PAUL ROBERTSON

File Festival
Paul Robertson is an Australian animator and digital artist who is known for his pixel art used in short films and video games. He is mostly known for Scott Pilgrim Vs. the World: The Game and the recent release, Mercenary Kings. Apart from his seasoned career as a game designer and movie creator, Robertson has been recently spotted on Tumblr with these GIFS. His interest in inserting flashing neon colors, geometric shapes, Japanese character animation, and 1990′s computer imagery, deems his work as heavily influenced by the Seapunk/Vaporwave aesthetic.

MALIN BÜLOW

Elastic Bonding
Bülow’s performative installations draw attention to the body and in particular the skin. With next to clinical sharpness she seeks to touch upon the relational painspots around our existence. She works together with dancers that become activators and holders of her elastic, sensi-claustrophobic interventions.

Anish Kapoor

Destierro
Destierro – which translates from Spanish into ‘exile’[…] features three installations that see Kapoor veering back towards his signature style of work with pigmented powder. However, unlike his previous work, the three pieces on display in Argentina shine a spotlight on the global migration crisis marking a change in direction for Kapoor who has, up until recently, shied away from making political work.

Nina Katchadourian

Survive the Savage Sea

When I was seven years old, my mother read a book aloud to me titled Survive the Savage Sea (1973). It was the true story of the Robertsons, a family of farmers in England who sold all their possessions to buy a sailboat with the intent of sailing around the world for several years. In June 1972, the Robertsons lost their sailboat in a remote part of the Pacific Ocean when a pod of Orca smashed the hull, leaving the four adults and two children adrift for 38 days. After their inflatable life raft grew too leaky to be safe, they abandoned it for their nine-foot fiberglass dinghy, Ednamair, a vessel so small that with everyone aboard only six inches of the boat remained above the waterline. The family navigated to areas where they could collect rainwater and survived by finding ways to catch sea turtles, dorado, and flying fish until they were spotted and rescued by the crew of a Japanese fishing boat.

video

Andrea Polli

Particle Falls

Particle Falls is a large-scale, real-time visualization of air-quality data.On a background of falling blue light, spots of bright, fiery color emerge and crackle, representing the presence of fine particulate matter, as detected by a nearby air monitor. Fewer bright spots over the falls mean fewer particles in the air.Particle Falls draws our attention to the invisible particles that surround us and that may affect our health. While the visible smog that plagued many U.S. urban centers decades ago has been mitigated by technology and regulatory measures, microscopic threats to our air continue to exist and often go unnoticed. Particle Falls is one way we can learn more about the quality of air around us.

Jelle Mastenbroek

The Robin Who Wondered If He Was a Nightingale
Various members of orchestra perform impressive improvisations based on your identity and the natural environment. The flutes combine their sounds with the rhythm of the percussion. The special acoustics of the forest played an important role. Every time an attempt is made to deliver the highest quality of improvisation and to achieve more than perfectly played notes. This creates a magical and unforgettable experience. Musicians: Nightingale, Cuckoo, Moorhen, Pigeon, Curlew, Black-billed Cuckoo, House Sparrow, Little Owl, Woodcock, Green Woodpecker, Great Spotted Woodpecker, Middle Spotted Woodpecker, Lesser Spotted Woodpecker.

Takuya Matsunobu and Yasuaki Kakehi

Coworo
Coworo is an installation with a shape changing liquid that loses its texture under a spotlight and looks almost solid. After a while, bubbles appear on the surface and disappear again, as if it were breathing. The waves gradually change their size, position, and frequency and develop into physical, continual, kinetic, three-dimensional animations that extend beyond the discrete 2D pixel pattern. Through the hybrid combination of the digitally programmed machine and the organic properties of the physical material, the object creates a constant flux of ephemeral shapes and patterns.

Anne-Sarah Le Meur & Jean-Jacques Birgé

Omni-Vermille
Omni-Vermille is based on computer-generated real-time 3D images. The programmed code allows light spots to oscillate against a dark background. The colors sometimes move dynamically, sometimes calmly across the projection surface; sometimes they evoke plasticity, sometimes depth. This continuous metamorphosis endows the contents of the images with a sensual, even lively quality. The metamorphosis designed by algorithms opens up a new time-based morphology of colors and forms for painting. The play of colors is accompanied by a stereophonic sound composition by Jean-Jacques Birgé (*1952, France). The sounds follow the shapes of the colors, only to stand out again the next moment: the combination of sound and image results entirely from the laws of random simultaneity.

SOU FUJIMOTO ARCHITECTS

على فوجيموتو
후지모토에
על פוג’ימוטו
НА ФУДЗИМОТО
Forest of Light
“In this installation for COS, I envisage to make a forest of light,” said Fujimoto. “A forest which consists of countless light cones made from spotlights above. These lights pulsate and constantly undergo transience of state and flow. People meander through this forest, as if lured by the charm of the light. Light and people interact with one another, its existence defining the transition of the other.”

KUNIHIKO MORINAGA

森永邦彦
쿠니히코 모리나가
くにひこ もりなが
КУНИХИКО МОРИНАГА
Anrealage

Kunihiko Morinaga, the creative director of cult Japanese label Anrealage, has a thing for sensations and optical illusions. His debut Paris show last season was about light and shadow. Today, his sophomore outing focused on light and dark. Or, better, on the impressions you get from flashing or projecting light in pitch black. The Anrealage sculptural silhouettes were cut in a special black fabric that revealed a printed texture only under ultraviolet lights, or had needle-punched white circles—like a spotlight projection—splattered across the front. To emphasize the depth of such darkness, everything was black, including models’ faces, a heavy stroke that made things a little too dramatic.

Yonakani: Young ah Seong, Takuji Narumi & Tomohiro Akagawa

Thermotaxis
file festival
The term “Thermotaxis” signifies a movement of a living organism in response to heat stimulation. A thermal spot has power to encourage people to gather together like open fires in winter or water places in summer. The work “Thermotaxis” characterizes the open space as invisible thermal spots by providing people with thermal information. Our work aims to create a new spatial structure for communication not by architectural approach but by using information technology.

Richard Quinn

Fall 2018
Even though he was only given a few days’ notice of the royal’s attendance, Quinn lived up to the expectations. He maintained his focused vision, shining the spotlight on his impressive printwork and flair for standout, dramatic silhouettes. An array of abstracted floral prints — all created in-house at the designer’s print studio in Peckham — were mashed up on loose halterneck dresses, delicately pleated chiffon skirts and oversize bomber jackets, to create a visual feast of color and pattern.

KOEN HAUSER

VLISCO HOMMAGE À L’ART
The Hommage à l’Art series was commissioned by Vlisco and it honours Vlisco’s art by placing their heritage of iconic drawings in the spotlight. These drawings were recreated into icons as gold statues in photographs inspired by Vlisco’s heritage and the women who wear Vlisco fabrics in a proud, almost regal way, as in royal portraiture.

ROBERT WILSON, WILLIAM BURROUGHS AND TOM WAITS

The Black Rider
The Black Rider is in twelve parts and a prologue. I had the idea that there would be indoor and outdoor scenes, man-made and natural environments, and that the scenes would alternate. I made a prologue to introduce the company. It begins with a black box standing up. The devil and the entire company come out of the box until they all stand in a line in front of the stage, as in a circus where all artists are introduced at the beginning. Then the devil sings a song: “Come on along with the Black Rider, we’ll have a gay old time. Take off your skin and dance around in your bones. I’ll drink your blood like wine. Come on along with the Black Rider, we’ll have a gay old time…” Anyways, the audience gets a certain idea what the piece is going to be like. Then the characters disappear and the black box gets bigger and bigger, until the whole stage is engulfed in this black spot. The first scene takes place in the interior of a room, with an old family portrait on the back wall – played by an actor.

girl walk

all day
Girl Walk // All Day is a 71-minute Kickstarter-funded dance epic set to Girl Talk’s 2010 album All Day. The piece was filmed all over New York City, which people started to figure out several months ago when a very excitable girl was spotted losing her mind on the Staten Island Ferry. The movie is premiering in 12 chunks on New York blog Gothamist from now until mid-January and is definitely worth your time (unless you hate fun).

karolina halatek

TERMINAL
Terminal is a light space, that shines alone at night, separate from the outside world and yet open at both ends, a passage and a space of other kind at the same time, that dissolves in light. In art, light means enactment and dramatization, in this way the light space is a stage on which one gets isolated from the outside world as a spectator, but stands in the spotlight at the same time seen by everyone. At nights the Terminal is a light source: a star, that shines on the square, a shining riddle, that strangely isn’t media nor street light, pointless, but therefore very poetic[…]

muk

disc.o
File Festival

disc.o is a multiplayer music instrument with eight CD player and corresponding speakers
arranged in a circular spatial installation. Sequentially switched Light spots in combination with
graphical cutouts in the CDs are creating noise patterns based on the principle of optical sound.

ART+COM

Mobility
The installation spans a corridor of 7-metres width. On the left wall one hundred prosthetic hands arranged in a matrix revolve around their own vertical axis, the movements being controlled by motors. The mirrors they hold reflect the beam of a strong light across the space and onto the opposite wall. What initially seems like an asynchronous, chaotic pattern of movement soon reveals itself as a complex, computational choreography: at first the hundred light spots move around a central point, akin to the celestial dynamics of the planets or the flight pattern of a swarm of insects and creating the impression of a three-dimensional space. Then suddenly this organic oscillation converges to form a Chinese character denoting movement and action.

CSILLA KLENYÁNSZKI

X MARKS THE SPOT
Die rätselhaften Fotos der ungarischen Künstlerin CSILLA KLEYÁNSZKI, die 1986 geboren wurde, stimulieren uns, die Realität des Alltags auf neue Weise zu beobachten.

DAVID BYRNE

Tight Spot

FONG QI WEI

퐁 치 웨이

‘Time is a Dimension’

The beauty of photography, in its essence, is conveyed by capturing a moment in time and freezing it out of its context. Singapore-based photographer Fong Qi Wei, however, uses photography to show the passage of time. In his time lapse series called ‘Time is a Dimension’, Fong doesn’t use a typical long exposure trick. He captures the passing time by layering different photos of the same spot with clear edge lines of each frame. Each collage is digitally cut and created from pictures Fong takes within 2 to to 4 hours. Fong usually works at sunrise or sunset, as the light and color palettes are most varied at those times.
“The basic structure of a landscape is present in every piece. But each panel or concentric layer shows a different slice of time, which is related to the adjacent panel/layer. The transition from daytime to night is gradual and noticeable in every piece, but would not be something you expect to see in a still image. Similarly, our experience of a scene is more than a snapshot,” explains Fong.

Tobias Putrih

Re-projection: Hoosac

Influenced by the utopian projects — and notable failures — of innovative artists and designers such as Buckminster Fuller, Frederick Kiesler, and Charles Eames, Tobias Putrih likens his works to experiments, or design prototypes. His use of cheap materials, including egg crates, cardboard, and plywood signify both a sense of potential and impending collapse. Many of the artist’s works reference the architecture and spectacle of the cinema: a space suspended between fantasy and reality, image and environment. With Re-projection: Hoosac Putrih distills the cinema to its most basic element: fishing line stretched across the gallery mimics the conical trajectory of a beam of light. A spotlight hits the strands of monofilament which in turn become a screen, reflecting an image in illuminated dots. Inspired by the Hoosac Tunnel just east of North Adams — a storied, engineering marvel that draws ghost-hunters to the area — Putrih’s tunnel is, likewise, both real and a representation, an optical trick that invites both wonder and investigation.

Roni Horn

Kafka’s Palindrome
It would be enough/to consider the spot/where I am as/some other spot

STEVE WILHITE

dancing baby
GIF (JIF)
graphics interchange format

The inventor of the Gif file has revealed that the world has been mispronouncing his creation.
Steve Wilhite, who invented the Gif file in 1987, told the New York Times that the word is pronounced “jif” not “giff”.
“The Oxford English Dictionary accepts both pronunciations. They are wrong. It is a soft ‘G,’ pronounced ‘jif.’ End of story,” he said.
The internet has reacted strongly to Wilhite’s claim, pointing to a range of evidence from the White House announcing their allegiance via a note on their Tumblr: “Animated GIFs (Hard ‘G’)”, to simple common consensus.
Others have suggested that the hard ‘G’ relates to the acronym that the word springs from, which stands for Graphical Interface Format.
The Gif has enjoyed a surge of success in the last five years thanks to Buzzfeed-style listings of puppies and kittens and ‘live-giffing’, a form of on-the-spot reporting that had its first major outing during the 2012 presidential debates.
Wilhite may be the parent of the Gif, but most agree that the creation has outgrown its creator.
When even the White House is on the other side of the debate, it seems it might be best if Wilhite concedes defeat with grace.

DARSHA HEWITT

Hotspot Twinklers

fred lebain

Фрейд Лебайн
A Spring in New York

fred lebain is not scared of the mundane or clichés.
instead, he plays with them, superimposing their images on one another. last spring lebain took images of various areas in new york city, each one of them an occasion of a ‘first visit’ to the location, in which he photographed and then printed in large poster format. later, he returned to the same spots for a second visit, capturing a larger framed shot in which he aligned the poster documenting his first visit to the current scene. these postcard images show lebain’s preference for particular areas of the city, telescoping his views – a time parallax representing the days which separate the two shots – and superimposing his vision of new york. hands, feet or a pair of jeans can be seen… like surrealistic winks, indicating that the photographer is not alone in his mission.

CSILLA KLENYÁNSZKI

X marks the spot
THE ENIGMATIC PHOTOGRAPHS OF HUNGARIAN ARTIST CSILLA KLEYÁNSZKI -BORN IN 1986- STIMULATE US TO OBSERVE EVERYDAY REALITY IN A NEW WAY.