PHILIP GLASS

فيليب الزجاج
菲利普·格拉斯
פיליפ גלאס
フィリップ·グラス
필립 글래스
Филип Гласс
Einstein On The Beach

ROBERT WILSON
Portrait Trilogy:Einstein; Akhnaten; Gandhi

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Einstein on the Beach is an opera in four acts (framed and connected by five “knee plays” or intermezzos), scored by Philip Glass and directed by theatrical producer Robert Wilson. The opera eschews traditional narrative in favor of a formalist approach based on structured spaces laid out by Wilson in a series of storyboards. The music was written “in the spring, summer and fall of 1975.”Glass recounts the collaborative process: “I put [Wilson’s notebook of sketches] on the piano and composed each section like a portrait of the drawing before me. The score was begun in the spring of 1975 and completed by the following November, and those drawings were before me all the time.”
full opera

ROBERT WILSON

بوب ويلسون
鲍伯·威尔逊
בוב וילסון
ロバート·ウィルソン
밥 윌슨
Боб Уилсон
SHAKESPEAR`S SONETTES
Staging Shakespeare, not dramatic but lyrical: that was the intention of the American director Bob Wilson in Sonnets de Shakespeares (Sonnets de Shakespeare), a show on display at the Berliner Ensemble. To that end, Wilson is associated with American-Canadian composer and musician Rufus Wainwright. The result is a variety night, with reference to all genres of entertainment, from the commedia dell’arte to television sketches, passing through the cabaret. If in the Elizabethan era female roles were played by men, Bob Wilson did the same, creating this reverse practice: actresses play male roles. This inversion – Queen Elizabeth 1st, on her throne, declaiming a sonnet with a deep voice and Shakespeare himself, as a young man and an elder, in female voices – further intensifies the farcical tone of the show. So much so that even the sporadic number of transvestite actor Georgette Dee, microphone in hand, does not disagree much of the Shakespearean surroundings.

Matic Veler

Matic Veler is ispired by researching his aesthetic development since upbringing up until now. One of the biggest inspiration, architecture of 17th and 18th century architecture, especially details and ornaments together with impression of magical environments combined with brutalism architecture he was surrounded in when he was child, help him to translate and reflect when creating garments and installations to impress viewers and customers. ​He uses Baroque architecture details and ornaments as his inspiration. Always starting with collecting different photos of details and studying different architects. 
Matic manipulates the ornaments into collages on which he draw sketches and then making toiles on mannequins.

Frederick Kiesler

Kiesler’s longest-running project was Endless House, a single-family dwelling whose biomorphic form and lack of corners strongly contrasted with the hard geometric edges that defined most modern architecture of the time. He sought to design a structure responsive to the occupants’ functional and spiritual requirements. He developed his ideas for the house over several decades, creating numerous sketches and models. Although plans were made to build a to-scale model in MoMA’s Sculpture Garden in 1958, they did not materialize, and the project remains unrealized. Nonetheless, Kiesler’s Endless House concept was highly influential and stands as a strong expression of his bold statement: “Form does not follow function. Function follows vision. Vision follows reality.”

video

ROBERT WILSON

بوب ويلسون
鲍伯·威尔逊
בוב וילסון
ロバート·ウィルソン
밥 윌슨
БОБ УИЛСОН
SHAKESPEAR`S SONETTES

SONETTES DE SHAKESPEAR
Poner en escena a Shakespeare, no dramático sino lírico: esa era la intención del director estadounidense Bob Wilson en Sonnets de Shakespeare (Sonnets de Shakespeare), espectáculo que se exhibe en el Berliner Ensemble. Con ese fin, Wilson está asociado con el compositor y músico estadounidense-canadiense Rufus Wainwright. El resultado es una noche de variedades, con referencia a todos los géneros de entretenimiento, desde la commedia dell’arte hasta los sketches televisivos, pasando por el cabaret. Si en la era isabelina los roles femeninos eran interpretados por hombres, Bob Wilson hizo lo mismo, creando esta práctica inversa: las actrices interpretan roles masculinos. Esta inversión – la reina Isabel I, en su trono, declamando un soneto con una voz profunda y el propio Shakespeare, de joven y anciano, con voces femeninas – intensifica aún más el tono de farsa del espectáculo. Tanto es así que ni siquiera el esporádico número de la actriz travesti Georgette Dee, micrófono en mano, disiente mucho del entorno shakesperiano.

MACOTO MURAYAMA

村山诚泰
METAMACHINE
Sunflower

Macoto Murayama cultivates inorganic flora. First, he chooses the plant and finds the real flower, for example the exquisite Lathyrus odoratus L. Second, he dissects the flower cutting the petal and ovary with scalpel and observes it with magnifying glass. Third, he makes sketches and photographs the parts of dissected flower.

Aisha Zeijpveld

What Remains
By crafting bodily optical illusions, the Aisha Zeijpveld ‘What Remains’ series obscures reality. These captures were taken by Amsterdam-based photographer Aisha Zeijpveld. According to her website, Zeijpveld’s “focus on people their nakedness and vulnerability yet simultaneously their potency and pride characterizes her photography.” In order to create that capacity in her work, the ‘What Remains’ series was based around the sketches of Austrian artist Egon Schiele. By translating these sketches into photographs, Zeijpveld recreates the expressive figures portrayed by Schiele often were “unfinished.”

FIONA TAN

פיונה טאן
フィオナ·タン
Фиона Тан
فيونا تان
Rise and Fall
Fiona Tan explores storytelling, memory, and the part they play in the formation of identity throughout this exhibition of five video installations, various associated sketches and one single-channel video. Rise and Fall (2009), elongated projections onto two large, side-by-side screens, is a wordless meditation, set to music, of a woman no longer young but still conscious of her looks; she was clearly a beauty in her youth. As the video proceeds we gather that the young woman pictured on the second screen is the memory of her younger self. They often move through domestic activities (sleeping, bathing, dressing) in parallel; this is inter-cut with scenes of violently rushing water (shot at Niagra Falls, it turns out). It’s a hackneyed metaphor – the water’s endless surging as an image of time’s relentless uni-directionality – but in Tan’s hands that doesn’t seem to matter; she creates extraordinarily emotional work out of simple stories and well-worn themes.

POUL GERNES

Drømmeskib / Dream Ship
n the early 1960s, Poul Gernes started to concentrate on simple, reduced forms making strong visual effects like circles, stripes or dots in his painting, similar to pop motivs. Most of the approx. 40 Targets painted then were designs for architecture-related works. At first he drew the rings for his Targets in pencil, but later he went over to scratching them into the ground with a pair of compasses. This gave the paintings a relief-like character and created clearly defined color fields. The contrasting color intensities in the circles make each color seem like a distinct, three-dimensional volume. The vivid color combinations of the Targets (shown at the Venice Biennale in 1988) come from sketches or ready-mades like the stripes on a t-shirt. Sometimes Gernes used random systems as well, for example by putting paint pots behind him and dipping the paintbrush into one pot blind. Although it may not seem to be the case, Gernes’ work makes no passing references to contemporary works by other artists.