Jonna Kina

Arr. for a Scene

“The sonic force of cinema’s most famous murder scene is investigated.Two foley artists recreate Hitchcock’s shower sequence, deconstructing the associations of aural signifiers, and the synesthetic power of sound. Jonna Kina contextualize this uncanny phenomenon — the “trans-sensory” quality of sound – within both Kina’s oeuvre, as well as other historical and contemporary works inside and outside the realm of art. In Arr. for a Scene (2017), Kina explores the structures and forms of cinematic sound – transforming an iconic image — the horrific shower scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho (1960) – into the sonic frequencies of quirky, seemingly innocent, domestic objects.” Melissa Ragona

 

Rob and Nick Carter

Transforming Nude Painting
The Transforming series was inspired by a lack of museum visitors attention which spans in between two and four seconds. Therefore, the Carters have decided to accentuate certain elements of the iconic artworks in order to make the observer look more closely. “It is not uncommon now for people to move around galleries and fairs at a swift pace, with their phones out ready to capture artworks and maybe even the descriptions if they’re particularly interested. We, therefore, enjoy seeing viewers take a second glance at the Transforming works, taken aback with surprise when the content of the paintings move, encouraging them to examine the works in greater depth, for a longer amount of time.” The Carters

Kaws

Expanded Holiday
Expanded Holiday demonstrated the enormous potential of AR technology, which provides virtual perspectives on real-world environments, and conveys KAWS’s mischievous humour through the juxtaposition of physical and virtual worlds. These virtual sculptures were accessible via the Acute Art app and could be experienced in conjunction with the NGV’s exclusive exhibition KAWS: Companionship in the Age of Loneliness, a comprehensive survey of 25 years of KAWS’s oeuvre and his largest solo survey to date. Full of humour, hope and humanity, the exhibition featured more than 100 works including iconic paintings reappropriating pop-culture figures to more recent largescale, layered works, and an impressive collection of KAWS’s celebrated sculptural figures.

CRAIG GREEN

Moncler’s Genius 2020 Collection
The british fashion designer reinterpreted the brand’s iconic expression as a series of monochrome designs resembling padded samurai armour and brightly colored inflatables[…] Injecting flat sheets with down quilting, Craig Green uses a series of zips that allow the body to inhabit the garments and give them volume. Further defined by outlines printed on the outside, each piece is clad in ripstop nylon, a light-weight nylon fabric with interwoven ripstop reinforcement threads in a crosshatch pattern.

Richard Quinn

Moncler’s Genius Fall 2020
Since its inception, the Moncler genius project has asked designers coming from diverse cultures to create capsule collections inspired by the iconic Moncler puffer jacket. For his collection, london-based designer Richard Quinn visited the retro-futurism of the sixties. With clear influences like stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey and Twiggy, the collection perfectly blends maximalism, bold colors and couture shapes. Of course, Quinn’s flower prints — part of his design DNA — were not left behind.

wim wenders

two or three things i know about edward hopper
As part of their spring exhibition Edward Hopper, which focuses on the iconic representations of the infinite expanse of American landscapes and cityscapes of one of the 20th century’s most important American painters, the Fondation Beyeler in Basel will show Wim Wenders’ new 3D film installation.
Organized by the Fondation Beyeler in cooperation with the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the major repository of Hopper’s work.

MARIANNE FAITHFULL

THERE IS A GHOST
BOB WILSON

Os retratos em vídeo tomaram forma em 2007, após mais de dois anos de trabalho de Wilson com a VOOM HD Networks […] Eles são repetidos em rotação contínua para não ter um começo e um fim, criando uma obra de arte em quadros. O resultado final no monitor é semelhante ao de uma fotografia. Os “retratos”, que duram de 30 segundos a 20 minutos, parecem imóveis, mas os personagens realmente realizam pequenas ações – um movimento simples, um piscar de olhos, um toque no pé – que ampliam o potencial narrativo do retrato tradicional, aproximando-o da história cinematográfica, sem perder a aura de fixidez icônica que caracteriza o retrato pictórico de todos os tempos.