David Bowen

PLANT BOT
plant bot is a time based interactive art installation where the fates of a living plant and a computer are interdependent. Essentially the plant attempts to train a computer using image recognition. Through this process the computer will learn to recognize when the plant needs water based on images it takes of the plant. If the plant appears healthy, the computer will maintain a regular water regiment. If the plant does not appear healthy to the computer it will attempt to aid the plant by adjusting to what it “thinks” the plant needs based on the images gathered. As the computer becomes more intelligent and hence more adept at caring for the plant, the plant will conceivably thrive and grow in proportion. If the computer is unsuccessful, conceivably the opposite will occur.

Glenn Branca

Lesson Nº 1 + The Ascension
Glenn Branca has always been a musician positioned halfway between the role of avant-garde composer and that of a rock musician. A pupil and disciple of the masters of American minimalism such as La Monte Young, Terry Riley, Philip Glass and Steve Reich, he has always had to fight against prejudice and fierce criticism. His position was certainly uncomfortable, too academic for rock fans and too “politically incorrect” for academics. In fact, Branca was trying to unhinge all the limits imposed by the rigid schemes of the avant-garde, aware of the fact that those who want to be truly avant-garde should have no limits. John Cage was also able to criticize him, even calling him a fascist ( Luciano Berio also did so for all minimalists) for the excessive rigidity of his compositions, even though he recognized his innovative power. After having created his best known album, The Ascension (1981), a true monument of maximalism played with a classical rock formation (guitars, bass and drums), he tries to approach a different format, the Symphony, as always halfway between rock and academia. Branca will like the experiment and will re-propose it several times in the following decades, to date there are sixteen symphonies (not all recordings are available). Here is how young Branca’s ensemble appeared to the American composer John Adams in one of his first live performances of the First Symphony: “Branca’s event that I listened to at the Japan Center Theater in San Francisco in 1981 was one of his symphonies for guitar . The group didn’t look very different from thousands of other independent or alternative rock bands of the time: guys in jeans and worn t-shirts busy with cables while maintaining that typical distracted expression of rock musicians.

 

SUPERFLEX

Vertical Migration
Unsettling our perceptions of scale and otherness, Vertical Migration is an intimate encounter with a life form that bears no resemblance to human beings, though we share a planet, an ecosystem, and a future. Because of sea-level rise, humans will also be migrating vertically in the coming centuries, to higher elevations and raised buildings. The siphonophore’s story is our story. Though we can never experience its journey through the pitch-black ocean depths, we can shift our perspective to recognize that we’re connected, that our actions affect each other, and that we share a common fate.

Shinseungback Kimyonghun

Cloud Face
Humans see figures in clouds: animals, faces and even god. This kind of perception also appears in machine vision. Face-detection algorithms sometimes find faces where there are not any.’Cloud Face’ is a collection of cloud images that are recognized as human faces by a face-detection algorithm. It is a result of machine vision’s error but they often look like faces to human eyes too. Humans, yet, know these are not actual faces. Humans rather imagine faces from the clouds. Here, the error of machines and the imagination of humans meet.

Peppercorn

Upload not complete
The work magnifies the process of virtual and real fusion, which is the process of uploading human consciousness to digital space. When the visual perception has been lost, can people still recognize the body through the touch and sound of wind, sound and vibration everywhere? Experiencers use non-visual senses, experience media art, and cooperate with the Taiwanese Non-Visual Aesthetic Education Association to create a digital space where the computer can fully understand the location of the experiencer in the space, allowing the experiencer to listen, move, touch objects, feel the vibration and come to know the space.

Max Cooper

Morphosis
Morphosis uses artificial neural networks to create morphing images of scale. The system explores how natural structures from the most tiny to the most huge, share aesthetic properties, as recognized by the trained network, and recreated in continuous flowing sequence via these connections. It’s a study of the seemingly infinite nature of space and natural physical structure, which can loop back on itself to give endless visual exploration and variation.

Charles Lindsay

CARBON
CARBON merges the aesthetics of space exploration and scientific imaging with the interpretation of abstract symbols. I’m interested in extremophiles, the origins of life on earth, and what forms sentience might assume elsewhere in the universe. Would we recognize it hovering in front of us? What began with a camera-less method I discovered while experimenting with photograms, and drawing, has grown into immersive environments including large stills, video, multi-point sound and inter-active sculptures.

ANN HAMILTON

アン·ハミルトン
앤 해밀턴
the event of a thread

Ann Hamilton is a visual artist internationally recognized for the sensory surrounds of her large-scale multi-media installations. Using time as process and material, her methods of making serve as an invocation of place, of collective voice, of communities past and of labor present. Noted for a dense accumulation of materials, her ephemeral environments create immersive experiences that poetically respond to the architectural presence and social history of their sites.

NAZIHA MESTAOUI AND YACINE AIT KACI

NAZIHA MESTAOUI (1975 – april 29th,2020)
HOMAGE
R.I.P
Electronic Shadow
H2O
File Festival
Naziha Mestaoui, artist and architect, lives and works in Paris. She is pioneer in the art of the digital age, and recognized as inventor of realtime 3D Video Mapping, a patented technique at the crossroads of spatial and imagistic art.
She exhibits her artworks across the globe: MOMA in New York, Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, the Museum of Photography in Tokyo, the Contemporary Art Biennale in Sevilla, Sao Paulo’s SESI (File Festival), Shanghai’s MOCA

EMMA SULKOWICZ

DRØME
Emma Sulkowicz is a performance artist living and working in New York City, though most recognize her as the Columbia University student who made headlines her senior year in 2014

IRIS VAN HERPEN

Айрис Ван Эрпен
イリス ヴァン ヘルペン

Iris van Herpen is a Dutch fashion designer who is widely recognized as one of fashion’s most talented and forward-thinking creators who continuously pushes the boundaries of fashion design. Since her first show in 2007 van Herpen has been preoccupied with inventing new forms and methods of sartorial expression by combining the most traditional and the most radical materials and garment construction methods into her unique aesthetic vision.

NICK ERVINCK

Olnetop
OLNETOP has something monstrous, a hybrid shape in which one can recognize various elements. The work is not clearly defined but points in different directions. The imagery used is clearly inspired by macro photographic images of splashing water, and thus sculpturally interprets the encounter between nature and technology.

LORENZO DURANTINI

Tower no5 vhs tapes
It’s not hard to recognize that technology trends come and go, but what happens to all of those out of date products that the world no longer uses? Unfortunately a lot of the merchandise takes up landfill space, but there are a select few that step up to the recycling plate with ideas to repurpose the old products. Lorenzo Durantini’s creative vision for the large plastic rectangle VHS units we were all once googley eyed over, has taken to recreating them into powerful art sculptures.

James Seawright

Dome
James Seawright, born in 1936 in Jackson, Mississippi, was for many years Director of Visual Arts at Princeton University.
Recognized as one of the foremost technological artists since the late 1960’s, his works are in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum and the Guggenheim Museum of New York, the Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University, the New Jersey State Museum at Trenton, and other museums throughout the world.

Iwasaki Takahiro

貴宏岩崎
Такахиро Ивасаки
تاكاهيرو إيواساكي

Takahiro Iwasaki is recognized as one of Japan’s new generation of emerging young artists, who creates intricately detailed models that reinterpret contemporary cityscapes and iconic historic buildings. In recent years, his artworks have been featured in numerous international art fairs and major exhibitions, with sculptures from his reflection model series receiving the greatest attention. The reflection model series focuses on seven of Japan’s most sacred buildings that all have an intimate visual relationship with the reflections they cast in the water that surrounds them

GEOFFREY LILLEMON

Geoffrey Lillemon brings a classic romantic painting and drawing style to technology to reinterpret artistic practice. As one of the leading artists in digital practices, Lillemon has consistently foregrounded the interplay between the digital and physical world in his work, blending the traditional mediums with emerging technologies. This had lead to personal and commercial work which is recognized as contemporary art.

MAR CANET & CARLES GUTIERREZ

videomaton
File Festival

The initial idea was to engage audiences with the classical paintings. The installation tries to transform the classical portraits into memorable and playful experiences. In short, by looking into a mirror a face of participant is captured by the system. Next, the captured face travels into one of the classical portraits. Hence, the viewer is invited into the gallery in order to recognize him or herself in one of the paintings. In other words, the art piece replaces the original painted faces by the faces of the audience. To be more specific, the authors have created an original face-morphing that integrates itself into the well-know portraits, like Meninas by Goya. To put in a nutshell, the common experience of modern art is replaced by a novel, playful and enjoyable encounter. The installation creates a framework of expression where audience spontaneously and freely interact in front of a mirror knowing that they are recorded. The results are experience by all audience in the gallery. The project was produced in 2011 as a commission of interactive art project for the new City Council of Madrid curated by Chema Conesa. “Videomaton” was presented in the opening of new City Council of Madrid located in the Cibeles square. The installation was exhibited for a year in the institution. The aim of the exhibit was displaying the famous art pieces of Madrid museums in a novel way.

ANNE TYNG

Anatomy of Form
The Divine Proportion in the Platonic Solids

In fact, the Graham Foundation recognized Tyng’s talent nearly half a century ago in 1965, when she was awarded for her project Anatomy of Form: The Divine Proportion in the Platonic Solids:In her research she developed a theory of hierarchies of symmetry—symmetries within symmetries—and a search for architectural insight and revelation in the consistency and beauty of all underlying form.It’s fascinating stuff, and the images alone have piqued my interest in Tyng’s theories, which cover topics from Jungian cycles to the cosmos. Tyng (b. 1920 in Jiangxi, China) was one of the first women to earn a Masters in Architecture from Harvard. She spent nearly three decades collaborating with Louis Kahn before shifting her focus to research at the University of Pennsylvania in the late 60’s. The title of the exhibition and her works belie the understated beauty of their execution, which demonstrate the expressive power of order and geometry. Tyng’s unique command of form is matched by her raw intellect; thus, she elegantly articulates her vision in the models seen here.

PHILIP LÜSCHEN

Waiting Room Survival

A ‘Sneak in front tool’, ‘Incognito nose stand’ and ‘Waiting Room Survival Book. Philip Lüschen has designed these objects as part of his project on waiting rooms, Waiting Room Survival. The Incognito nose stand seduces us to wait incognito in waiting rooms in places where we would prefer not to be recognized, such as a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases. And if you want to be seen by a doctor as fast as possible, Philip Lüschen has got the answer: The sneak in front tool, with which you can make everyone else in the room disappear behind the empty waiting room chairs.‘’Although the objects were designed as practical implements, when not in use they function as icebreakers. They stimulate the imagination and break through the tension and passive dynamic of waiting.‘’ The objects displayed are the result of the many studies drawn in waiting rooms, which also served as the basis for the ‘Waiting Room Survival Book’. A guide with useful illustrated strategies on how to survive a waiting room visit.
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BILL VIOLA

比尔•维奥拉
빌 비올라
ביל ויולה
ビル·ヴィオラ
Билл Виола
The Lovers
Bill Viola is internationally recognized as one of todays leading artists. He has been instrumental in establishing video as a vital form of contemporary art, and in so doing has helped to greatly expand its scope in terms of technology, content, and historical reach.