Alex Verhaest

À la folie/To Insanity

Gregor and Grete don’t understand one another anymore. Their common language, which used to be based on love, has disappeared. She accuses him of becoming a sickening crustacean, while he says she’s degenerated into some kind of mollusc. Through a failing memory and ever-changing versions of the same story, the viewer and characters become embroiled in a false history.

Sabrina Ratté

FLORALIA I
Inspired by the writings of Donna J. Haraway, Ursula K. Le Guin, and Greg Egan, the work plunges us into a speculative future, where samples of then extinct plant species are preserved and displayed in a virtual archive room. Through editing and visual strategies, this archive room is sporadically transformed under the effect of interference caused by the memory emanating from the listed plants, revealing traces of a past that continues to haunt the place. Floralia is a simulation of ecosystems born from the fusion of technology and organic matter, where past and future coexist in a perpetual tension of the present.

Noriyuki Suzuki

*(asterisk)
“*(asterisk) is an installation comprised of an armillary sphere apparatus rotating an apple in 360 degrees and four cameras omnidirectionally scanning the surface of the apple in real-time. Computers calculate the similarity between fragmentary images of the present apple and apples I’ve eaten before, as if they were my memory of apples. The computations and compared apple-fragment images are shown on four displays respectively.” Noriyuki Suzuki

SHIRO TAKATANI

高谷史郎
史郎の高谷
La chambre claire
La Chambre Claire (or Camera Lucida) is a show built up from precise, symmetrical movements, inviting spectators to embark on a thought-provoking journey into their most intimate and personal territory. In this, his first solo work as creative artist and director, Shiro Takatani pays homage to the French writer Roland Barthes and his essay on photography, La chambre claire (1980). The result is a performance that blends theatre, the art of movement and installation to compose a great fresco full of subtle, elegant minimalist images that advance towards an aesthetic climax. Reflecting on photography and memory, the production invites us to embark upon an intimate, solitary journey to look inside ourselves and formulate a personal interpretation of what we see.
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La Chambre Claire (oder Camera Lucida) ist eine Show, die aus präzisen, symmetrischen Bewegungen aufgebaut ist und die Zuschauer zu einer zum Nachdenken anregenden Reise in ihr intimstes und persönlichstes Gebiet einlädt. In seiner ersten Soloarbeit als kreativer Künstler und Regisseur huldigt Shiro Takatani dem französischen Schriftsteller Roland Barthes und seinem Aufsatz über Fotografie, La chambre claire (1980). Das Ergebnis ist eine Performance, die Theater, Bewegungskunst und Installation miteinander verbindet, um ein großartiges Fresko voller subtiler, eleganter minimalistischer Bilder zu komponieren, die sich einem ästhetischen Höhepunkt nähern. Die Produktion reflektiert Fotografie und Erinnerung und lädt uns ein, eine intime, einsame Reise zu unternehmen, um in uns selbst zu schauen und eine persönliche Interpretation dessen zu formulieren, was wir sehen.
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La Chambre Claire(またはCamera Lucida)は、正確で対称的な動きから構築されたショーであり、観客を招待して、最も親密で個人的な領域への示唆に富む旅に出ます。この中で、クリエイティブアーティスト兼ディレクターとしての彼の最初のソロ作品である高谷史郎は、フランスの作家ロラン・バルトと彼の写真に関するエッセイ、ラ・シャンブル・クレア(1980)に敬意を表しています。その結果、劇場、動きの芸術、インスタレーションを融合させて、美的クライマックスに向けて前進する繊細でエレガントなミニマリストのイメージに満ちた素晴らしいフレスコ画を構成するパフォーマンスが生まれました。写真と記憶を反映して、この作品は私たちを親密で孤独な旅に乗り出し、自分自身の内部を見て、私たちが見ているものの個人的な解釈を定式化するように誘います。

 

Frederik Heyman

CEREMONIAL FORMALITY
Frederik Heyman’s work is a balancing act incorporating multiple media – including video, installations and photogaphy – often in a digitally altered environment. In his work, Heyman explores memory and duration, using photogrammetry and 3D scanning to depict and represent the passage of time. The hallmarks of Heyman’s work are mechanical and technological: wires, wheels, scrolling LED marquees, metal frames, clamps, industrial lights, screens and cameras. Bodies–as opposed to humans–are subject to unusual dynamics with these technological trappings. In Ceremonial Formality (2020) a contortionist is encased in a metal cage while a spectator, hooked up to wires, looks on.

CHRISTIAN BOLTANSKI

基督教波尔坦斯基
בולטנסקי
クリスチャン·ボルタンスキー
Кристиан Болтански

Homage

R.I.P 1944-2021

Preoccupied with collective memory, mortality, and the passage of time, Christian Boltanski creates paintings, sculptures, films, and mixed-media installations that approach these themes in a range of styles, symbolic to direct. Boltanski often makes metaphorical use of found objects, as in No Man’s Land (2010), an enormous pile of discarded jackets set to the soundtrack of thousands of human heartbeats, suggesting the anonymity, randomness, and inevitability of death. In Monuments (1985), electrical bulbs cast a seemingly bittersweet light on pictures of child holocaust victims. Describing his interest in personal histories, Boltanski has said, “What drives me as an artist is that I think everyone is unique, yet everyone disappears so quickly. […] We hate to see the dead, yet we love them, we appreciate them.”

DOUG AITKEN

ダグエイケン
道格·艾特肯
new horizon
Doug Aitken was born in California in 1968. He lives and works in Los Angeles and New York. Widely known for his innovative fine art installations, Doug Aitken is at the forefront of 21st century communication. Utilizing a wide array of media and artistic approaches, his eye leads us into a world where time, space, and memory are fluid concepts.

FILEALIVE

FILEALIVE/ARQUIVOVIVO
online meetings
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The FILEALIVE / ARQUIVOVIVO online meetings, to be held on March 29, 30 and 31, 2021, will include professionals and researchers dedicated to the areas of digital memory, cultural heritage preservation and information technology, present in six round tables, presenting case studies, examples of archives and conservation strategies for organizations that aim the free dissemination and protection of art and technology collections.

ANDY LOMAS

Morphogenetic Creations
Created by a mathematician, digital artist and Emmy award winning supervisor of computer generated effects – Andy Lomas, Morphogenetic Creations is a collection of works that explore the nature of complex forms that can be produced by digital simulation of growth systems. These pieces start with a simple initial form which is incrementally developed over time by adding iterative layers of complexity to the structure.The aim is to create structures emergently: exploring generic similarities between many different forms in nature rather than recreating any particular organism. In the process he is exploring universal archetypal forms that can come from growth processes rather than top-down externally engineered design.Programmed using C++ with CUDA, the series use a system of growth by deposition: small particles of matter are repeatedly deposited onto a growing structure to build incrementally over time. Rules are used to determine how new particles are created, and how they move before being deposited. Small changes to these rules can have dramatic effects on the final structure, in effect changing the environment in which the form is grown. To create these works, Andy uses the GPU as a compute device rather than as a display device. All the data is held in memory on the GPU and various kernel functions are called to do things like apply forces to the cells, make cells split, and to render the cells using ray-tracing. The simulations and rendering for each of the different animated structures within this piece take about 12 hours to run, Andy explains. By the end of the simulations there are over 50,000,000 cells in each structure.The Cellular Forms use a more biological model, representing a simplified system of cellular growth. Structures are created out of interconnected cells, with rules for the forces between cells, as well as rules for how cells accumulate internal nutrients. When the nutrient level in a cell exceeds a given threshold the cell splits into two, with both the parent and daughter cells reconnecting to their immediate neighbours. Many different complex organic structures are seen to arise from subtle variations on these rules, creating forms with strong reminiscences of plants, corals, internal organs and micro-organisms.

PHILLIP STEARNS

Memoria frammentata
Phillip Stearns utilizza in modo creativo tutte le forme di elettronica nel suo lavoro, spesso mescolando luce e suono con tecniche tradizionali come la tessitura. Un aspetto del suo lavoro è la trasformazione della glitch art in disegni intrecciati attraverso il suo marchio tessile concettuale Glitch Textiles, fondato nel 2011. Questo spazia dalla visualizzazione di dati binari grezzi delle applicazioni alla scrittura di algoritmi personalizzati per generare modelli che possono essere trasformati in tattili e funzionali opere d’arte. Un’altra impresa è il trittico Fragmented Memory di grandi arazzi tessuti completato nel maggio 2013 al TextielMuseum di Tilburg, nei Paesi Bassi. Questo progetto ha utilizzato pratiche e processi digitali per sfumare i confini tra fotografia, visualizzazione dei dati, design tessile e informatica.

LIN HWAI-MIN

White Water and Dust
White Water and Dust, a rare double bill by the internationally renowned choreographer Lin Hwai-min, brings great intensity of contrast between the two works. While White Water, set to piano music by Erik Satie, flows like a movable celebration of life, Dust, to a powerful rendering of Shostakovich’s String Quartet No. 8, evokes a memory of Goya’s Black Paintings.

Hugo Arcier

Ghost City
The installation Ghost City is built around a reinterpretation of the set of the famous game GTA V. The spectator is plunged into an environment without any population that disappears as we move closer. It is a meditative and captivating experience. The focus is put on architectural and graphic elements. This virtual universe solicits both the present (the experience of the artwork) and the memory. The disappearance, before our eyes, of this virtual universe feeds the terror that one day all our digital life – ephemeral cloud.

Broersen & Lukács

Point Cloud Old Growth
Forest on Location
In the video work Forest on Location, we see the avatar of the Iranian opera singer Shahram Yazdani walking through a forest. One moment, the forest wraps around him protectively, the next moment the trees crumble away into loose pieces of bark, or melt into a static green mass. At the same time, the forest as a whole floats around in darkness, uprooted. It is a forest without a location, except on our screen. The young man’s avatar appears to be wandering around there aimlessly. It is a wonderland that he exits from towards the end of the video, when his body slips straight through the green wall. This finally breaks the spell of the illusory forest, and everything is revealed to be no more than staged decor. But the forest does exist as a real forest, somewhere. This virtual green world is a digital back-up of Bia?owie?a Forest: the last remaining stretch of primeval low land forest that once covered much of Central Europe. Inspired by what the historian Simon Schama wrote about Bia?owie?a in Landscape and Memory (1995), Persijn Broersen and Margit Lukács journeyed to Poland to capture the forest suffused by old-Germanic nostalgia and mythical atmosphere.

Ief Spincemaille

Reverse Blinking
Imagine that your head is captured inside a photo camera. It is completely dark. Only when the shutter opens en closes, you see the world in a flash. The shutter moves so fast that nothing has time to move. Everything where you point your gaze at, becomes like a photograph. A memory. Something that has been, but isn’t anymore. You see people as frozen figures, whole streets as untouched moments. Life as a sort of dia show. “Reverse Blinking” creates this experience. It is a completely closed helmet with two shutters in front of the eyes. They are controllable by the user. Reverse Blinking works on batteries and can be freely used in or outside the museum. It is best used where there is a lot of movement and people. “Reverse Blinking” is part of a series of art works, through which the artist tries to add video and photographical effects to our natural way of seeing.

Vanessa Beecroft

瓦妮莎比克罗夫特
נסה יקרופט
ヴァネッサ·ビークロフト
바네사 비크로프트
ВАНЕССА БИКРОФТ
La Membre Fantôme

For the installation ‘le membre fantôme’, vanessa beecroft takes the visitor back to the classical language of sculpture through a conceptual perspective, leading us towards an intimate gallery room inhabited by timeless statuary. shown at the 2015 venice biennale, beecroft presents a scene that is visible only at a distance, where the viewer must look through a crevice carved out of two marble walls. Through the panels, we see fragments of a stone garden, rich in archaeological allures and echoes of early twentieth century avant-garde. the archive of memory is here a tribute in bronze – placed at the centre of the installation – to marcel duchamp’s ‘étant donnés’, a reference model for her research that combines personal memories, historical and artistic impressions and a conceptual tension.

Ka Fai Choy

Synchrometrics

Can we design future memories for the body?
Is the body itself the apparatus for remembering cultural processes?Prospectus For a Future Body proposes new perspectives on how the body remembers and invents technological narratives. Central to the project is the study of body movement in dance: How it can evolve, adapt or re-condition to possible futures?Eternal Summer Storm explores the concept of muscle memory transfer as an alternative form of interactive cultural continuities. This concept prototype speculates on a future digital library of body movements or dance techniques that can be experienced beyond the audio-visual conventions. Eternal Summer Storm attempts to recreate legendary Japanese dancer Tatsumi Hijikata’s Butoh dance choreography and experience in ‘A Summer Storm’ (1973) from archival footages.Bionic Movement Research is a collection of experiments on the process of designing digital muscle memory for the body. Inspired by Luigi Galvani discovery (1780) of animal electricity in the human body, these experiments appropriate the techniques of electrical nerve stimulation to choreograph artificial muscle contraction and body movement.

Ani Liu

Untitled: (A Search for Ghosts in the Meat Machine)
What does it mean to be human? At first glance a simple question, the idea of being human is an unstable construct, continuously recrafted. Recent technological innovations allow us to redesign ourselves profoundly— from networked prosthetics and artificial intelligence, to the genetic code of life itself. Can our behaviors be reduced to algorithms? Can our bodies be upgraded with nonorganic integrations? Can sentience itself by manufactured in a lab? This set of nine sculptures examines personhood from anatomical, psychological, genetic, biochemical, behavioral, algorithmic, personal narrative and memory. In many ways, this installation is an emotional confrontation with being quantifiable.

JULIAN OLIVER

朱利安·奥利弗
줄리안 올리버
ג’וליאן אוליבר
ジュリアン・オリバー
Джулиан Оливер
Levelhead

LevelHead is a spatial memory game. The game takes its inspiration from the “Philosphical Toys” of 18th/19th century Europe and the memory systems (“memory loci”) of the ancient Greeks. levelHead uses a hand-held solid-plastic cube as its only interface. On-screen it appears that each face of the cube contains a little room, each of which are logically connected by doors. In one of these rooms is a character. By tilting the cube, the player directs this character from room to room in an effort to find the exit. Some doors lead nowhere and will send the character back to the room they started in, a trick designed to challenge the player’s spatial memory. Which doors belong to which rooms? There are three cubes (levels) in all, each of them connected by a single door. Players have as a goal to move the character from room to room, cube to cube, in an attempt to find the final exit door of all three cubes. If this door is found, the character will appear to leave the cube, walk across the table surface and vanish. Then the game starts over.

FILE FESTIVAL

Helene Nymann

MOL
MOL (2018) takes up the ancient technique of memorizing information by placing symbols and signs along a mental path through an imagined house from room to room. Interested in the way technology affects both our sense of and need for memory, Nymann attempts to capture her own active and associative thinking by reconstructing her path through her abandoned childhood home. In the work, she visualizes her past experiences through the placement of anchor objects—which, according to the ancient Greco-Roman method of loci, shape the way we perceive the external world—suggesting that in our increasing reliance on technology to memorize for us, we allow others to form our view of the world.

Arcangelo Sassolino

Damnatio Memoriae

From the Latin, damnatio memoriae describes an act of erasure from the historical record reserved for
those who have brought dishonor to the Roman State. Employed as the most stringent punishment for
treason, damnatio memoriae physically razes all traces of an individual from society, typically through
the destruction a statue’s physiognomy or the abrasion of inscribed monuments. Throughout the past
two decades, Sassolino has developed a body of work that examines the relationship between industrial
machines and humanist impulses where viewers are meant to question how an sculpture’s kinetic
function aesthetically and conceptually allegorizes human experiences and cultural conditions.

REJANE CANTONI & LEONARDO CRESCENTI

FALA
File Festival
It is an autonomous and interactive talking machine, designed to establish automatic communication and synchronization between humans and machines, and between machines and machines. At installation, a microphone interfaces with a “chorus” of forty cell phones. All devices are in a listening state to capture voices and other sounds The autonomous talking machine analyzes the information and establishes equivalence with its memory. If so, the machine generates an audiovisual result with a semantic meaning similar to the sound captured, that is, it speaks and displays on the screens a word identical or similar to the word heard. Speakers and visualization of words on the screens of cell phones allow a “dialogue”, and for humans, to listen and see the machine conversation.

DAVID SZAUDER AKA PIXEL NOIZZ

failed memories, the 4th selection
doras flame

“In these images I apply the notion or phenomenon of „ lack of time”. When I started to develop the ‘Failed memories’ series, my intention was to examine and involve the notion of time as a factor into my images. To put it more simple, to visualise the factor and importance of time in the mechanisms of the memory, as without time there is no memory.”

JEFFREY SHAW

Disappearance

In this work the movement of a large video monitor mounted on an industrial fork-lift truck creates a virtual representation of a larger than life size ballerina. As the forklift moves the monitor up and down the ballerina is presented from head to toe, and as the forklift truck rotates the ballerina also appears to turn. In this way the monitor functions as a window that gradually reveals the virtual presence of the ballerina who is dancing in the same axis as the rotating forklift truck. Also visible inside the motor compartment of the forklift truck is a small rotating ballerina figurine in front of which a video camera moves up and down. This mechanism is electronically synchronised with the movement of the forklift itself and provides the closed circuit source for the video image of the ballerina that is seen on the monitor screen. Disappearance evokes and celebrates the memory of the ballerina on a music box (a first generation robot) and generates her virtual reconstruction to the extent that the machinery of reproduction itself now incarnates her pirouettes.
video

PHILLIP STEARNS

فيليب ستيرنز
Fragmented Memory

As electronic media (digital or analog), images, video, and sound become reduced to signal—a manifestation of some order defined within a certain system—Light and Sound themselves become raw materials for reconstituting electronic signals back into physiological experience.

VIVIAN BEER

I employ visual cues culled from mass culture, excerpt processes from industry and patterns from the decorative arts to create handmade, one-off objects that manifest the nostalgia of history, the speed of progress and the memory of the human hand.

Angelica Mesiti

Assembly
‘In ASSEMBLY, I explore the space where communication moves from verbal and written forms to non-verbal, gestural and musical forms. The latter creates a sort of code upon which meaning, memory and imagination can be overlaid.’

NIKKI PRESSLEY

Drawers
Nikki Pressley’s work is concerned with examining and disrupting the narratives associated with personal and collective history, language, belief and memory. She is interested in interpretations of time and space that are malleable and destabilising in relation to humanity and self. The work consists of drawings, sculpture, projection, design and organic materials that function as contemplations on these various ideas, often creating broad relationships from project to project.

ANTONY GORMLEY

Энтони Гормли
أنتوني غورملي
葛姆雷
アントニー·ゴームリー
Another Place (100 cast iron figurative sculptures)
Antony Gormley has over the past 30 years revitalised the human form in sculpture through a radical investigation of the body as a place of memory and transformation. “I am interested in the body”, he says, “because it is the place where emotions are most directly registered. When you feel frightened, when you feel excited, happy, depressed somehow the body registers it.”

Fritz Panzer

Фриц Панзер
In the 70s Fritz Panzer has started creating sculptures that were replicas of furniture and objects on a scale of one to one. His work offers an interesting experience that asks the viewer to rely on their own memory and recognition to complete the works, referring to outline drawings and to gestural drawings creating the volume of an object through his total silhouette. New spaces come into being, in which the artist makes an escalator, stepladder or desk grow out of the world and likewise into it, holding them poised between visibility and invisibility.

Keith Lemley

Keith Lemley is a sculpture artist whose work focuses on creating an informative relationship between object and space and challenges the physicality of material presence. Many of his works are made up of opposing forces of ephemeral light and structural woodblocks that unite in a metaphorical existence of natural systems. His background in science and engineering is reflected in the unique synthesizing of media that portray scenes from nature and memory and inspire a sense of exploration for the viewer.

Matthias Dörfelt

Selective Memory Theatre
Selective Memory Theatre is a machine-like perception and memory installation, that thematises the desire to teach the non-forgetting digital memory to forget. It thereby covers the selectionistic nature of the individual mind, that marks the human sensing and remembering as the subjective and biased – but therefore human and functional – act that it is. The installation consists of two projections, the perception and the memory layer. Both will be explained in what follows.

Yin Xiuzhen

Инь Сючжэн
尹秀珍
Nowhere to Land

Her artworks have since been shown extensively in various international exhibitions. Best known for her works that incorporate second-hand objects, Yin uses her artwork to explore modern issues of globalization and homogenization. By utilizing recycled materials such as sculptural documents of memory, she seeks to personalize objects and allude to the lives of specific individuals, which are often neglected in the drive toward excessive urbanization, rapid modern development and the growing global economy.

Ivan Navarro

Reality Show
The artist is known for the union between the neon and fluorescent and socio-political messages. His minimalist and modern sculptures and installations are guided by sharp social and political criticism, which has its origin in the artist personal history – that was born amid the military dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet, in Santiago, in the 1970s. The dictator used to adopt, among other absurd practices, power cut as a way to impose curfews on people. A light to control the masses is a memory of Iván Navarro childhood and eventually became the major subject of his work.

Hera Buyuktasciyan

Hera Buyuktasciyan is a Greek-Armenian rooted artist living and working in Istanbul . As a concept she works generally on anything considered as ”The Other” . ”The Other” includes ; identity , belonging, xenophobia , socio-cultural and self memory . She uses metaphors from iconographic elements , stories , quotes and self narratives.

Jeremiah Barber

Other Half Orbit
The installation consists of a large reflecting pool with built-in topographies to hold our bodies horizontally at exactly half-submersion. The images of our bodies become completed by reflection, and a secondary reflection of our shadows is cast on the wall. In the performance, we host an unscripted conversation about Ingrid’s memory loss, dreams, identity, and the possibility that we may never know one another fully.

MONA VATAMANU & FLORIN TUDOR

Widely shown in Europe, Vatamanu and Tudor’s artistic practice involves bringing history into the present tense, whether in the form of performative re-enactment or symbolic recuperation. A deep interest in architecture as a repository of both personal and collective memory and as a mark of communist power underlies many of their projects

Dinh Q. Lê

Memory for Tomorrow
Vietnamese American artist Dinh Q. Lê is known for his work in photography, video, and installation. He often splices, interweaves, and distorts photographs to explore his own relationship to Vietnam’s complicated cultural and political history. Lê’s family left Vietnam when he was 10; he has returned and now lives in Ho Chi Minh City (formerly Saigon).

chiharu shiota

تشيهارو شيوتا
千春盐田
צ’ילהארו יוטה
치하루 시오타
塩田千春
ТИХАРУ СИОТА
the key in the hand

The installation seeks to explore the notion of memory, using tens of thousands of keys collected from people across the globe in its realization. “Keys are familiar and very valuable things that protect important people and spaces in our lives. They also inspire us to open the door to unknown worlds” shiota explains.

WILMA HURSKAINEN

Fog
Talk about blending into the background. Photographer Wilma Hurskainen and her sister wear clothes that perfectly match their natural surroundings. Whereas we’ve seen this style done before, never have we seen it done so naturally, almost as if it was all done by accident.They’re part of the larger series called No Name which deals with childhood and memory.“Invisible, was an idea that I once got while looking at snow and a forest line,” she tells us. “We have a lot of that in Finland! Even as a child I was very interested in the idea of hiding or mimicking an animal.” The woman in Invisible is actually one of her sisters.

Ricardo Barreto and Maria Hsu Rocha

Martela
FILE FESTIVAL
Tactila is an art form whose medium is the sense of touch (tact) which is independent from the all the other ones and has its own intelligence, imagination, memory, perception, and sensation. It is well known that vision and sound have hegemony in arts and in other disciplines. Tactila takes place in time and, therefore, can be recorded and have various forms of notation for subsequent executions. That is why its development became possible only now, thanks to mechatronic and robotic systems which are compatible with machine languages.
The creation of tactile works involves a (tact) composition, which can be made through handmade notation and played on a keyboard or directly on the computer of the tactile machine ( robot ).
Tactile machines can present numerous tactile possibilities through points, vectors, and textures with varying rhythms and intensities, and be run in different extensions and locations of our body.

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The first tactile machine is called “Martela”. It is a tactile robot comprised of 27 engines subdivided into three squares (3 x 3), i.e., each square has 9 engines. Each engine corresponds to a matrix point, so we have 27 tactile units that allow to touch the user’s body with various intensities.

Ralf Baecker

Random Access Memory

FIONA TAN

פיונה טאן
フィオナ·タン
Фиона Тан
فيونا تان
Rise and Fall
Fiona Tan explores storytelling, memory, and the part they play in the formation of identity throughout this exhibition of five video installations, various associated sketches and one single-channel video. Rise and Fall (2009), elongated projections onto two large, side-by-side screens, is a wordless meditation, set to music, of a woman no longer young but still conscious of her looks; she was clearly a beauty in her youth. As the video proceeds we gather that the young woman pictured on the second screen is the memory of her younger self. They often move through domestic activities (sleeping, bathing, dressing) in parallel; this is inter-cut with scenes of violently rushing water (shot at Niagra Falls, it turns out). It’s a hackneyed metaphor – the water’s endless surging as an image of time’s relentless uni-directionality – but in Tan’s hands that doesn’t seem to matter; she creates extraordinarily emotional work out of simple stories and well-worn themes.

Mike Nelson

To the Memory of H.P. Lovecraft

DIMITRIS PAPAIOANNOU

ΔΗΜΉΤΡΗΣ ΠΑΠΑΪΩΆΝΝΟΥ
ДИМИТРИСОМ ПАПАИОАННУ
NOWHERE
This central scene is dedicated to the memory of PINA BAUSCH

NOWHERE explores the nature of the theatrical stage itself, a spatial mechanism continually transformed and redefined by the human presence to denote any place, and yet designed to be a non-place. 26 performers measure and mark out the space using their bodies, pitting themselves against its dimensions and technical capabilities in a site-specific performance that can be presented nowhere else.

TAE GON KIM

تاي غون كيم
Robes de mémoire

Amant imaginaire
L’œuvre éthérée de Tae Gon Kim, Dresses of Memory, façonne des centaines de brins de fibre optique sous la forme de quatre robes magnifiques et extravagantes. Suspendues dans l’obscurité, les robes apparaissent comme des apparitions, scintillantes des royaumes de la fantaisie. Lentement, la fibre optique illuminée de chaque robe change de couleur, symbolisant son histoire et sa transformation au fil du temps.En créant l’œuvre, l’artiste s’est inspirée de l’écriture du théoricien et philosophe littéraire français Roland Barthes. Dans sa publication de 1978 A Lover’s Discourse: Fragments, Barthes écrivait: «Je veux être un, je veux que ce soit comme si nous étions unis, enfermés dans le même sac de peau, les vêtements étant l’enveloppe lisse du matériau fusionnant qui est en fait mon amant imaginaire.
Tae Gon Kim a interprété ce texte en créant des œuvres qui reflètent également sa propre fascination pour les relations et l’amour. Il veut que les robes amènent le spectateur à imaginer «que nous devenons les gens que nous aimons». En projetant des images sur les robes, il invite le spectateur à l’intérieur, «comme si nous portions nos désirs». Les différentes images racontent également l’histoire et en constante évolution de chaque robe.

BYOUNGHO KIM

Бйонхо Киму
A Memory of the Rule

Refik Anadol, Kilroy Realty Corporation and SOM Architects

Virtual Depictions
Parametric data sculptures
The main idea of ‘Virtual Depictions:San Francisco’ is to bring 21st century approach to public art to define new poetics of space through media arts and architecture and to create a unique parametric data sculptures that has an intelligence, memory and culture. Through architectural transformations of media wall located in 350 Mission’ lobby, home of Salesforce, main motivation with this seminal media architecture approach is to frame this experience with a meticulously abstract and cinematic site-specific data-driven narration. As a result, this media wall turns into a spectacular public event making direct and phantasmagorical connections to its surroundings through simultaneous juxtapositions. The project also intends to contribute to contemporary discourse of public art by proposing a hybrid blend of media arts and architecture in 21st century.

USMAN HAQUE & NATALIE JEREMIJENKO

ウスマン·ハック
Flightpath

“Flightpath Toronto’s swarms of flying people experiment with an urban-scale participatory proposition: one that demonstrates the pleasures of emissionless urban mobility and creates a shared memory of a possible future. Flightpath Toronto is a collaboration between Usman Haque, architect/artist and Natalie Jeremijenko, engineer/artist, uniting his expertise in participatory urban spectacle with her expertise in bird flight and urban natural systems.”A panoramic 4-loop animation showed imaginative 3D-generated city featured some art projects by Usman Haque and Natalie Jeremijenko from a “flyer” ‘s point of view. Images of the art projects gradually appeared in each loop.

Florence To and Ricardo Donoso

quintesence (QTSNSE)
Visualising a process of elements that represent the development of the psychic process, symbols will represent elements of the subconscious, telling a story of how memory may be disorientated, distorted, dysfunctional yet acting as a linear process to individuation. Using contemporary classical composition techniques & elements of sound system culture to heighten the viewers engagement with the different dimensions of space being presented and to enhance their depth of perception.

Chaya Czernowin

MAIM | The Memory of Water

Jeff Carter

Construction N
Often occupying both physical and temporal space, my sculpture has always incorporated both conventional and experimental media, including woodcarving, metalworking, installation, kinetics, microelectronics and video. While it tends to be visually diverse, the friction between object and memory has been at the conceptual core of my sculptural practice since 1994. The images, objects and narratives of a particular place or experience undergo distortions each time they are represented, and it is these forms of abstraction I explore in my sculpture.
Earlier bodies of work have utilized the physical residue of my traveling – the souvenirs, postcards, snapshots and videotapes – as central elements of the sculpture, forcing them to reveal their own inadequacy, disengagement or transformation, to subvert the nostalgic ideal, or to disrupt the usual implications of value and validation in a cultural artifact. In later works I utilize the physicality of scale, motion, and orientation to extend and challenge the conventional representation of landscape. These pieces define specific places as indefinite spatial constructs that complicate the certainty of “being there,” and are part of a larger attempt to relate a fragmented travel narrative through architecture, landscapes and souvenirs.
I have been using IKEA products as raw material for several years, and continue to be interested in extracting conceptual value from it. I am currently exploring the relationship between the Modern avant-garde and contemporary consumer design culture. In my recent work, I attempt to articulate various points of connection and rupture between IKEA and the Bauhaus by constructing scale models of demolished or unrealized buildings by Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius using “hacked” IKEA products such as tables, bookshelves and flooring.

TROIKA

hardcoded memory

Kozo Nishino

كوزو نيشينو
Memory of the Sky

elisabeth wierzbicka

Crown Of Thorns

Elisabeth Wierzbicka painter and sculptor, was born in Cracow in 1964. She studied at the Cracow Academy of Fine Art from 1984-1989. In 1989 she continued her training at the Ecole Superiore of Fine Art in Paris and started her career as an international artist in several countries.She works with memory and identity, erasing and dividing time, nature and coexistence.
The ability of the artist is to transform and transcend reality apparently common and banal, in a powerful and evocative potential for stimulating the imagination.

Bill Durgin

Memory Black

AYA HAIDAR

Stitching The Stories We Dare To Tell
My investigation of the limitations of a visual language within fine art leads me to explore the fundamental elements of language that contribute to a story. This overlap plays on one’s senses of memory and imagination. I place myself at the centre of the work, both physically as the object and emotionally as the subject.

CHRISTINA DIMITRIADIS

Oblivions Exercises
“Dimitriadis examined the “remember to forget” principle in the front of the mirror turned back to the viewer. According to Freud, memory-traces have nothing to do with the fact of becoming conscious, “indeed they are often most powerful and most enduring when the process which left them behind was one which never entered consciousness””Barbara Piwowarska

DAVID SZAUDER AKA PIXEL NOIZZ

Failed memory – Story of Mr Wolf
via highlike submit

ALEXANDRA DEMENTIEVA

Drama House
File Festival
“Drama house” is a house when the simple ring at the doorbell can have unpredictable consequences; event, one is stranger then another and in the same time all, what happens with habitants belongs to everyday life. Sometimes these circumstances are a little bit exaggerated. Spectator stands in front of low fence with a door-gate. There are 8 doorbells on it. The act of ringing provokes an action in an apartment window. Based on chance and the choices that viewers make, the project explores the contemporary trends in the construction of a narrative and the interplay between diverse informative sub-layers effected through the impact of digital, non-linear media. It also questions the very process of story telling and at the same time considers the way of audience reading. It investigates the differences of individual and collective perception. In other words, the sequence and choices that each viewer selects reflect his own perspectives and behavioral patterns, thus makes the viewer much more than an active participant. By interacting with the installation the viewer is engaged in the creative process: re-telling the ever-changing story through the utilization of the primary capability of the digitization: reshaping the information. Therefore, each participant walks away with a unique, slightly different vision, each shaped according to his own choices and directions. Interactive media and the digital environment of the DH and its narrative function through a recognizable metaphor that makes access to the information meaningful: a house as a conceptual society model and an apartment as a private space. This reference transforms the objects and stories in the project into the metaphors and reminds us of the art cultural function: as a site of memory of the social collective imagination and as a site of representation and power.

JERRY UELSMANN

ジェリー・ユルズマン
杰里尤斯曼
Home Is A Memory