1024 architecture

VORTEX

Architectural fragment made from scaffolding, VORTEX has a raw wood skin highlighted by 12 lines of LED light as many generative and constructive project’s lines. Merging organic materials with new technologies, this hybrid architectural artwork wraps around and embraces the footbridge between the complex’s two buildings, revealing and enhancing the venue’s dynamic energy while working as a live visualizer of energy consumption.VORTEX evolves like a living organism; it breathes, trembles and emits pulses of light created using 1024’s MadMapper software. Manually controlled via a joystick, the structure can be synchronized to music and also displays its location’s energy consumption through a series of illuminated tubes. It ultimately answers to the ambient environment around it, capturing the Darwin Ecosystem Project’s unique energy consumption footprint, and converting it into data that is processed to spawn realtime visuals.
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Olafur Eliasson

Beyond-human resonator
A large ring of bevelled glass, a pane of colour-effect filter glass, and an LED lamp are arranged before the wall, supported by a steel rod. The glass ring refracts, reflects, and disperses the light from the LED to create a painting on the wall with vivid bands of coloured light.

Alex Ekman

COW

Ekman talents extend to the lighting and stage design and his eye for structuring an environment is unerring. There is no set as such, excepting the plaster cow which dangles overhead, but the stage surface has its share of movement as little island-blocks rise up and pits sink down. The extreme tilting of the stage at one point causes unfortunate Bauch to roll, cow-like, almost into the pit. COW has its iconic Ekman moment in the scene that opens on a stage full of swirling dancers in white skirts set in a magical silvery mist. Mikael Karlsson, whose music partners the piece provides a subtle and evocative soundscape. He offers a hint of percussive rhythm picked up by the dancers who launch into an ecstatic dance: a stage full of whirling dervishes, until they collapse exhausted.

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Ekmans Talente erstrecken sich auf die Beleuchtung und das Bühnenbild, und sein Auge für die Strukturierung einer Umgebung ist unfehlbar. Es gibt kein Set als solches, außer der Gipskuh, die über ihnen baumelt, aber die Bühnenoberfläche hat ihren Anteil an Bewegung, wenn kleine Inselblöcke aufsteigen und Gruben sinken. Das extreme Kippen der Bühne an einer Stelle führt dazu, dass der unglückliche Bauch kuhartig fast in die Grube rollt. COW hat seinen legendären Ekman-Moment in der Szene, die auf einer Bühne voller wirbelnder Tänzer in weißen Röcken in einem magischen silbernen Nebel beginnt. Mikael Karlsson, dessen Musikpartner das Stück ist, bietet eine subtile und eindrucksvolle Klanglandschaft. Er bietet einen Hauch von perkussivem Rhythmus, der von den Tänzern aufgenommen wurde, die einen ekstatischen Tanz beginnen: eine Bühne voller wirbelnder Derwische, bis sie erschöpft zusammenbrechen.

 

DORETTE STURM

FILE SAO PAULO 2017
THE BREATHING CLOUD
“The Breathing Cloud” is a monumental floating organism. The work transforms a space by its motion, light, and rhythmic breathing. With this light art the phrase “let a room come to life” gets a new meaning. The clouds skin looks fragile and soft, and the movements are rhythmic, yet random, so the whole room feels like a living being. The technology is designed so that the strong LED modules and the mechanism support the pervasive breathing. It gets physically bigger and smaller and embraces with its bright light space.

Anish Kapoor

Destierro
Destierro – which translates from Spanish into ‘exile’[…] features three installations that see Kapoor veering back towards his signature style of work with pigmented powder. However, unlike his previous work, the three pieces on display in Argentina shine a spotlight on the global migration crisis marking a change in direction for Kapoor who has, up until recently, shied away from making political work.

CHRISTIAN BOLTANSKI

基督教波尔坦斯基
בולטנסקי
クリスチャン·ボルタンスキー
Кристиан Болтански

Homage

R.I.P 1944-2021

Preoccupied with collective memory, mortality, and the passage of time, Christian Boltanski creates paintings, sculptures, films, and mixed-media installations that approach these themes in a range of styles, symbolic to direct. Boltanski often makes metaphorical use of found objects, as in No Man’s Land (2010), an enormous pile of discarded jackets set to the soundtrack of thousands of human heartbeats, suggesting the anonymity, randomness, and inevitability of death. In Monuments (1985), electrical bulbs cast a seemingly bittersweet light on pictures of child holocaust victims. Describing his interest in personal histories, Boltanski has said, “What drives me as an artist is that I think everyone is unique, yet everyone disappears so quickly. […] We hate to see the dead, yet we love them, we appreciate them.”

Keith Lam

Heliocentric
“Heliocentric” is a lighting sculpture represents the movement of universe. It dialogues to its history (from temple to school to creative hub) and its functionality (welcoming people connect and learn the universe)
With the lighting arrangement, kinetic movement of the light, and the performer , it shows the relationship between universe, knowledge and human.

Hybe

Light Tree: Interactive Dan Flavin
HYBE’s Light Tree: Interactive Dan Flavin re-illuminates the minimalist fluorescent light tubes of Dan Flavin from the 1960s, through digital technology. Experimenting with light and its effect, Flavin explored artistic meaning in relationships between light, situation, and environment. The readymade fluorescent light fixtures he used created space divided and adjusted by light and composition, offering a newly structured space with light. HYBE’s work expands the logic of Flavin by reinforcing the physical property of light through interactive media. It presents an escape from traditional lighting, as light and color changes when touched by viewers. Lighting here is divided into front and back, and colors are programmed to maintain complementary colors. The front lighting constantly interacts with colors on a back wall through visual contrast and mixture. A random change and diffusion of light with the involvement of viewers provokes tension extending and segmenting space, turning space into a forum for emotional perceptual experience.

daan roosegaarde

waterlicht

Dubbed “the northern light of the Netherlands” by Studio Roosegaarde, the Waterlicht installation is designed to create the impression of a “virtual flood”.The waving lines of light spread across 1.6 hectares bear a resemblance to the northern lights – the natural phenomenon created when charged particles enter the Earth’s atmosphere – when viewed from underneath.

Gustav Mahler

MAHLER

KEN RUSSELL

Russell had long been an admirer of Mahler’s music. He said he based the film on “the rondo form in music where you present the theme and follow it with variations, then return to the theme and so on. My theme was the composer‘s last train journey before he died. During the journey we flash back to incidents in his life, the variations on the theme as it were. They vary from passion to comedy. Like the scherzos from his symphonies some of the scenes are pretty grotesque, too.”
cinema full

Lebbeus Woods

The Light Pavilion
The Light Pavilion by Lebbeus Woods in collaboration with Christoph a. Kumpusch, in the Raffles City complex in Chengdu, China, by Steven Holl Architects.
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The Light Pavilion is designed to be an experimental space, one that gives us the opportunity to experience a type of space we haven’t experienced before. Whether it will be a pleasant or unpleasant experience; exciting or dull; uplifting or frightening; inspiring or depressing; worthwhile or a waste of time, it is not determined by the fulfillment of our familiar expectations, never having encountered such a space before. We shall simply have to go into the space and pass through it. That is the most crucial aspect of its experimental nature, and we – its transient inhabitants – are experimentalists.Lebbeus Woods and Christoph a. Kumpusch

ANOUK WIPPRECHT

PANGOLIN DRESS

The Pangolin Scales Project demonstrates a 1.024 channel BCI (Brain-Computer Interface) that is able to extract information from the human brain with an unprecedented resolution. The extracted information is used to control the Pangolin Scale Dress interactively into 64 outputs.The dress is also inspired by the pangolin, cute, harmless animals sometimes known as scaly anteaters. They have large, protective keratin scales covering their skin (they are the only known mammals with this feature) and live in hollow trees or burrows.As such, Pangolins and considered an endangered species and some have theorized that the recent coronavirus may have emerged from the consumption of pangolin meat.Wipprecht’s main challenge in the project’s development was to not overload the dress with additional weight. She teamed up 3D printing experts Shapeways and Igor Knezevic in order to create an ‘exo-skeleton like dress-frame (3mm) that was light enough to be worn but sturdy enough to hold all the mechanics in place

ROBERT HENKE


光正在使用高精度激光在屏幕上绘制连续的抽象形,并与声音完美同步。强烈的光线与完全的黑暗形成对比,缓慢的动作和微小细节的演化与强而有力的手势一样重要。结果既是古朴的又是未来主义的。新兴的模式为许多可能的解释留出了空间。象形文字,一种未知语言的符,建筑图纸,数据点之间的连接或类似Tron的早期视频游戏放大了1000

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Light

Light is using high-precision lasers to draw continuous abstract shapes on the screen, perfectly synchronized with the sound. Intense light contrasts with total darkness, and slow movements and the evolution of small details are as important as strong gestures. The result is both quaint and futuristic. Emerging models leave room for many possible explanations. Hieroglyphs, symbols in an unknown language, architectural drawings, connections between data points, or early video games like Tron are magnified 1,000 times.

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Lumière

La lumière utilise des lasers de haute précision pour dessiner des formes abstraites continues sur l’écran, parfaitement synchronisées avec le son. La lumière forte contraste avec l’obscurité totale, le ralenti et l’évolution des petits détails sont aussi importants que les gestes forts. Le résultat est à la fois pittoresque et futuriste. Les modèles émergents laissent place à de nombreuses explications possibles. Les hiéroglyphes, les symboles dans une langue inconnue, les dessins d’architecture, les connexions entre les points de données ou les premiers jeux vidéo comme Tron sont agrandis 1 000 fois.

SQUAREPUSHER

Ufabulum
Soundcrash are proud to present the electronic music innovator that is Squarepusher! Beginning his sonic experiments in 1994, Squarepusher constantly strives to push the boundaries and limits of electronic music. In May 2012 Squarepusher unleashed his latest musical venture ‘Ufabulum’, an album of music generated purely from digital programming, ensuring his influence within today’s global music electronic scene is as vital as ever. For his first headline ‘Ufabulum’ album show in London, Squarepusher will take over the historic music hall Hackney Empire with his largest ever light-show to date! This is a unique opportunity to witness one of electronic music’s pioneers in an extraordinary setting.

Masaki Fujihata

Orchisoid

“Mobility, technological invention, and artistic invention “It’s not just about putting new media into art, or even making new media art. It is about making new media as an artist, about being an artist in new media. Therefore, if it is not only a question of renewing art by injecting it with new means, new tools, new subjects, it may be a matter of shifting its borders to the point of considering experiments, technological inventions, such as art-related events, as part of the artistic project ”. In my opinion, here is how to re-found art and breathe new life into it for years to come! Fujihata’s work leads us to think of Art as “technical conduct”. In this conduct, technique is not instrumentalised, it is therefore freed from having to serve FOR something, it does not have to be effaced in front of what it serves. But this notion is very “fragile” as Pierre-Damien Huyghe points out to us. Indeed, if the technique “is no longer used for” it is no longer “necessary”. We must therefore consider that what is not necessary is precisely what is useful. Highlighting the usefulness in a technique without going through a notion of service is precisely what is at stake in Masaki Fujiata’s artistic position. In his work, it is about exploring the possibilities of a group of techniques so that they do not end up in the use where they are usually agreed. At the heart of Fujihata’s work we are dealing with techniques rich in possibilities. The artist has an artistic conduct which does not seek the means to do something with these techniques but which seeks to discover them. The artist positions himself as a discoverer making both learned and humorous attempts … “Jorane Rest

asif khan

Radiant Lines

“People are naturally drawn to light, It’s intuitive. What I want people to feel is a sense of familiarity even though they haven’t seen it before. There’s a sense that it’s pseudo-natural, which I think is why people are drawn to it. It uses crazy technology – there’s a lot of stuff happening – but it doesn’t show it and the result is more humanistic and almost biological.” asif khan

Klaus Obermaier, Kyle McDonald and Daito Manabe

Transcranial

奥地利多媒体艺术家兼编舞克劳斯·奥伯迈尔(Klaus Obermaier)在舞蹈和工艺艺术领域进行不断的实验,与媒体艺术研究中的其他两个参考文献联手,日本人Daito Manabe(现在是该音乐节的常客),而美国的Kyle McDonald也出席了本次艺术节。 Jardin des Plantes的装置Light Leaks。发表演艺术中各种形式的互动,“跨颅”是一项合作研究与创造项目的一部分,在这里,表演是工作的阶段之一。经颅尤其涉及电磁刺激及其对神经元的影响。在外部命令的冲动下(如Face Visualizer中的Daito Manabe所实践的那样),身体和大脑似乎受到功能失调,异常和不良行为的影响,而正是从数字技术中借来的这三个要素是其中一。

BREAKFAST

Empire State
Empire State is a kinetic A.I. artwork visualizing the current time-of-day and weather at the Empire State Building in New York. The imagery was created from running a sketch through an Artificial Intelligence model to generate two variations on the image, each printed on each side of the discs. The piece visualizes the current time-of-day and weather by animating clouds, rain, light/shadow, by rotating sections of discs to the reverse side. When one walks up to the piece, they will see their image reflected back at them, further embedding them to the connection between where they are and the current state in NYC.

JEONGMOON CHOI

Three-Dimensional UV Thread Installations
El artista Jeongmoon Choi utiliza la luz y el hilo para crear instalaciones que juegan con los aspectos de la perspectiva y la ilusión. Con reminiscencias de algo producido en un espectáculo de luces láser, sus campos tridimensionales formados por líneas lumínicas, están instalados en un espacio ultravioleta para crear entornos interactivos.

Laura Scozzi

Jean-Philippe Rameau
Les Indes Galantes

The first merit of this new production, streaming with intelligence, is that Laura Scozzi and Christophe Rousset have read Fuzelier’s verses deeply. And of Rameau, we must add, so much the composer, perpetually dissatisfied with his poets, harassed them word for word, when he did not take up the pen himself. In addition to lines which, like his contemporary Marivaux, seem to have been invented instantly, Fuzelier has built a dialectical finesse between peace and war, joy and hatred, pleasure and violence, the state of Nature and the state of society. The Gallant Indies according to Laura Scozzi are not a gigantic burst of joy. On the contrary, they reveal a perpetual and restless balance between shadow and light and are a look, less consensual but true and human, on the Age of Enlightenment. Here is a startling ideological reversal, without any forcing: Laura Scozzi has simply revealed the implicit nature of a libretto, so far read superficially.

Maurizio Bolognini

SMSMS-SMS Mediated Sublime

CIMs-Collective Intelligence Machines

“In 2000, I began to connect some of these computers to the mobile phone network (SMSMS-SMS Mediated Sublime, and CIMs-Collective Intelligence Machines). This enabled me to make interactive and multiple installations, connecting various locations.
In this case the flow of images was made visible by large-scale video-projections and the members of the audience were able to modify their characteristics in real time, by sending new inputs to the system from their own phones. This was done in a similar way to certain applications used in electronic democracy. What I had in mind was art which was generative, interactive and public.”

Pierre Boulez

Répons

“Oh yes, there is a metre, slightly irregular on one level but very regular on another. There are so many irregular things in this piece that at one point you need to have a regular metre as you say – a bass and a regular pulse anyway – but also a series of harmonies which are all symmetrical. The harmony always gives this impression of something followed by its inverse; there is always a centre – an axis of symmetry. This symmetry of harmony corresponds in harmonic terms to a regular metre. This is very important. There are three types of time. That which is chaotic and irregular such as you have in the beginning (in the speed I mean). Then you have, in the speed, the very regular rapid repeated notes – always in semiquavers. Finally at the end there is a regularity, a kind of metre – but with much ornamentation. The ornamentation is in fact very irregular, but the metre itself is very regular”. Pierre Boulez

German Ermics

Ombré Glass Chair

“German Ermics is a Latvian designer who has recently presented to the public his splendid Ombré Glass Chair, which embodies the perfect tribute to To Shiro Kuramata and his iconic Glass Chair (1976), considered one of the iconic furniture designers of the 20th century. The keyword of his creation is “simplicity” combined with the transparency and the apparent lightness of the material, the result is an elegant minimal work.Another peculiarity of the chair is that it was manufactured with a new industrial product, the Photobond 100, welded without the use of screws or mounting-reinforcements, thus eliminating any superficiality.” Claudia Fuggetti

BERENIKE CORCUERA

Purple Light

À travers des photographies kiriliennes de son aura capturées pour la première fois en 2014, elle a commencé à étudier le champ aurique électromagnétique du corps humain:L’aura est une ellipse métaphysique 3D composée de 7 bandes de corps de lumière autour du corps physique. L’énergie de l’aura est transmise vers / depuis le corps via 7 centres d’énergie – des chakras («roue» en sanskrit) situés le long de la colonne vertébrale du corps humain, ce qui a inspiré sa collection d’études supérieures.Berenike traduit la légèreté dans toute sa collection, en dédiant 6 looks aux centres spécifiques et à leur couche de corps léger.

A.I.L.O it pronounces Hello

Art and Light
Exploration sensorielle. Tout part de la ligne, comme une envie d’infini. Composition géométrique de lignes lumineuses projetées sur les miroirs et le mur. En partant de la ligne la plus épurée jusqu’à une recherche d’accumulation en travaillant la profondeur et la perte de repère. Le travail sonore créé à partir des vibrations lumineuses nous enveloppe et joue sur nos propres resonances. Interaction avec les surfaces réfléchissantes qui transcendent

James Bridle

The Right to Flight

A Londres, l’installation aérienne «The Right to Flight» de l’artiste britannique James Bridle explore la notion de surveillance depuis les airs et revient sur les utopies dévoyées des premiers aérostats.
Dans le ciel limpide de Londres flotte depuis le mois de juin un étrange ballon noir. Localisé dans le quartier populaire de Peckham, dans le sud de la ville, il est arrimé au niveau supérieur d’un parking désaffecté, vaisseau brutaliste dont les deux derniers étages hébergent depuis huit ans Bold Tendencies, un projet artistique estival, ainsi qu’un bar de plein air très couru avec une vue stupéfiante sur la skyline londonienne.Connu pour ses projets sur les drones ou son blog de recherche The New Aesthetic, James Bridle, né en 1980, a aussi posé sur le toit du parking une station de recherche expérimentale explorant l’histoire des aérostats, via des ateliers, des conférences et projections. Constituée de trois modules circulaires, fabriqués à partir de silos de grains lestés par des sacs de sable, l’architecture évoque tout à la fois les hangars des compagnies aériennes et la maison en kit Dymaxion de Buckminster Füller

 

AURÉLIEN BORY

PLEXUS
Aurélien Bory is a Toulouse-based choreographer working at the intersection of dance, circus and visual art. In Plexus, he encloses the Japanese dancer Kaori Ito in a forest of tensioned vertical cables. It’s as if she’s in a transparent cuboid cage. We can see her, but her image is blurred by the shimmer of Arno Veyrat’s lighting as it moves across the cables. Ito strains against these confines, writhing, flailing and hurling herself against the cables. Every sound is hugely amplified, so with her every movement we are assailed by a high-tensile jangling and groaning. At intervals she subjects her environment to furious challenge, racing backwards and forwards within the limited inner space so that the cage rocks on its axis. At other times she positions herself between the cables so that they bear her weight, and hangs there like an exhausted insect, faintly articulating her limbs.

EVE BAILEY

Intuit
The movements of one individual effect the balance of the piece so greatly that the other person must move to balance the sculpture. ‘Our bodies are constantly adapting and bending to the configurations of buildings and the designs of transportation. In recent drawings, urban blueprints fuse with human anatomical representation… I emphasize on the ideas of flexibility and lightness. The machines I build serve to express the elegance of a gesture, a finite moment of equilibrium.’ Eve Bailey

Ai-Da

“Poem for an artificial intelligence”

the sun is a beautiful thing

in silence is drawn

between the trees

only the beginning of light

this realm of rain

grey sky and cloud

it’s quite and peaceful

safe allowed

And, arguably, worse:

I am a coal-truck

by a broken heart

I have no sound

the sound of my heart

I am not

RICHARD BOX

FIELD

Die Installation ‘Field’ wurde erstellt, indem in Tormarton, South Gloucestershire, 1.301 wiedergewonnene 58-Watt-Leuchtstoffröhren mit einem Abstand von 100 mm in die Erde in gleichem Abstand von ihren Nachbarn auf einer Fläche von 3.600 m2 unter einer 440-kV-Freileitung errichtet wurden. VEREINIGTES KÖNIGREICH. In der Abenddämmerung sichtbar zu werden, beleuchtete das elektromagnetische Feld, das von den Stromleitungen oben auf dem Weg zur Erde ausgeht, die Röhren. Field” verwendete ein alltägliches Glasobjekt, um ein hochgradig interaktives Kunstwerk zu erstellen, das auf vielen verschiedenen Ebenen erfolgreich war. Das Stück machte auf dramatische Weise auf das Vorhandensein des elektromagnetischen Feldes aufmerksam und machte das Unsichtbare sichtbar.

Maria Guta and Adrian Ganea

Cyberia

Performance & live computer generated simulation

A postmodern fairytale, Cyberia takes place somewhere in a cold distant East, stretching between and endless imaginary realm and a vast physical space. It is a westwards journey towards a promised future with no arrival and no return. There is no here or there, only a twilight zone between a departure point and a simulated destination. Between digital video projections and a physical setting, using the mechanics of a video-game engine with a motion capture suit, Cyberia is the simulation of an endless pre-climax state where a performer and a CG avatar dance as one to the rhythms of an imaginary West. In a world oversaturated by digital data –mysticism and paranormal are as popular as ever. Emerging technologies are increasingly incorporated in a form of postmodern spiritualism, as Arthur C. Clarke points out: “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

Kimchi and Chips

Difference and Repetition
The title references Deleuzes thesis ‘Difference and Repetition’ – his attempt to understand reality without referring to identities. The artists aim to ‘unidentify’ the audience – to criticize the bubbles of reality which technology has helped us to build around ourselves. By allowing ourselves to remove our identity occasionally, we can better understand the thoughts of those we disagree with and therefore better work together to build a combined reality. Difference (in both senses) is generated by the motion control system which continuously changes the pose of the mirrors relative to the viewer. This movement disrupts space itself, creating a transformation similar to that of a Lorentz transformation when one travels close to the speed of light. This causes space itself to compress, twist and break, giving the viewer a tool for observing the non-absolute nature of time.

Jeanne Gang

American Museum of Natural History
Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation
“We uncovered a way to vastly improve visitor circulation and museum functionality, while tapping into the desire for exploration and discovery that is so emblematic of science and also such a big part of being human. Upon entering the space, natural daylight from above and sight lines to various activities inside invite movement through the Central Exhibition Hall on a journey toward deeper understanding. The architectural design grew out of the museum’s mission.” Jeanne Gang

LAb[au]

What hath God wrought?
The title of the installation is a line from the Book of Numbers in early modern English. It was the first message transmitted by telegraph in 1844, the first communication technology on the basis of electricity and binary coding. The artwork is fed by the 100 most used words in Thomas More’s book ‘Utopia’, feeding the correspondence between a series of telegraphs. The telegraphs translate the words into sound and light. Written rolls of paper drift to the floor. Slowly but surely, mistakes slip into the closed system and the meaning of the words alters. The Morse orchestra deals with the rationalism of the Renaissance and its belief in progress and posits by contrast an aesthetic of a self-regulating system in which the fault rules and defect becomes beauty.

Thom Kubli & Prof. Hiroshi Ishii

Orbiting
Orbiting features floating, machine-generated sculptures. The 3-D-printed objects — made from an ultra-light material — are injected with helium and released into the air as they become buoyant. As the ascending sculptures rise toward the ceiling, they enter the flow of a thermal stream and begin their gentle orbit. While floating, these ethereal objects participate in a continuously changing series of celestial movements.

Pangenerator

The shimmering pulse
The installation consists of 451 independent modules arranged in a form of hexagon – each module reacts to light it receives by spinning iridescent disc that spreads out thanks to centrifugal force, creating a unique kinetic “physical pixel”. That field of shimmering pixels is combined with light projection mapped onto the installation surface to visualize real-time data of the traffic in the Shenzhen area – the hexagon is divided into sections corresponding the 9 city districts. As a result the public can observe and interact with the object that represents the pulse of life of the city in an artful and unexpected way.

Schweigman & en Cocky Eek

Spectrum
How intensely can you experience colour? Colour as a phenomenon which you don’t just see, but which totally absorbs… Spectrum is a spatial installation that makes colour tactile and tangible.
Fall backwards into a black hole and reawaken in an infinite spectrum. An immersive experience which will give you a whole new perspective on the coloured cycles of our everyday light. Following Blaas and Curve, Spectrum completes a triptych centred on white space, each piece created with spatial designer Cocky Eek in collabaration with Schweigman&. In Blaas you crawl through an inflatable balloon; in Curve you enter an endlessly spiralling tunnel. Spectrum starts by asking: how can we make the colour physically tangible?

Terreform ONE

PLUG-IN ECOLOGY: Urban Farm Pod with Agronomy
The Plug-In Ecology; Urban Farm Pod is a “living” cabin for individuals and urban nuclear families to grow and provide for their daily vegetable needs. It is an interface with the city, potentially touching upon urban farming, air quality levels, DIY agronomy techniques in test tubes, algal energy production, and bioluminescent light sources, to name a few possibilities. It can be outfitted with a number of optional systems to adapt to different locations, lighting conditions, and habitation requirements. While agricultural food sources are usually invisible in cities such as New York, the pod archetype turns the food system itself into a visible artifact, a bio-informatic message system, and a functional space.

Liam Young & John Cale

Loop 60 Hz: Transmissions from the Drone Orchestra
A flock of autonomous DJI copters are programmed as aerial dancers and are mounted with specially engineered wireless speakers to broadcast the instruments of the band. Other copters are dressed in elaborate costumes to disguise their form and reflect light across the audience below. Against a score of original compositions and selected tracks from Cale’s seminal career this collaboration with Young imagines the possibilities of the drones as emerging cultural objects. If these technologies are no longer unseen objects overhead, or propelled along classified flight paths but brought into close and intimate relations with us then how might we see them differently. When their transmission fades, when the drones lose their signal and without their protocols for terror and surveillance, do they drop from the sky, do they fall in love or do the drones drift endlessly, forever on loop.

Robert Breer

Float
The Floats – or floating sculptures – that Robert Breer took up producing again at the end of the 1990s, emerged in 1965. The word “float” meaning something floating – a marker, fishing float or buoy – and which also describes those carnival vehicles whose pretend wheels give them the appearance of floating above the tarmac, enabled Robert Breer to apply this principle to works of a new genre. Primary shapes, neutral colours and, for the most recent, an industrial aspect, the Floats were then made with polystyrene, foam, painted plywood, and, more latterly, out of fibreglass. At first glance, these simple structures appear immobile. In fact, they are moving, imperceptibly, within the space they inhabit. Motorised and on mini-rollers – which raise them slightly above ground, giving them an air of weightlessness – they glide unbeknown to the visitor, following random paths that are interrupted by the slightest obstacle that they encounter.

EMILIJA ŠKARNULYTĖ

Mirror Matter
In the neutrino observatory rendered in Mirror Matter, slow panning movement gives a sense of the immensity of the nearly 13,000 photo-multipliers that inhabit this strange vessel – their ‘eyes’ engineered to watch light. Another frame depicts the Hadron Collider at CERN; its architecture envisioned through lidar scans, producing a dynamic, transparent imprint in three dimensions. Described as a vision that flows through the body, it is imagined by Škarnulytė as alien archaeological vision’ with the ability to see through, and as the experience of sight farthest from the human realm. Through simultaneous perspectives, the constant surveying motion that weaves a continues thread through each video narrative, and the immersion generated by the reflective black ceiling, the viewer is imparted with this panoptical mode of perception.

Ramy Fischler & Cyril Teste

Exformation, an interactive installation inspired by the concept of “exformation,” was developed for a composition by Jesper Nordin performed by the Diotima string quartet and combines musical, luminous and colorimetric scores. Around the musicians, positioned on a technically equipped stage, three aluminium-edged cubes with LEDs mounted on circular rails move and angle their light in keeping with an algorithmic programme based on analysis of the spectrum, timbre and intensity of the music. This sensitive object becomes a total composition, a poetic, digital entity responding to the work played at its centre.

RYUJI NAKAMURA

中村竜治
류지 나카무라
РЮДЗИ НАКАМУРА
spring (invisible 3D screen)

Japanese architect Ryuji Nakamura has constructed a nearly invisible 3D screen that only reveals itself in the presence of light.  This installation ‘spring’ was part of the “Neoreal in the Forest” exhibit at this year’s Milan Design Week

sarah oppenheimer

N-01

The artist creates an unprecedented visuospatial system that transforms the historical museum and its viewers alike.Visitors are kindly invited to touch and move the black metal and glass elements of the artwork.The built environment is inhabited through an array of inputs and outputs. Our bodies set in motion invisible chains of cause and effect. Enter a room: lights turn on. Turn a handle:a door opens. This relay is modulated through system controllers, devices programmed to respond to moving bodies and aural commands. Buried within walls, floors and ceilings, building networks are a black box.

Shilpa Gupta

For, In Your Tongue, I Cannot Fit
‘For, in your tongue, I cannot fit,’ gives voice to 100 poets who have been jailed through time for their writing or their beliefs. The haunting work highlights the fragility and vulnerability of our right to freedom of expression today—and the bravery of those who struggle to resist. Visitors will encounter 100 microphones suspended over 100 metal rods, each piercing a verse of poetry. Over the course of an hour, each microphone in turn recites a fragment of the poets’ words, spoken first by a single voice then echoed by a chorus which shifts across the space.

Andrea Polli

Particle Falls

Particle Falls is a large-scale, real-time visualization of air-quality data.On a background of falling blue light, spots of bright, fiery color emerge and crackle, representing the presence of fine particulate matter, as detected by a nearby air monitor. Fewer bright spots over the falls mean fewer particles in the air.Particle Falls draws our attention to the invisible particles that surround us and that may affect our health. While the visible smog that plagued many U.S. urban centers decades ago has been mitigated by technology and regulatory measures, microscopic threats to our air continue to exist and often go unnoticed. Particle Falls is one way we can learn more about the quality of air around us.

Wolfgang Buttress

The Hive  Kew Gardens

“The proposal involves the idea of ​​’temporary’ in an interesting way. It uses the temporary aspect of the installation to carefully engage with the purpose and short and long-term needs of the land,” said the judges. Originally designed for the Expo 2015 from Milan, The Hive was transferred to Kew Gardens, in central London, for two years, where it was part of an event space. Designed to give visitors a glimpse into the life of working bees, the pavilion was built with 169,300 individual aluminum components equipped with hundreds of LED lights. As the meadow surrounding the structure grows, several species of plants begin to flourish, bringing with them the sounds of real bees that enhance the multi-sensory experience of the pavilion.The aesthetic and symbolic installation represents its namesake, with the aim of showing visitors the importance of protecting the honeybee.

Phillip K. Smith

10 Columns
His newest work, simply titled “10 Columns,” inaugurates Bridge Projects by transforming the 7,000-square-foot exhibition space in Hollywood into a synthetic sunrise/sunset[…] Smith has programmed the light-emitting diodes in each panel to cycle through an hourlong sequence of colors. The palette is space-age baroque its primaries and secondaries endowed with the artificially enhanced zing of exquisitely mixed tertiaries.

MASAKI FUJIHATA

beyond pages

The data projector loads images of a leather bound tome onto a tablet which a light pen activates, animating the objects named in it – stone, apple, door, light, writing. The soundscore immaculately emulates the motion of each against paper, save for the syllabic glyphs of Japanese script, for which a voice pronounces the selected syllable. Stone and apple roll and drag across the page, light illuminates a paper-shaded desklamp; door opens a video door in front of where you read, a naked infant romping, lifesize and laughing, in.

guillaume marmin & frederic marolleau

HARA
Guillaume marmin and Frédéric marolleau convey spiritual essence through visual abstraction in ‘hara’, an audio-visual collaboration for the 7th chromatic festival in montréal, québec. ‘Hara’, the anatomical home of energy according to japanese custom, is explored by various means. Music and light move through states of tension and calm, creating for each visitor a unique contemplative experience.

Eliška Sky

WOMANEROES

“Eliška Sky’s tribe of ‘womaneroes’ stand bold and bright, their bodies and heads adorned in vibrant shapes, colours, and textures. Beneath the wigs and paint are women of all ages, shapes and ethnicities, photographed with a large-format camera to capture every detail, rough or smooth, with the intention for the images to eventually be printed and exhibited life-size. “It started as visual play, but transformed into a series that challenges depictions of women’s bodies,” explains the London-based Czech photographer. “In light of my own experience of working in the fashion industry, I felt the need to portray the body in new ways and forms, with an element of playfulness and humour in opposition to western media advertising”.” Marigold Warner

Daan Roosegaarde

WINDLICHT
WINDLICHT is a artwork by Roosegaarde which shows the beauty of green energy by connecting windmill blades with lines of light. Special software and tracking technology detect the windmill blades rotating at 280 kilometres per hour. Visitors can tune into radio canal WINDLICHT FM 105.3 FM to hear the stories behind the artwork. WINDLICHT creates the missing link between the Dutch and the beauty of our new landscape.

Klaus Obermaier

克劳斯奥伯迈尔
the concept of … (here and now)

In front of a giant screen, two dancers interact with a cohort of cameras… Their movements are captured by infra-red sensors and projected onto the screen, whereby their bodies become the canvas on which new images take shape. The result is a shifting kaleidoscope of strange, living, quasi-mathematical visual worlds which sometimes seem to be emanating or even escaping from the dancers’ bodies. “Who decides which movement to make: the man or the machine?” Blurring the line between the real and the virtual, Klaus Obermaier loves to subsume his performers’ bodies and physicality in a disconcerting digital universe. With his latest creation, the choreographer/artist has taken a bold new step. He has constructed a system of projectors and infra-red sensor-cameras, trained upon the movements of two dancers. The performers thus find themselves thrown headlong into a living, moving graphical universe: their movements are projected onto the screen, but at the same time their bodies are illuminated by more projected images. This is a true artistic performance, pushing well beyond the frontiers of a standard dance recital, or even a contemporary dance show. A corporeal, temporal performance. A choreography which makes subtle use of its raw materials, deftly combining lights, video, perspectives and the real-time power of bodily movement.

alexander lehmann

Hybris – Garbage Truck
Inspired by chaos theory and non-linear dynamics, Hybris invested a few years sitting in the studio to create his debut, and the results of such an amount of time invested in it stand out at first glance because not only has his head blown of how much ordinary human being crosses his music in addition to blowing the minds of Noisia themselves (who surely do not have to be very easy people to surprise), it has also made UKF (the largest d & b / idm community the world) highlight his first single as a piece worthy of freezing in time and that somehow revitalizes and reinvents the d & b that in Hybris Garbage Truck has not only found a new form of expression with what you hear but also with what you see with his precise and perfectly timed video made by Alexander Lehmann.

Lisa Rovner

‘Sisters with Transistors’, a documentary about the pioneers of electronic music

This November, a new documentary dedicated to the pioneers of electronic music will see the light under the name ‘Sisters with Transistors’. The feature centers around the work of figures such as Suzanne Ciani, Delia Derbyshire, Laurie Spiegel, and Clara Rockmore.
The feature aims to reveal a unique struggle for emancipation and restore the central role of women in the history of music and society in general.
‘We, women, were especially attracted to electronic music when the possibility of a woman composing was itself controversial. Electronics allow us to make music that others can listen to without having to be taken seriously by the male-dominated establishment’, says the director of the piece.

Marshmallow Laser Feast

NEST

Inspired by Homer’s Odyssey
Loosely based on Homer’s The Odyssey, Marshmallow Laser Feast’s light installation lit the primary performance space within the chapel’s hazy internal dome. Grid-like projections crossed with mobile structures (designed by the architectural practice Studio Weave) as agile bodies crept over, in and through the many lit towers and surfaces. This first act was seen by the audience from the left and right balconies above. The second act, down flights of rope-lined staircases in the concrete basement, was more disorienting, lit only with triangular neon tubing and an eerie glow that seeped from an open door. The style of dance, in keeping with the more rapid and percussive score, by Canadian composer Christopher Mayo and electronic music composer / performer Anna Meredith, confronted the audience and was staged without boundaries dividing the dancers (some of whom were in street clothes) and viewers.

Wayne McGregor

Atomos

Atomos grows out of the smallest unit of matter. Bodies, movement, film, sound and light are atomised into miniature shards of intense sensation.Ten incredible dancers perform the unique style of Wayne McGregor – sculptural, rigorous, jarring and hauntingly beautiful. McGregor is accompanied by a team of sensational artists including longtime collaborators lighting designer Lucy Carter and filmmaker Ravi Deepres, and neo-classical ambient composers A Winged Victory For The Sullen.

NILS VÖLKER

Two Hundred and Seventy
Through the combination of an everyday material with precise technology the mixed media installation fills the whole columned hall from the 19th century with its fluid movement and peculiar sound. Concavely arranged and floating above the spectators heads the form of the artwork seems to pass the skylight like the sun’s rays. Subdivided into nine columns, the nearly 70 square metres large piece of art follows a site-specific choreography determined by a program. Its moving surface is made from 270 white garbage bags, being inflated and deflated. In this way shapes and the boundaries of the installation itself start to dissolve. “Two Hundred and Seventy“ is the first installation with an undisguised view behind the scenes and onto the origin of the wavelike and organic movement: 1080 fans, lots of cables and 45 circuit boards

Robyn Moody

Wave Interference
Any image can be made to elicit any emotional response based on the soundtrack that accompanies it. This is a fact that filmmakers have exploited for years; a soundtrack can make an image cheerful, or nostalgic, or (in a minor key) induce feelings of melancholy or dread. Wave Interference combines a beautiful and elegant vision of a wave of light with a gradually changing melancholic soundtrack;

Akram Khan

Until the Lions
In this partial adaptation of poet Karthika Naïr’s book Until the Lions: Echoes from the Mahabharata, an original reworking of the epic Mahabharata, Khan uses kathak and contemporary dance to tell the tale of Amba, a princess abducted on her wedding day and stripped of her honour, who invokes the gods to seek revenge. In an epic theatrical piece, Khan explores the notion and the physical expression of gender, bringing together some of the stellar artistic team behind his solo DESH: writer Karthika Naïr, visual artist Tim Yip, lighting designer Michael Hulls and dramaturg Ruth Little.