and a new pattern is then woven.
FILE FESTIVAL

nobumichi asai

INORI (Prayer)
The latest work to utilize real time tracking and face projection mapping using a state of the art 1000 fps projector and ultra high speed sensing, “INORI-prayer-,“ has been released. This project was born by the collaboration with Nobumichi Asai (WOW) ,the dancing duo AyaBambi, and the Ishikawa Watanabe Laboratory (the University of Tokyo), TOKYO.

APPURU PAI

high speed rail transit

Myriam Bleau

SOFT REVOLVERS
Soft Revolvers is a music performance for 4 spinning tops built with clear acrylic by the artist. Each spinning top, 10’ in diameter, is associated with an ‘instrument’ or part in an electronic music composition. The tops are equipped with gyroscopes and accelerometers that communicate wirelessly with a computer where the motion data collected (speed,unsteadiness at the end of a spin, acceleration spikes in case of collisions) informs musical algorithms designed in Pure Data. LEDs placed inside the tops illuminate the body of the objects in a precise counterpoint to the music.

YOUNG-HAE CHANG

장영혜중공업
Heavy Industries
dakota
I discuss how the poem controls the reader’s experience and how this control affects its possible interpretations. The control is mostly executed by limiting the reader’s freedom over reading. Reading time, direction and duration are determined by the poem. It is only possible to start the poem, but not rewind, stop or fast-forward it. Furthermore, the manipulation of speed affects reading in many ways. In the fast extreme the effect is illegibility, but more subtly used speed creates varieties of emphasis and de-emphasis. The effect of emphasis of this kind, I argue, creates different layers of readings and invites re-reading. These different readings require different cognitive modes, which mirror our contemporary reading habits. Not being in control of the reading process also leads to a scattered sense of unity, one of postmodernism’s essential traits. While reading the poem I also question why I read as I do, and by doing so I hope to present more general traits of how to approach digital literature.

JULIUS VON BISMARCK

versuch unter kreisen

This is the artistic result of a residency spent at CERN, where particles circulate on rings at great speed. The four lamps that are suspended from the ceiling also describe circles, but at varying speeds. Starting from there, every imaginable choreography is possible as well as every interpretation. The lamps describe figures that imperceptible transitions trigger one to the other. According to the artist, it’s only a question of mathematics here, though one asks oneself which one of the four incandescent lamps directs the others. And just as quick as they come into alignment as though linked by invisible ties, there is one that seems to accelerate while another can’t manage to keep up with the group. You can watch them for hours on end, hypnotised by the aesthetic beauty of physical laws. The artist, Julius von Bismarck, when receiving his prize admitted to having learned a lot at the CERN. It is likely that the scientists were also marked by his presence.
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Refik Anadol Studios

Wind of Boston: Data Paintings
Wind of Boston: Data Paintings is a site-specific work that turns the invisible patterns of wind in and around Boston into a series of poetic data paintings within a 6’ x 13’ digital canvas. By using a one-year data set collected from Boston Logan Airport, Refik Anadol Studios developed a series of custom software to read, analyze and visualize wind speed, direction, and gust patterns along with time and temperature at 20-second intervals throughout the year.

VIVIAN BEER

I employ visual cues culled from mass culture, excerpt processes from industry and patterns from the decorative arts to create handmade, one-off objects that manifest the nostalgia of history, the speed of progress and the memory of the human hand.

Michael Pinsky

Transparent Room
Transparent Room suspends viewers in a virtual space where they see through walls to hidden rooms and city streets, and through ceilings to the sky. The room’s confining walls are replaced by projections of the outside world, its time accelerated as clouds speed by and as cars and pedestrians alike race down the street. In this caricatured passing of time, views of the cityscape and of the building’s interiors are magnified, first showing details, then textures and, finally, just single colours.

Mai Yamashita + Naoto Kobayashi

infinity
filefestival
“Paths are made by walking.” In order to determine whether the above phrase was actually true, Yamashita and Kobayashi kept running in a park for five days. In the fast-forward movie compiled from digital photographs taken one per second, a path with the shape of infinity gradually emerges as they move in high-speed.

barbara cole

White Noise
“I rework this canvas with a toolkit that includes clouds, reflections, plastic sheeting, cloth-encased figures as well as aperture, shutter speed and artificial lighting. I will photograph from above in order to flatten the perspective[…]” more

Benedikt Groß

The Autonomous Human Drone Taxi

We keep hearing how technology will eventually solve the problem of vehicular traffic for good. Self-driving cars will only get us halfway to that future — they’re still cars, clogging up our roads, speeding down our freeways. The personal mobility future that I’m waiting for includes autonomous drone taxis that can sail high over the city, delivering me safely to my destination.

STOCKHAUSEN

Cosmic Pulses
COSMIC PULSES is the 13th “hour” of Stockhausen’s originally-planned 24-part cycle KLANG (“SOUND”) which is based on the 24 hours of the day. This electronic work is composed of 24 layers of synthesizer-generated melodic material, with each layer having a different speed and pitch register. The layers enter one by one, starting from the lowest/slowest layer, and go up in sequence to the highest/fastest layer. After a period of several minutes where all 24 layers are active, the layers begin to individually drop out, again starting from the lowest layers and moving upwards (gradually leaving just the higher/faster layers). This “draw down” is about twice as fast as in the “build-up”.