Tilman Küntzel

Falling Chandelier
L’installation audiovisuelle Fallen Chandelier est basée sur une sonification d’un système de contrôle provoquant le scintillement de quarante ampoules à l’intérieur d’un lustre tombé. Vingt starters interconnectés, similaires à ceux que l’on trouve couramment dans les tubes fluorescents, génèrent un rythme lumineux irrégulier. Cela se produit au moyen de bilames qui sont chauffés dans un tube et entrent ainsi en contact les uns avec les autres en séquence rapide. Ce processus est audible. Chaque démarreur génère son propre rythme, qui a un son différent selon la marque, la composition et le degré d’usure des démarreurs. « J’écoute d’abord beaucoup de starters avant de les utiliser pour une installation dans le sens de la composition. »

Bernardi Roig

NO/Escape
Mallorcan artist Bernardi Roig (b. 1965) installs six sculptural works in unexpected interior and exterior spaces, challenging visitors to rethink the definition of the museum. Roig draws parallels between his and Honoré Daumier’s works, both of which offer poignant social commentary. Roig addresses the existential dualities of entrapment and liberation, blinding and illumination, absence and presence. Typical of the artist’s work are the cruel-looking white plaster figures cast from real people, often cornered or crushed against walls or twisting in pain. By including the element of light—whether a single light bulb, neon tubes, or fluorescent lights—Roig’s work blends minimalist forms with highly charged expressions of anxiety and loneliness.

Terreform ONE

PLUG-IN ECOLOGY: Urban Farm Pod with Agronomy
The Plug-In Ecology; Urban Farm Pod is a “living” cabin for individuals and urban nuclear families to grow and provide for their daily vegetable needs. It is an interface with the city, potentially touching upon urban farming, air quality levels, DIY agronomy techniques in test tubes, algal energy production, and bioluminescent light sources, to name a few possibilities. It can be outfitted with a number of optional systems to adapt to different locations, lighting conditions, and habitation requirements. While agricultural food sources are usually invisible in cities such as New York, the pod archetype turns the food system itself into a visible artifact, a bio-informatic message system, and a functional space.

Hybe

Light Tree: Interactive Dan Flavin
HYBE’s Light Tree: Interactive Dan Flavin re-illuminates the minimalist fluorescent light tubes of Dan Flavin from the 1960s, through digital technology. Experimenting with light and its effect, Flavin explored artistic meaning in relationships between light, situation, and environment. The readymade fluorescent light fixtures he used created space divided and adjusted by light and composition, offering a newly structured space with light. HYBE’s work expands the logic of Flavin by reinforcing the physical property of light through interactive media. It presents an escape from traditional lighting, as light and color changes when touched by viewers. Lighting here is divided into front and back, and colors are programmed to maintain complementary colors. The front lighting constantly interacts with colors on a back wall through visual contrast and mixture. A random change and diffusion of light with the involvement of viewers provokes tension extending and segmenting space, turning space into a forum for emotional perceptual experience.

kenneth snelson

Needle Tower
“Inspired by architect Buckminster Fuller’s interest in the geometry of structure, Snelson’s experiments led to a prototype for a “floating compression structure.” Fuller subsequently credited Snelson with having invented a new structural principle which the architect named tensegrity, a contraction of the words tension and integrity.
These investigations into the physical properties of structure became more fully realized as an art form beginning in the 1950s. Snelson created sculptures consisting of tubes and cables. Cylinders of steel seemingly dance through space in defiance of gravity, yet it is the structural competition between tension and compression which underlies their construction. Snelson finds beauty in bringing these forces of nature into balance: the rigid compression tubes pushing outward, the flexible tension cables pulling inward. His sculptures would maintain their structural integrity beyond gravity, in the vacuum of outer space.” Joelle Burrows

Thomas Feuerstein

NYMPHAE
Manna Sculpture
The sculptures MANNA MACHINE are photobioreactors in which algae (Chlorella vulgaris) grow. The tubes and hoses form a drawing in space and are used for photosynthesis, similar to the leaves of a plant. The resulting biomass is filtered, dried and processed into pigment.

Chris Fraser

Atmosphere
For Atmosphere, glass tubes filled with argon and neon simulated the color of the Arizona sky. Arranged as a column, these tubes altered the shadows of visitors, casting them in pillar-form. The space was designed to respond to the actions of its inhabitants, encouraging them to investigate, play with and probe the air.
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Yunchul Kim

Argos
The work Argos is a 41-channel muon particle detector. It reacts with a flash each time a muon particle emitted by the universe is detected in the air – a mechanism that is carried over to another work titled Impulse. Taking the form of a chandelier, Impulse is a work consisting of numerous cylindrical tubes that extend out like the hanging branches of a tree as clear fluid flows through them. Every time Argos detects a particle, it transmits a signal to Impulse, with the result that we can see with our own eyes the air bubbles and motion of the fluid running through the artwork.

Christian Babski, Stéphane Carion, Christophe Guignar & Patrick Keller

Satellite Daylight
Satellite Daylight is an interactive light installation formed by a trapeze of 24 high-voltage neon tubes tapering upwards, created by fabric | ch – a studio for architecture, interaction and research dedicated to investigating contemporary space based in Lausanne. The installation is connected to data collected in real time from online weather stations and meteorological satellite maps, which therefore translate actual global light conditions picked up by satellites orbiting the earth at the latitude of Basel into an endless loop of perceivable electrical intensity.

REVITAL COHEN & TUUR VAN BALEN

The Immortal
A number of life-support machines are connected to each other, circulating liquids and air in attempt to mimic a biological structure.
The Immortal investigates human dependence on electronics, the desire to make machines replicate organisms and our perception of anatomy as reflected by biomedical engineering.
A web of tubes and electric cords are interwoven in closed circuits through a Heart-Lung Machine, Dialysis Machine, an Infant Incubator, a Mechanical Ventilator and an Intraoperative Cell Salvage Machine. The organ replacement machines operate in orchestrated loops, keeping each other alive through circulation of electrical impulses, oxygen and artificial blood.
Salted water acts as blood replacement: throughout the artificial circulatory system minerals are added and filtered out again, the blood gets oxygenated via contact with the oxygen cycle, and an ECG device monitors the system’s heartbeat. As the fluid pumps around the room in a meditative pulse, the sound of mechanical breath and slow humming of motors resonates in the body through a comforting yet disquieting soundscape.Life support machines are extraordinary devices; computers designed to activate our bodies when anatomy fails, hidden away in hospital wards. Although they are designed as the ultimate utilitarian appliances, they are extremely meaningful and carry a complex social, cultural and ethical subtext. While life prolonging technologies are invented as emergency measures to combat or delay death, my interest lies in considering these devices as a human enhancement strategy.This work is a continuation of my investigation of the patient as a cyborg, questioning the relationship between medicine and techno- fantasies about mechanical bodies, hyper abilities and posthumanism.

Claire Williams

Zoryas
Six formes reposent au centre d’un grand disque plat. L’une rappelle les morceaux de silice amorphe produits par l’impact de la foudre sur le sable, les autres semblent pareilles à des méduses, coraux ou algues qui peupleraient des fonds marins dont on ne sait rien. Chacune d’elle est emplie d’une matière-énergie de teinte et de structure à nulle autre égale. Les six formes sont toutes différentes mais elles appartiennent sans aucun doute à la même classe d’objet, la même catégorie de choses. Aux physiciens, elles rappellent les tubes utilisés par Heinrich Geissler pour expérimenter sur le comportement de certains gaz lorsqu’ils sont traversés par des courants électriques. A ceux qui fréquentent les boutiques des musées de sciences, elles rappellent les globes luminescents qui réagissent aux toucher. Aux explorateur des hautes latitudes, elles rappellent les aurores boréales. Elles sont à la fois tout cela et rien de cela.

Where Dogs Run

Smell of faces
This unique, ever-changing pattern is visualized in a facial composite. This is how it works: when a person approaches the analyzer, sniffing tubes “sniff him, then gas analyzers process the information, which then passes to a computer program that translate air composition data into data concerning the shape and position of facial features (the components of a facial composite). As a result, a person sees a face of their smell that is conditional, in no way related to their actual physical appearance.

JORG NIEHAGE

Samplingplong
File Festival

Randomly selected, acoustically usable finds (electronic junk, relays, plastic toys,compressed air valves, pneumatically operated components) are combined with cables and tubes. Via a device controlled by computer, they are turned into interactive instruments. An improvised ensemble evolves, from which – per mouse-over and mouse-click -short miniature compositions of dense rhythmic clicks, hisses, whirs, hums and crackles can be elicited. A tapestry of sound bursts forth from the floral-like web of cables and tubes. The installation can be used by the projected mouse-cursor: rolling over the improvised instruments causes small sound events. Activating the installation by rolling over its parts enables the user to play spontaneous improvisations. Clicking these objects starts short programs of loop-like compositions. Small “techno-compositions en miniature”, rhythmic patterns of analog (or real) sounds; a physical low-tech simulation of electronic, digital music, perhaps an ironic comment on interactivity.

Raster-Noton

White Circle
»White Circle« consists of fluorescent tubes that respond to musical impulses and illuminate the room. Five dedicated compositions by alva noto, byetone, frank bretschneider, and kangding ray playing in a continuous loop (one set takes ca. 45 minutes) model the interrelation between sound, light, and architecture in different ways. Each piece represents an independent and self-contained conceptual proposal by the respective composer. All tracks are multichannel compositions based on the idea of creating a vivid immediate experience of auditory space and visual stimuli. With acoustic material routed to twentyseven speakers placed throughout the gallery, sound itself takes on a threedimensional and indeed sculptural quality.

Natura Machina

Soundform No.1
“Soundform No.1” is a minimalistic soundscape and kinetic art installation that transforms heat energy into a poetically evolving, spatiotemporal composition. All the sound in this installation is created thermo acoustically by activating heating elements inside quartz glass tubes hung in the space. As the glass warms, a nickel-titanium spring reacts instantly, pulling the cylinder upright. At the correct angle, airflow becomes unrestricted, and a thermo acoustic phenomenon, known as a Rijke effect (named for the professor who discovered the phenomenon in 1859), creates an audible tone.

Marleen Sleeuwits

INTERIOR N0. 58

Primarily working within abandoned office spaces, her process involves stripping the rooms down to their individual components, laying bare the layers found beneath the surfaces. She then re-assembles the room using materials found on-site, such as fluorescent tubes, paper towels, laminate, and tape, by adapting techniques of sculpture, painting and drawing.

Onformative

True/False
True/False is a kinetic sculpture composed of arrays of circular black metal segments set in mechanical columns. Interlocking and rotating around fluorescent light tubes, the cylinders cover or expose the light to display an endless number of patterns. The transformation of the sculpture is based on the shifting elements and their correlation to each other. As the segments do not move independently, for any of the cylinders on a column to change, the segments affected must work in unison to achieve the command. Reminiscent of devices originally used for calculations, such as Turing machines, the sound originates from the mechanical movement of the moving parts thus making the algorithm audible. The rhythm of »true/false« is captivating as variations in the visual choreography result in distinctive changes in its soundscape. Through the generation of algorithmic patterns and the repetition of endless tasks, »true/false« transforms itself into something more than the sum of its elements to reveal the beauty hidden within a basic algorithm.

NIKOLAS WEINSTEIN

This installation, for a restaurant in San Francisco, responds to three large skylights high overhead in a long, narrow space. The design is an interpretation of “extruding” the skylights down through a partial false ceiling and into the more intimate space below. For this project, we pushed our glass fabric techniques (used in the Capella Hotel and the IHG Lobby installations) one step further, heating the woven glass fabric in a kiln for further shaping. This lets us deform the tubes in the fabric as well as flex the overall matrix to create large continuous glass surfaces that billow like sheets in a breeze.

YUNCHUL KIM

Impulse
The Cascade Project explores matter by capturing the pattern of muons: i.e. electrically charged subatomic particles. It does so through an installation comprised of three live elements: a muon detector; a complex assemblage of pumps; and an arrangement of tubes through which fluid flows. When muons are detected, a light and connected pumps are activated, triggering the movement of an uncanny, viscous fluid through the sculptural system.

CHIU CHIH

Voyage on the Planet
Designer Chiu Chih imagines a possible future where our cities have fallen into disrepair and the air is poisoned. In this wasteland, a woman wanders through the rubble, breathing with the help of a companion plant. The project, titled “Voyage on the planet,” consists of a clear box worn like a backpack. Two breathing tubes connect a face mask to the box. Inside, the box holds a potted plant, acting like a portable filter.

Marianthi Papalexandri-Alexandri

Untitled VI
für drei Männerstimmen und Klangobjekte
In Untitled VI the vocalists are singing with modified resonant tubes and motors the Greek word “akousate” that means to listen attentively. What happens when voice and singing are mediated and controlled with motor driven resonant bodies? How does this act of singing change the physical and imagined presence of the voice? How does it affect the process of intensive listening to one’s own voice, to one another, and to external sounds? Exploring these questions, Papalexandri encourages hearing the resonances between different voices and bodies.
text: Dr. Zeynep Bulut

Thomas Feuerstein

Psychoprosa

The exhibition PSYCHOPROSA focuses on mucus as a biochemical substance and sculptural material. The production of mucus takes place as a real process within the exhibition spaces, transforming the Frankfurter Kunstverein into an interconnecting ensemble of greenhouse, laboratory, walk-in refrigerator, cinema, and factory. Through tubes connected to one another, equipment and objects produce and transform their interior substances, refrigerators open and close automatically and transparent threads of mucus drip from expansive glass sculptures.

In close collaboration with biochemists, Thomas Feuerstein has developed the synthetic molecule Psilamin, derived from algae and fungi. In its production, large quantities of viscous biofilm are generated. If one were to take Psilamin, one would begin to feel psychotropic effects. Perception would liquefy, and objects in the room would appear soft and shapeless. Simultaneously, the flowing nature of the sculptural matter, which escapes solid form, externalizes an inner psychic process. At the end of the biochemical production process, which visitors can track in the different exhibition spaces, there is the expan-sive sculpture Accademia dei Secreti over whose glass containers vast amounts of mucus pour.

Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui / Yabin Studio & Eastman

Genesi
Figures in white coats wearing masks over their mouths, observing and conducting tests on other people. Between them stand glass cages suggestive of gigantic test tubes. GENESIS生长, as the title suggests, is a show about the origins of things. We are born and then we die, and in the meantime we undergo constant testing and increasing estrangement from the natural world.

SUSANA SOARES

Life Support
Les abeilles sont entraînées en utilisant le réflexe de Pavlov pour cibler une odeur spécifique et leur plage de détection comprend les phéromones, les toxines et le diagnostic des maladies. Non seulement ils peuvent parcourir de grandes distances à la recherche de ce que vous voulez qu’ils reniflent, mais cela ne prend que quelques minutes pour les entraîner, contrairement aux chiens dont la formation peut durer jusqu’à un an. Leur comportement peut être conditionné par des récompenses telles que l’eau sucrée. Ils sont placés dans des récipients en forme de paille et conçus pour sentir une combinaison, disons de sucre, avec de minuscules résidus de TNT. C’est tout! Le sens aigu de l’odorat des abeilles associera alors l’odeur des explosifs à la nourriture. Dans son projet BEE’S, Susana utiliserait les insectes comme biocapteurs, exploitant leur odorat extroadinaire pour détecter des maladies telles que le cancer du poumon, le cancer de la peau et la tuberculose. En outre, ils pouvaient repérer le problème très tôt bien mieux que les machines. Ils pourraient même détecter si une femme est enceinte, ce que je trouve beaucoup plus attrayant et élégant que la méthode habituelle qui consiste à faire pipi sur un morceau de plastique.La créatrice a visité la London Beekeepers Association et a utilisé du chewing-gum dans ses tests avec les abeilles. Elle a ensuite localisé un maître verrier et fait souffler des objets en verre. Les gens respiraient dans les outils de diagnostic en verre où les abeilles sont gardées pendant la courte période de temps nécessaire pour leur permettre de détecter les cycles généraux de santé et de fertilité. Pour éviter que la bouche n’entre en contact avec l’insecte, il existe deux sphères différentes, l’odeur de l’abeille étant suffisamment forte pour renifler ce que vous respirez à travers le verre. Bess se précipiterait dans les tubes qui mènent plus près de la respiration quand ils détectaient une maladie qu’ils associent à la nourriture. Dans son scénario, les gens recevraient des abeilles entraînées par la poste (rien de rare ici apparemment), procéderaient au test respiratoire que de libérer les abeilles.BEE’S explore comment nous pourrions cohabiter avec les systèmes biologiques naturels et utiliser leur potentiel pour augmenter nos capacités de perception. . Nous avons toujours coexisté avec ces systèmes, mais leur potentiel était inconnu. Ce projet est basé sur des recherches en cours qui ont fourni les connaissances nécessaires pour permettre de nouvelles interactions. L’objectif de ce projet est de développer des relations de collaboration entre la recherche scientifique et technologique, les apiculteurs et le design, entre autres, traduisant le résultat en systèmes et objets que les gens peuvent comprendre et utiliser, engendrant des ajustements significatifs.

Lina Ghotmeh

Light in Water Installation
‘Light in Water’ is a site-specific installation intended to provide an immersive and emotional experience. It was previously presented at Milan Design Week 2011. The installation took advantage of the unique status of the venue – one of the oldest concrete domes in Paris. The installation was thus adapted to the circular form of the space, defining the inner sanctuary as a ‘place to be’ and an outer area as a space for a bystander. There are sixteen rings of slotted tubes on the ceiling. From each hole, 60 drops of water fall every minute; in total 3 tons of water circulate in the space. The LED lights vibrate between on and off, with frequencies ranging from the shortest interval possible, at 7μs, allowing the viewer to materialise a point of light in water, up to 6000μs, where light becomes the line of water.

Ronald van der Meijs

A Time Capsule of Life
FILE FESTIVAL
The sculpture is created from plastic bags, a contemporary mode of collecting daily goods. When connected together they form a transparent structure of cells and conduits. By connecting the bags with air tubes the bags will be pumped up. This is put in motion by the movement of the audience who become part of the system, allowing the seed to grow out as a mature structure. By vacuum the balloon structure growth and decay alternate in a process of which man forms a natural part. When the sculpture is growing or reducing it causes a cracking sound because of the sort of plastic the shopping bags are made of.

ELLINOR ERICSSON

A student from Danish Design School, Ellinor Ericsson has designed a chair called TubeMe which was exhibited on the Stockholm Furniture Fair 2011. In designer’s words, “The TubeMe chair is about a tactile interaction with a chair. You are able to braid the naked chair with pillow tubes creating your own upholster with the different textiles. While actually sitting in the chair you can interact with it by using the tubes or just throw them around you and fall asleep being embraced.”

Charlotte Posenenske

Posenenske applied primary coloured sticky strips to paper, creasing them and then applying them in layers until shapes were built up – as in CMP 65 (1965) for example. She progressed to using sheet metal sprayed with monochrome paint which she then folded into sculptural shapes, and combined this with corrugated cardboard to produce the series ‘Vierkantrohre’ (Square Tubes, 1967) which look like ventilation shafts. She conceived these early sculptures as modules that could be adapted according to available space, each one assembled into a shape ultimately appropriate to the context it found itself in.

Thomas Feuerstein

PROMETHEUS DELIVERED

The marble sculpture PROMETHEUS DELIVERED – a replica of Prometheus Bound by Nicolas Sébastien Adam (1762) – is slowly decomposed by chemolithoautotrophic bacteria. The acidic process water from the bioreactor KAZBEK penetrates the body of the sculpture via tubes and runs off the surface of the stone. The limestone turns into gypsum while the sculpture slowly dissolves. The biomass of the bacteria is the energy source for human liver cells from which the organic sculpture OCTOPLASMA grows. Inorganic stone turns into organic meat. PROMETHEUS DELIVERED is a play on words, referring to birth in the sense of “delivery”, and to the central importance of the liver in myth.

Ernesto Neto and SHEN WEI DANCE ARTS

Anthropodino
Ernesto Neto’s interactive installation anthropodino, currently on display at the Park Avenue Armory, is a massive sensual playground that invites viewers to touch the various fabrics, lie down on a large purple beanbag, walk through the womb-like structure, and smell the aromatic fabric tubes dangling from above.

Cerith Wyn Evans

СЕРИС ВИН ЭВАНС
ケリス·ウィン·エヴァンス
Form in Space…By Light

‘Cerith’s installation sits beautifully within the space, unfolding as you walk through,’ explains Clarrie Wallis, Tate’s Senior Curator of Contemporary British Art. The neon experience builds, from a single ‘peep hole’ ring in the South Duveens, through which you can glimpse swirls of radial light and an imposing octagon in the central gallery. The fractured neon fragments look like frantically drawn sparkler-lines on fireworks night.But there’s method and logic within these celestial scribbles. Hidden in the design are references to a host of highbrow sources, from Japanese ‘Noh’ theatre, to Marcel Duchamp’s The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass), 1915-23. Don’t worry if you missed them. The beauty of rendering precise (verging on obscure) references in such a celebratory neon explosion allows for multiple – if not endless – interpretations.Each way you look at the sprawling 2km of neon tubing, a different shape or symbol emerges. No small thanks to the elegant way in which the structures have been painstakingly suspended. ‘There were over 1000 fixing points, and obviously we couldn’t drill 1000 holes in the Grade II listed building,’ Wallis explains. ‘We had to work with structural engineers very intensely, so as to be completely happy and convinced that we would be able to remove it without damaging the fabric of the building.’Though it seems too soon to be discussing the installation’s removal, Wallis has a point. It’s a visibly fragile, delicate sculpture – whose impermanence makes it more intriguing. As it is a site-specific sculpture, it can’t be recreated elsewhere. What’s more, because the neon tubes are filled with a constantly moving stream of pulsing, vibrating gasses, visitors will never see the same sculpture twice.

Jason Yi

terraform 01

“A sense of location within one’s physical space, culture and history plays a crucial role in the creation of my work. While images and ideas often begin with the landscape, I am also drawn to the incorporation of non-art materials (e.g., foam, packing peanuts, bubble wrap and PVC tubes) and the juxtaposition of ambiguous imagery, deliberately subverting viewer’s visual expectations. My work invokes the paradoxical notion of “harmonious conflict” where compositional/conceptual relationship of materials and images are questioned and yet valued.”

OTA+

Taipei Museum of Contemporary Art
This building proposal challenges the traditional definition of a museum and the conventional relationship between building and site. The ground floor of the building is reduced to a nominal footprint, enclosing only enough space for basic services, structure and ticketing functions. The ground plane is primarily reserved for exterior public space, including an art park, Hall of Fame, and garden walk. The bulk of the program and building mass are split by the open ground floor. Half of the building is coupled with the earth while the other half hovers in the air. The purpose is twofold; to minimize the damaging effects of extreme local weather by harnessing environmental flows toward productive outcomes and to re-conceptualize the identity of a modern art museum. The manicured roof plane of the below ground program is pocketed with water absorbing vegetation and catchment systems, while the hovering museum above expands to form open atriums, allowing diffuse light to brighten the space and passive airflow to comfortably condition the building.The program of the museum is interconnected. The Contemporary Museum of Art, Children’s Museum of Art and Administration are located within the floating mass. The lecture hall, parking, art resource center, library and classrooms are located below ground. The programs below ground are easily accessible and directly connected through vertical circulation tubes, providing both structural support for the floating mass above and space for movement systems, such as escalators, stairs and elevators between levels. All of the below ground programs are flooded with diffuse light passing through skylights that penetrate the landscape.

Arcangel Constantini

Phonotube
Phonotube are experimental instruments for live audio visual performance, constructed as Luminous instruments and sound sequencers, that use fluorescent lamp tubes and LED strips, as light sources. The tubes are covered with negative ofsset, printed with sound patterns that spin at variable speed. The oscillation from the light emitted by these patterns is transduced to sound, processed by light excitation, a variety of electronic circuits as pre-amps with photo-cells and phototransitors, voltage control oscillators, relays, Filters, 1bit attiny85 micro controler. The technological principle is based on the photophone, patented by Graham Bell and inspired by audio visuals experimenters as Norman Mclaren,that used the optical sound technology of Film. In the history of the invention of electronic sound instruments, the study of light and its behavior as a particle or wave, and its application to sound processes, had a relevant position and is currently, one of the areas of scientific research with the greatest potential in human communication.

santiago morilla

draws bathing man using floating pool tubes

JONATHAN JONES

In Jonathan Jones’ immersive installation ‘untitled (the tyranny of distance)’, six free standing walls have been covered in blue tarpaulin and glow with filtered light from fluorescent tubes articulated in a continuous chevron design. The chevrons are derived from elements of traditional Koori (South Eastern Aboriginal) line work and resonate with Western minimalism.

1024 architecture

VORTEX

Architectural fragment made from scaffolding, VORTEX has a raw wood skin highlighted by 12 lines of LED light as many generative and constructive project’s lines. Merging organic materials with new technologies, this hybrid architectural artwork wraps around and embraces the footbridge between the complex’s two buildings, revealing and enhancing the venue’s dynamic energy while working as a live visualizer of energy consumption.VORTEX evolves like a living organism; it breathes, trembles and emits pulses of light created using 1024’s MadMapper software. Manually controlled via a joystick, the structure can be synchronized to music and also displays its location’s energy consumption through a series of illuminated tubes. It ultimately answers to the ambient environment around it, capturing the Darwin Ecosystem Project’s unique energy consumption footprint, and converting it into data that is processed to spawn realtime visuals.
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Buckminster Fuller

Tensegrity Sphere

Sixty-Strut Tensegrity Sphere by Buckminster Fuller is both a feat of engineering and an object of beauty. Wire individually snakes through sixty stainless steel tubes, suspending them in a icosahedral (20 face) form. Tensional integrity, or tensegrity – a term coined by Fuller – is a structural-relationship principle.

MICHAEL BURTON AND MICHIKO NITTA

Algae Opera
singer: Louise Ashcroft
When we think of futuristic fashion, our minds often lean toward the minimalist designs of Star Trek or Tron. But maybe what we wear in the future will have more to do with what we eat than what we want to look like.
That’s the premise behind the algaculture symbiosis suit designed by Michael Burton and Michiko Nitta. The symbiosis suit is designed to make food for you as you go about your daily routine. A number of tubes, placed in front of your mouth, harness the CO2 you breathe and feed it to an ever-growing population of algae which lives in the suit. Stepping outside or sitting near a window provides the algae all the sun it requires.
Of course, the growing of algae isn’t the end-game here — it’s growing enough to eat three square meals a day of the stuff. The suit debuted at a recent event at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. There, an opera singer donned the algaculture symbiosis suit and serenaded the gathered crowd. The suit created new algae populations during her performance, which audience members were free to consume after the presentation.

PHILLIP STEARNS

فيليب ستيرنز
Impact Study No. 1
Impact Study #1 is a light installation consisting of 24 white neon tubes of varying length. These tubes are installed along a wall, each oriented vertically and arranged according to a horizontal contour. Tubes vary in size from 3.5 ft to 8 ft and are spaced 1.5ft. The overall dimensions of the work as documented are 36 ft wide and 8 ft tall.The tubes are lit sequentially according to hybrid analog-digital control circuitry. The circuitry detects radioactivity and translates it into a pattern of signals that are visualized as light moving along the formation of neon tubes. The effect will be that of rippling waves of light moving back and forth through the formation. The ambient lighting cast by the installation resembles light reflecting off the surface of a body of water.

ARMAN

Blue Paint Tubes

PASCAL BROCCOLICHI

Sonotubes II

FREDERIK HEYMAN

فريدريك هيمان
弗雷德里克·海曼
פרדריק היימן
フレデリックヘイマン
ФРЕДЕРИК ХЕЙМАН
Dans son travail délicieusement étrange, Frederik propose des ensembles fantastiques faits à la main avec des accessoires à base d’urine, ainsi que des campagnes de mode haut de gamme très, très nettes. Non content de demander à de beaux modèles de faire le travail visuel à sa place, Frederik enfonce des cigares dans leur bouche, peint des chevaux dessus ou allonge leurs bras dans de gros tubes charnus. Voir un gars qui est si doué dans ce qu’il fait mais avec un gros élément de «Je ferai tout ce que je veux» est rafraîchissant, hilarant et très impressionnant.

Cod.Act

振り子の合唱団
CYCLOID-E

This piece, which comprises a series of tubular pieces arranged horizontally and activated by a motor, generates a particular sound through its movement, which is unexpectedly harmonic. The artists have taken their interest in the mechanisms that generate wave motions as a starting point to create this sculpture: five metal tubes joined together feature sound sources and sensors that allow them to emit different sounds based on their rotations.
The sculpture runs through a series of rhythmic movements, like a dance, creating, in the words of the artists themselves, “a unique kinetic and polyphonic work, in the likeness of the “Cosmic Ballet” to which the physicist Johannes Kepler refers to in his “Music of the Spheres” in 1619.” This work is part of the reflection on the possible interactions between sound and movement developed by the artists since 1999, using electronic devices and inspired by the aesthetics of industrial machinery.