Vvzela KOOK

Psycho: 6 Symptoms
People’s mental activity often changes with the external environment, normal and abnormal is relative, mutual evolution, mutual migration, and there is no absolute normal and abnormal. Even if the people with healthy mentality mental activities may temporarily appear different levels, duration of varying lengths disorders in a certain situation or a specific period of time. I combined the computer generating and shot in creating this multi-screen audio-visual work. Mainly focusing on changes between six screens and possibility of flow, also designed to allow viewers to produce such “temporary exception” through the resonant stereo sense.

Maurice Benayoun

Brain Factory Prototype 2
Brain Factory is an installation that allows the audience to give a shape to human abstractions through Brain-Computer Interaction (BCI), and then to convert the resulting form into a physical object. The work examines the human specificity through abstract constructs such as LOVE, FREEDOM, and DESIRE. The project articulates the relationship between thought and matter, concept and object, humans and machine. Brain Factory uses Electroencephalography (EEG) data captured by BCI. As a brain activity is unique, we developed a novel calibration process of the individual data readings and associated emotional responses within a framework of binary outcomes. This is key for a real-time feedback – a biofeedback – between the virtual generative processes and the brain’s associated response.

Robert Henke and Anna Tskhovrebov

CBM 8032 AV
The CBM 8032 AV project is an exploration of the beauty of simple graphics and sound, using computers from the early 1980’s. This work is about the ambivalence between a contemporary aesthetic and the usage of obsolete and limited technology from 40 years ago. Everything presented within the project could have been done already in the 1980, but it needed the cultural backdrop of today to come up with the artistic ideas driving it.

Marta Revuelta

AI Facial Profiling, Levels of Paranoia

Inspired by the recent psychometric research papers who claimed to use an AI to detect the criminal potential of a person based only on a photo of his face, and taking the world of firearms as a starting point, we present a “physiognomic machine”, a computer vision and pattern recognition system that detects the ability of an individual to handle firearms and predicts his potential danger from a biometric analysis of his face. The device is based on a camera-weapon that captures faces as well as a machine with artificial intelligence and a mechanical system that classifies the profiled persons into two categories, those who present a high risk of being a threat and those who present a lower risk .

Universal Everything

Transfiguration (2020)
Transfiguration (2020) is a reworking of the Universal Everything studio classic from 2011, The Transfiguration. The Transfiguration was first shown at the studio’s first major solo exhibition Super-Computer Romantics at La Gaite Lyrique, Paris. Now completely remade using the latest procedural visual effects software, the updated CGI artwork brings new life to the ever-evolving walking figure, with a new foley-based soundtrack by Simon Pyke.

JON MCCORMACK

Fifty Sisters
“I am an artist and academic based in Melbourne, Australia. I am interested in the creative possibilities of computers and computation, in particular how computers can enhance and augment our creativity. My interests and research are relatively broad: philosophy, evolution, nature, visualisation, interaction design, software, sound, art and the moving image. I prefer the intersections between these fields, rather than the differences that set them apart.” Jon McCormack

Shinseungback Kimyonghun

flower

Flower presents a series of distorted flower images which have still been recognised as “flower” by a computer vision.

KOHEI NAWA

كوهي ناوا
名和晃平
КОХЕЙ НАВА
stroke-yana

TRANS, the newest series of sculptures by the artist Kohei Nawa, was produced using techniques that involve the use of the computer and a 3D scanner. The artist scans people using a 3D scanner and then uses computer graphics to create works using the scanned data as a basis. Once with the scanned models, Kohei uses techniques such as texture mapping and smoothing to carve and apply reliefs to his digital models. When finalized, the 3d models are used to create molds for the final sculptures.

jon mccormack

Fifty Sisters, Series of fifty evolved digital plant images
Fifty Sisters is comprised of fifty 1m x 1m images of computer synthesised plant-forms, algorithmically “grown” from computer code using artificial evolution and generative grammars. Each plant-like form is derived from the primitive graphic elements of oil company logos.

THOMAS ROBSON

Томас Робсон
توماس روبسون
トーマス・ロブソン

Art Remixer” Thomas Robson says he “develops collision art to confront received aesthetics & critically re-appraise imagery in a visually saturated world.” Whatever he says, the stuff is freaking cool. He has worked in graphic design and in interactive design for the web & TV for the BBC. But it seems like he’s more interested now in coloring outside the lines:
It is remarkable how diverse his work is in various series like Landscape with Data, Made in China and Luxe Art with styles and materials including collage, photography, computer graphics and even ceramics.

DENNIS NEUSCHAEFER-RUBE

The Wizard of Oz experiment

The Videoinstallation “The Wizard of Oz experiment” by Dennis Neuschaefer-Rube shows the movie „The Wizard of Oz“ 5829 times side by side. The movies are arranged in rows from left to right and time shifted by exactly one second each. The video starts at the top left, with the first second of the film and finishes bottom right with the last second of the film. The projection is in a continuous loop that repeats every 98 minutes.
A computer voice speaks the whole subtitles of the film „The Wizard of Oz.“ in a 68-minute loop.

PLAPLAX

FILE SAO PAULO 2017
KAGE-TABLE
Since old times, the shadow proved the existence (for a ghost has no shadow). However, like the image projected on the TV monitor (which is “virtual” in this sense) the shadow itself doesn’t have substance. And at the same time, as we can see in the shadow picture, the shadow or silhouette stands as the basis of the image. In “KAGE-table”, we took the notice of this shadow-substance characteristic and by using cone-shaped object I created its shadow with computer graphics.

Shinseungback Kimyonghun

Aposematic Jacket
‘Aposematic Jacket’ is a wearable computer for self-defense. The lenses on the jacket give off the warning signal, “I can record you”, to prevent possible attack. When the wearer pushes a button under threat, the jacket records the scene in 360 degrees and sends the images to the Web.

RYOICHI KUROKAWA

黒川良一
rheo
This world-renowned Japanese artist’s impressive audiovisual compositions bring visual and sonic material together using a completely revolutionary perspective. His language, a new international benchmark in the world of digital art, field recordings and computer-generated structures coexist in harmony, and open the gateway to an imaginary world where complexity and simplicity alternate and combine in a strange symbiosis.

Amy Karle

Biofeedback Artwork

Amy Karle connects her body and consciousness to technology to create art, repurposing a Sandin Image Processor as an electrophysiological visualization device. While meditating, Amy Karle inputs her biofeedback into the historically significant Sandin IP analog computer to generate the output of image and sound in real-time. The artwork is both the long-duration performance as well as the experimental video art that is created in the process.

PAUL FRIEDLANDER

بول فريدلاندر
ポール·フリードランダー
The Brain Unravelled
“The installation is a development of the long standing wave series. It is the first light sculpture to be lit entirely by LEDs. Many thanks to my electronics engineer, Louis Norwood, for helping realise some ideas I have been contemplating for years and finally the technology has matured so I now have a completely new computer controllable light source.” Paul Friedlander

CHANG YEN TZU

Self Luminous 2 – Unbalance
Self-luminous 2 is an experimental handmade instrument shown as performance. It is a series-project which I have been working on since 2013 and finally developed into shape in 2014. I am looking for intimate and personal instrument that reflects on the relation of digital sound and light message. In computer language, light on is 1 and light off is 0. If more than 2 lamps, it could be code or readable possibility by the meanings. When I press the button or turn the knob, the message will be sent to Pure Data, and the sound will be triggered in live by Pure Data.
The Data of sound such as frequency and volume, are analysed and sent out to the second Arduino to control the light. The light, in thus case, is an intuitive element for human beings. From this point, it is really close to sound which disturbs our biological body directly. The lights are visualised and they can be transferred the into messages. The message might be readable by coincidence with the link to the code. The light is bright enough to let audience to have persistence of vision in mind. During the performance, the sound will be reproduced by code and part of it is impromptu.
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VTOL

Silk
The installation is tracking the real time changes in the market activities related to cryptocurrencies Bitcoin and Litecoin – independent and uncontrolled by any state peer-to-peer payment systems. Constantly changing currency rate of of Bitcoin against major world currencies is influencing the strain of strings in installation and the way the picks are hitting them. The robotic system of the artwork is directed by a computer algorithm: influenced by dynamic changes of data, the installation sounds like a complex sound instrument.

DUMBTYPE

LOVERS
Computer-controlled, five-channel video/sound installation with five video projectors, eight-channel sound system, and slide projectors […] As an image, a pair of lovers often suggests a castle of exclusion. With the sexual liberation of the last few decades, the word now has more to do with physical coupling than with the sublimity of “true love.” AIDS has added a new dimension of wariness to this pairing. The life-size dancers in Lovers are drained of life. Projected onto the black walls of a square room, the naked figures have a spectral quality. Their movements are simple and repetitive. Back and forth, they walk and run with animal grace. Their actions become familiar over time, so that it is a surprise when two of the translucent bodies come together in a virtual embrace. These ostensible lovers–more overlapping than touching–are not physically entwined.

Muti Randolph

Deep Screen
Muti Randolph lives in Rio de Janeiro and studied Visual Communications and Industrial Design at the Pontificia Universisade Católica do Rio de Janeiro. One of the pioneers in computer art, animation and 3d illustration in Brazil, he has been shifting from virtual 3d to real 3d spaces creating visual identities, graphics, illustrations, sets, and interior architecture projects for clients mainly in the entertainment, fashion and technology areas.

Sougwen Chung

愫君
Drawing Operations
Sougwen Chung is an internationally renowned multidisciplinary artist, who uses hand-draw and computer-generated marks to address the closeness between person-to-person and person-to-machine communication. She is a former researcher at MIT Media Lab and current Artist in Resident at Bell Labs and New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York. Her speculative critical practice spans installation, sculpture, still image, drawing, and performance. Drawing Operations Unit: Generation 1 is the 1st stage of an ongoing study of human and robotic interaction as an artistic collaboration.

Myriam Bleau

SOFT REVOLVERS
Soft Revolvers is a music performance for 4 spinning tops built with clear acrylic by the artist. Each spinning top, 10’ in diameter, is associated with an ‘instrument’ or part in an electronic music composition. The tops are equipped with gyroscopes and accelerometers that communicate wirelessly with a computer where the motion data collected (speed,unsteadiness at the end of a spin, acceleration spikes in case of collisions) informs musical algorithms designed in Pure Data. LEDs placed inside the tops illuminate the body of the objects in a precise counterpoint to the music.

Raphael Hillebrand and Christian Mio Loclair

Pow2045
The mathematical construct covers the human body, yet sets a contrast to organic shapes in its accuracy and mechanical precision. This kind of visual contrast can be understood as a visual representation of human computer difference and reveals core features of both – man and machine. A characteristic foundation to design the dialogue of “POW 2045″

ELEVENPLAY x RZM

Discrete Figures
‘Discrete Figures’ unites the performing arts and mathematics in a dramatic exploration of the relationship between the human body and computer generated movement (simulated bodies) born from mathematical analysis. As an additional layer of complexity, the performance piece utilizes drones, A.I., and machine learning in the quest for a new palette of movement to foster undiscovered modes of expressive dance that transcend the limits of conventional human subjectivity and emotional expression.

RYOJI IKEDA

池田亮司
이케다 료지
Редзи Икеда
Transfinite
test pattern [n˚2] presents flickering black and white imagery that floats and convulses in darkness on two screens, one on the floor and another floor to ceiling, in time with a stark and powerful, highly synchronised soundtrack. Through a real–time computer programme, Ikeda’s audio signal patterns are converted into tightly synchronised barcode patterns on the screens. Viewers are literally immersed in the work, and the velocity of the moving images is ultra–fast, some hundreds of frames per second, providing a totally immersive and powerful experience. The work provides a performance test for the audio and visual devices, as well as a response test for the audience’s perceptions.

Kate Cooper

In ‘We Need Sanctuary’ (2016) and ‘Symptom Machine’ (2017), Cooper offers the body up as a contested space for communication and representation. Using computer-generated imagery, situations and characters are brought together to think through politics of exploitative labour, and the somatic experience of image production and distribution. Both works present, scenes of a Computer-generated bodies; both female and non-human who loom at the very edges of the screen. Their hands touch; they move backwards on a conveyor belt; and blood drips from the girl’s mouth while the non-human sweeps the floor behind her.

Driessens & Verstappen

Breed
Breed (1995-2007) is a computer program that uses artificial evolution to grow very detailed sculptures. The purpose of each growth is to generate by cell division from a single cell a detailed form that can be materialised. On the basis of selection and mutation a code is gradually developed that best fulfils this “fitness” criterion and thus yields a workable form. The designs were initially made in plywood. Currently the objects can be made in nylon and in stainless steel by using 3D printing techniques. This automates the whole process from design to execution: the industrial production of unique artefacts.
Computers are powerful machines to harness artificial evolution to create visual images. To achieve this we need to design genetic algorithms and evolutionary programs. Evolutionary programs allow artefacts to be “bred”, rather than designing them by hand. Through a process of mutation and selection, each new generation is increasingly well adapted to the desired “fitness” criteria. Breed is an example of such software that uses Artificial Evolution to generate detailed sculptures. The algorithm that we designed is based on two different processes: cell-division and genetic evolution.

Troika

Reality is not Always Probable
‘Reality is not Always Probable’ is constructed from tens of thousands of colourful dice and is generated, line by line, by manually emulating the rules of a simple computer binary program. Its title references a quote by Jorge Luis Borges and men’s disquiet towards a lack of controllable or predictable events and the belief that complete knowledge is impossible.

Troika

AVA

Ava’ is Troika’s first sculptural manifestation of their exploration of algorithms. ‘Ava’ is the physical result of emergence and self organisation brought about by ‘growing’ a sculpture through the use of a computer algorithm that imitates the emergence of life by which complexity arises from the simplest of things. As such the sculpture probes at the nature of becoming, existence and our strive to understand and replicate the complexities of life.In a landscape where our personal data is a raw material, and where we, humans, have become subordinate spectators of algorithms and a computerised infrastructure, we ask the question how much or little are we capable of influencing our surrounding reality, how much is predetermined, how much is down to chance.

HOLGER LIPPMANN

TriangPaint

Holger Lippmann describes a part of his work as digital painting. What distinguishes digital painting from traditional painting on canvas or paper? We need to distinguish between two categories of digital painting. The first includes works created on the computer with ready-made graphic tools like virtual paint brushes or pens, in something like the way that non-digital pictures are created on paper or canvas. David Hockney’s painting of a sunflower on an i-pad is an example of this. The second category includes works using computer generation, in which programs coded by the artist continually produce new aesthetic concepts as images or animations. Every execution of the software creates new works within the pre-defined boundaries of the system. This process can be called generative painting.

M. Eifler

The Masking Machine
Using a custom wearable computer I can walk around any space wearing the still images now animated by my facial expressions. When seen through the screen hovering in front of my face I wear the images like an avatar, but unlike with the stills on a wall or images online I can reach out from behind the screen to shake hands and talk with viewers.

victoria manganiello

computer 1.0
C O M P U T E R 1.0 seeks to function as a historical lens that shows how our relationship to computing technology has always been fraught with juxtaposed promises of utopian and dystonia futures, while the reality consistently finds itself somewhere in between.
This installation reminds it’s onlookers that society has been grappling with a digital existentialism and the question of ‘are we better off?’ since the birth of programming itself. In this way, C O M P U T E R 1 . 0 is the physical display of the eternally uncertain potential of technology.

Matt Taylor

Motion Graphics Designs
He is working on abstract art, motion graphics, and computer based arts using Cinema 4D and Houdini.

MAREK TOMASIK

Czasem trzeba się otworzyć

A collection of decades worth of hundreds of computers and other electronics, Tomasik’s installation takes on a new life that also harks back to an age-old favorite: Tron. A collection of decades worth of hundreds of computers and other electronics, Tomasik’s installation takes on a new life that also harks back to an age-old favorite: Tron. The walls of the sculpture are a veritable what’s what of the computer-age, and are sure to evoke a sense of nostalgia, even within the most cutting-edge, unwavering gadget geek.

CONLON NANCARROW

コンロン・ナンカロウ
Study for Player Piano No. 37
Nancarrow es uno de los compositores pioneros en este campo, junto con Henry Cowell y Karlheinz Stockhausen, entre otros, que plantearon problemas que hoy abordan los compositores actuales, estimulados por el uso de la computadora.

Muti Randolph

Мути Рэндольф
මුටි රැන්ඩොල්ෆ්
মুটি র‌্যান্ডল্ফ
Generative Installation
Muti Randolph lives in Rio de Janeiro and studied Visual Communications and Industrial Design at the Pontificia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro. One of the pioneers in computer art in Brazil, he has been shifting from virtual 3d to real 3d spaces creating sets, installations and interior architecture projects. In his work he explores the relation of time and space through music and interactive generative video using custom designed software and hardware. His projects are present in the most relevant art, design and architecture publications.

Michael Frank

Beetle in Undergrowth
“I have a strong background in zoology and botany. When I’m rendering realistic or fanciful depictions of flora and fauna, I constantly fall back on my studies and research. Since all of my artwork involves 3D computer imaging, I rely heavily on organic geometry and algorithms that govern natural branching and growth patterns. My art mimics nature in more ways than one.” Michael Frank

QUAYOLA

Captives
Captives is an ongoing series of digital and physical sculptures by Quayola and a contemporary homage to Michelangelo’s unfinished series “Prigioni” (1513-1534) and his technique of “non-finito”. The project explores tensions and equilibrium between form and matter, man-made objects of perfection and complex, chaotic forms of nature. In this series mathematical functions and processes describe computer-generated geological formations, endlessly evolving and morphing into classical figures resulting into life-size ‘unfinished’ sculptures.

Asif Khan

UK Pavilion at the Astana Expo 2017
At the heart of the UK pavilion is a stunning 60 metre panorama depicting a living, universal landscape generated entirely by computer. It captures the relationship between the Sun, the Earth and its climate in incredible detail through virtual day and night. At a stunning 40,000 pixels wide it is the largest project of its kind ever undertaken.

Håkan Lidbo & Max Björverud

FILE SAO PAULO 2017
THE FLOOOR
“The Flooor” is a collaborative music instrument and a social meeting place. 36 sensors under a carpet, connected to a music computer mounted under the floor and loudspeakers mounted in the ceiling.
The patterns printed on the carpet invite people to explore different combinations. 6 groups with different instruments, 6 zones in each group. By standing or dancing on different combinations of the 6 zones, 64 different loops can be triggered.

xenobots

Xenobots – the First “Living Robots”
Researchers used the Deep Green supercomputer cluster and an evolutionary algorithm to design new life-forms that could achieve an assigned task. Then they built them by combining together different biological tissues from Xenopus laevis embryos, hence the name Xenobots.
Credit:A scalable pipeline for designing reconfigurable organisms
Sam Kriegman, Douglas Blackiston, Michael Levin, and Josh Bongard
PNAS, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1910837117

Thierry Mugler

Anatomique Computer
Thierry Mugler, geboren in 1948 in Straatsburg, is een Franse modeontwerper. In zijn jonge jaren was hij balletdanser, maar daarnaast studeerde hij design en maakte hij kleding voor vrienden. Als 20’er verhuist Thierry Mugler naar Parijs waar hij ervaring opdoet als etaleur en stylist in diverse modehuizen. Mugler presenteert zijn eerste collectie in 1973 en 2 jaar later begint hij zijn eigen label.

Marcel·lí Antúnez Roca

Afasia
File Festival – Hypersonica
Afasia is a surreal robotic performance that evolves Greek myths, and brings up the tragedy onto-machinal. Marcel.lí Antúnez Roca (Moià, 1959) is well-known in the international art scene for his mechatronic performances and robotic installations. In the 90′s his vanguardist mechatronic performances combined elements such as Bodybots (body-controlled robots), Systematurgy (interactive narration with computers) and Dresskeleton (the exoskeleton body interface). The themes explored in his work include: the use of biological materials in robotics, telematic control, the expansion of body movements with dresskeletons and microbiological transformations.

MIAO XIAOCHUN

МЯО СЯОЧУНЬ
缪晓春
مياو شياو تشون

The large-scale nine-panel installation, Microcosm, is based on Hieronymus Bosch’s 15th century masterpiece, The Garden of Earthly Delights. Microcosm is an imaginative reinvention of the sumptuous landscape of sin, salvation, and tawdry visions of those who never made it to paradise. The structure and narrative pattern of Bosch’s triptych, such as the architecture of heaven, earth and hell, as well as the basic forms of Bosch’s pictures, have been preserved in Miao Xiaochun’s work. But new digital means and computer technologies have allowed Miao Xiaochun to explore a contemporary visual vocabulary. He abolishes the traditional fixed single-point perspective aesthetic, instead favoring the Chinese tradition of multiple points of view in a single landscape.

DOUG AITKEN

ダグエイケン
道格·艾特肯
sonic fountain

A large round hole—if it were a hot tub, it would be comfortably orgy-sized—has been gouged roughly out of the slick concrete floor of 303 Gallery and filled with milky gray water. Attached to the black duct-work and girders of the ceiling directly above it is a square of pipe surrounded by a speaker array. In the center of the square and at each of its corners is a computer-controlled spigot, dripping, spitting or jetting out, in a rhythmically complex 15-minute cycle, milky water pumped up from the pit in a closed circuit. This is Doug Aitken’s Sonic Fountain.

RICHARD DUPONT

理查德·杜邦
리처드 듀퐁

Manipulating 3-D scans of his own body on the computer, Mr. Dupont then marries digital fabrication methods like rapid prototyping and computer numerically controlled milling with traditional plaster casting and other laborious hand work to make figures that can appear both archaic and futuristic. One of his standing nudes, similar in posture to the Kouros statues from ancient Greece, appears to melt into ripples when viewed on one axis, suggesting the psychic experience of man in the modern world.

PetPunk

Woos
FILE SAO PAULO 2015
ANIMA+
Our friends at PetPunk in Vilnius, Lithuania have created this surrealistic ride through a digital arboreal world in their short film “Woos”. Designed by Gediminas Å iaulys, animated by Andrius Kirvela, the project was commissioned by Computer Arts Magazine and is featured in (and on the cover of) their recent issue #172. Sound by Huma-Huma.

ASIF KHANS

アシフ·カーン
아시프 칸/
Асиф хан
megaface

Valentin Spiess di iart, spiega come funziona il sistema. «Dietro il telone ci sono più di 10mila cilindri telescopici estensibili, sormontati da una sfera con il LED colorato. Quando la persona da ritrarre entra nel gabbiotto per il selfie, vengono scattate 5 immagini che un computer assembla in un rendering 3D. Una volta terminato il disegno, le informazioni vengono inviate al sistema che regola il posizionamento dei cilindri telescopici che si mettono nella posizione giusta per far apparire il viso prescelto». Il sistema è stato costruito in modo da poter essere riutilizzato. Come una specie di Mount Rushmore mobile e per tutti.

Bill Domonkos

Black Hole
gif

Bill Domonkos is a filmmaker, GIF maker and stereoscopist. His work combines 2D and 3D computer animation, special effects, photography, video and manipulated archive film footage. His work has been shown internationally in cinemas, film festivals, galleries and museums.

Thomas Bayrle

Telefon Portrait
Thomas Bayrle (*1937) has been invited to Museum Ludwig’s main gallery to install an overview of his works from the last 40 years that all explore a particular artistic strategy: the loop or looping. While a loop is a kind of ring, the activity of looping refers to the continual repetition of the one and the same motif, whether in Rap music or by constantly running through the same sequence when writing a computer programme. Just such a game between difference and repetition has developed in Thomas Bayrle’s graphic oeuvre

Mari Velonaki

Diamandini
Diamandini is a 155cm tall custom-made humanoid robot incorporating an omni-directional wheeled motion platform; cameras, laser scanners and computers for real-time tracking and installation control. The humanoid robot is being developed through a five year research project between Mari Velonaki and robotics scientists at the Centre for Social Robotics, Australian Centre for Field Robotics, the University of Sydney.

team lab

Universe of Water Particles
Universe of Water Particles is a waterfall created in a computer-simulated environment. A virtual rock is first sculpted and computer-generated water consisting of hundreds of thousands of water particles is then poured onto it. The computer calculates the movement of these particles to produce an accurate waterfall simulation that flows in accordance to physical laws. Next, 0.1 percent of the particles are selected and lines are drawn in relation to them. The sinuousness of the lines depends on the overall interaction among the water particles and forms the magnificent cascade seen on screen.

OCEAN DESIGN RESEARCH

World center
Blending computer-assisted design and experimentation with physics, the collective implements a biological paradigm to develop their morpho-ecological design approach to the architectural project. They are able to do this thanks to the computer-generated design methods they have developed for integrating ecological, topological and structural data.more

Ricardo Barreto and Maria Hsu Rocha

Martela
FILE FESTIVAL
Tactila is an art form whose medium is the sense of touch (tact) which is independent from the all the other ones and has its own intelligence, imagination, memory, perception, and sensation. It is well known that vision and sound have hegemony in arts and in other disciplines. Tactila takes place in time and, therefore, can be recorded and have various forms of notation for subsequent executions. That is why its development became possible only now, thanks to mechatronic and robotic systems which are compatible with machine languages.
The creation of tactile works involves a (tact) composition, which can be made through handmade notation and played on a keyboard or directly on the computer of the tactile machine ( robot ).
Tactile machines can present numerous tactile possibilities through points, vectors, and textures with varying rhythms and intensities, and be run in different extensions and locations of our body.

.

The first tactile machine is called “Martela”. It is a tactile robot comprised of 27 engines subdivided into three squares (3 x 3), i.e., each square has 9 engines. Each engine corresponds to a matrix point, so we have 27 tactile units that allow to touch the user’s body with various intensities.

Ricardo Barreto and Maria Hsu

Avactor (AI)
Thus, we could define computers not only as object-machines for the use of natural subjectivity, but also as machines of artificial subjectivity, in such way that the subject- machines would operate the object-machines, the same happening for automata, robots and digital avatars. However, we observe the need of another element, whose absence prevents artificial subjectivity’s manifestation. In the present moment, rather than an artificial ego or an artificial conscience, in a structuralizing sense, it must have, in a tactical sense, a persona or a personality, in sum, an actor. Without that persona, artificial subjectivity becomes a mere landscape, lacking subjective referential; without that actor, there is not empathy between artificial subjectivity and natural subjectivity. We call that artificial personality: the Avactor.

TOYO ITO

تويو ايتو
伊东丰雄
טויו איטו
伊東豊雄
도요 이토
Tower of Winds
During the day the perforated metal panels that cover the Tower of Winds reflect the city image and make the design appear humble and simple. But during the night, it gets lit up in an ever-changing combination of light intensity and colors. Using computer software, the lighting follows the wind speed and noise levels changing the Tower’s appearance accordingly. The Tower of Winds features more than 1300 light bulbs and 42 flood lights and neon rings (on each floor). The small lights change their colors according to the wind’s noise level and the rings change their intensity according to its speed.
Basically, the Tower of the Winds by Toyo Ito is a wind indicator in a constant relationship with the city and the natural environment, a junction between the two. It is placed at the train station area, welcoming the passengers arriving in Yokohama and its functional role is accommodating another natural element. Surprisingly the Tower of Winds houses the water tanks for the air-conditioning system of the underground mall below. The Tower is not a new construction, but a re-designing of an old concrete tower that already existed there since the ‘60s.

JEREMY BAILEY

ДЖЕРЕМИ БЭЙЛИ
제레미 베일리
ג’רמי ביילי
ジェレミー·ベイリー
Important Portraits

Powered by humor and computer vision, his work wryly critiques the uneasy relationship between technology and the body while playfully engaging the protocols of digital media.

RICARDO BARRETO, MARIA HSU and AMUDI

feel Me tactile interactive bed
File Festival
“feelMe” is a work that for the first time remotely transmits the tactile sensation. Our work provokes the exploration of the sense of touch while promoting the interaction between two people mediated by a machine. The work is constituted of two surfaces, or “beds”: the first one (tactile transmission unit), in which one of the participants, layed down, imprints marks to its surface by pressing it with the weight and movement of the different parts of his/her body; these impressions will be captured and transmitted to the other participant, who lies in the second “bed” (tactile reception unit) and receives them simultaneously in the same positions and in proportional intensities, however, in negative, that is, when the surface in the first bed sinks, it rises in the second one, promoting a touch. The first body touches the second one, and the “beds” may be a few meters or thousands of kilometers apart from each other. Between the bodies, dozens of occult sensors, microcontrollers, engines (lineal actors), computers and a program that orchestrates that tactile communication. We allow the participant to experiment the possibilities of encounter between bodies through the digital world, with a different approach from the one provided by virtual reality. We want to explore the tactile perception separately in its “corporal way”, and only in future works to propose the expansion/extension of multimedia perception with the inclusion of tactile perception.

AL AND AL

The Creator

Decades ago, Turing famously asked, ‘Can machines think?’ and ever since, the notion of computers exceeding human intelligence has transfixed researchers and popular culture alike. For their fantastical Turing interpretation, the directors conjoin Lynchian nightmare with the prophetic themes of J.G. Ballard. Audiences will enter the haunting dream world of the legendary scientist, who gave birth to the computer age. Turing’s binary children embark upon a mystical odyssey to explore their creator’s dream diaries in a quest to discover their origins and destiny in the universe.
Probing the infinite possibilities of technology, AL and AL investigate the shaping forces of fantasy and reality. Having established themselves as pioneering artist filmmakers, they combine performance with computer-generated 3D environments to create dream worlds.