NILS VÖLKER

Two Hundred and Seventy
Through the combination of an everyday material with precise technology the mixed media installation fills the whole columned hall from the 19th century with its fluid movement and peculiar sound. Concavely arranged and floating above the spectators heads the form of the artwork seems to pass the skylight like the sun’s rays. Subdivided into nine columns, the nearly 70 square metres large piece of art follows a site-specific choreography determined by a program. Its moving surface is made from 270 white garbage bags, being inflated and deflated. In this way shapes and the boundaries of the installation itself start to dissolve. “Two Hundred and Seventy“ is the first installation with an undisguised view behind the scenes and onto the origin of the wavelike and organic movement: 1080 fans, lots of cables and 45 circuit boards

Zaha Hadid Architects

Beijing’s newest airport
The core of the modern architecture project, which is the place where the passengers move through, was inspired by traditional Chinese architecture designs

bill viola

比尔•维奥拉
빌 비올라
ביל ויולה
ビル·ヴィオラ
БИЛЛ ВИОЛА
martyrs (earth, air, fire, water)

“As the work opens, four individuals are shown in stasis, a pause from their suffering. Gradually there is movement in each scene as an element of nature begins to disturb their stillness. Flames rain down, winds begin to lash, water cascades, and earth flies up. As the elements rage, each martyr’s resolve remains unchanged. In their most violent assault, the elements represent the darkest hour of the martyr’s passage through death into the light.”

ron arad

رون اراد
阿拉德
רון ארד
ロン·アラッド
론 아라드
РОН АРАД
evocative proposal
For the canadian national holocaust monument competition, Ron Arad Studio teamed up with david adjaye associates to envision an evocative proposal commemorating the events, victims, and survivors of a grave moment in human history. Avoiding the use of direct symbols, the design places 23 sinuous and slender walls parallel to one another, creating a field of canyon-like passageways. Spaced 120 centimeters (47 in) apart, visitors are only able to pass through each crevice in single file. The partitions rise to a height of 14 meters (46 feet), drawing the eye upward toward the framed sky. This isolated journey is complemented by the shared experience of reflecting back on the monument’s significance.

Yihan LI

Since the emergence of time as a concept, the circle has been a graphic representation that registers and measures the passing of seconds, minutes, hours, and even decades. . . . The torus may be seen as a three-dimensional form utilized to represent time as it travels through a cyclic loop. The geometric shape of the torus speaks of duration, of looped time, and of transformations along and in time. In this project, Boolean operations between varying tori in multiple dimensions indicate the interaction between durations—possibly time in addition to time, or interactions diluted by time—that reveal a new architectural realm featuring free curves which direct visitors’ movements inside flowing spaces. People will lose the perception of direction or time and find themselves worshipping in open and serene volumes.

Kenny Wong

Squint
file festival
I was inspired by how the sunlight bounces around in our artificial forest.
“Squint” is a kinetic light installation consisting of 49 mirrors that reflect lights in a bright space. The mirrors track and reflect lights on audiences’ face with composed patterns of movements. It extends the generated perception by focusing on how lights pass across our visual senses physically, and combines with our perception of images through flickering. “Squint”, which extracts various daily experiences to an abstraction brings the audience to expand their interpretation of lights and perceived imagination into a non-linear experience.
“Squint” simulates light source and intentionally shines lights on audience’s faces. Bright light is projected in the gallery, a clean bright space.
Everyday people are dynamically moving around in the city. Sunlight reflects and flickers even when it is indirect and hidden behind the artifacts. While we are traveling, we are experiencing motion. We are also experiencing the shift of light intensity, visual patterns and textures. The varieties of light forms inspire the artist to explore the potential of light textures, select and sort out the combined complexity in urban space. The artist turns them into a minimal form of light experience, while maximizing its diversity of perception.

RANDOM INTERNATIONAL

随机国际
future self

‘future self’ is a study in human movement. the installation captures movement in light to create a three dimensional ‘living sculpture based on the composite gestures surrounding it, mirroring the actions of those who pass around it. entirely hand-made, 30,000 LED lights line the brass rods which are arranged to create a structure reminiscent of a rectangular prism, 3D cameras record people’s motions which are expressed through a ghostly, illuminated image, constantly changing.

STARGATE

Roland Emmerich
In 1994, Egyptologist and linguist Daniel Jackson, Ph.D., is invited by Catherine Langford to translate Egyptian hieroglyphs on cover stones, also known as casing stones, that her father had unearthed in Giza, Egypt, in 1928. Jackson is taken to a U.S. Air Force installation and told by its commander, Special Operations Colonel Jack O’Neil, that the project is classified information. Jackson determines that the hieroglyphs refer to a “stargate” which uses constellations as spatial coordinates. On this revelation, Jackson is shown that the base has this Stargate, also discovered by Langford’s father. They use Jackson’s coordinates to align the Stargate’s metal ring with markings along its outside, and once all seven are locked in, a wormhole opens, connecting the Stargate with a distant planet. Jackson joins O’Neil and his team, consisting of Reilly, Porro, Freeman, Brown, Ferretti, and Kawalsky, as they pass through the wormhole.
CINEMA

Cajsa von Zeipel

Blind Man’s Bluff
Swedish artist Cajsa Von Zeipel’s BDSM-ish eight-foot-high sculptures Passing Through Kicking Legs and Blind-Man’s Bluff are neutered of being overtly sexual by being cast in all white. The figures’ nearly emaciated bodies are heavily influenced by the artist engaging in forced starvation prior to starting this body of work. more

DILLER + SCOFIDIO

The Blur Building (an architecture of atmosphere)
The Blur Building is a media pavilion for Swiss EXPO 2002 at the base of Lake Neuchatel in Yverdon-les-Bains, Switzerland.From piles in the water, a tensegrity system of rectilinear struts and diagonal rods cantilevers out over the lake. Ramps and walkways weave through the tensegrity system, some of them providing a counterweight for the structure. The form is based on the work of Buckminster Fuller.The pavilion is made of filtered lake water shot as a fine mist through 13,000 fog nozzles creating an artificial cloud that measures 300 feet wide by 200 feet deep by 65 feet high. A built-in weather station controls fog output in response to shifting climatic conditions such as temperature, humidity, wind direction, and wind speed.The public can approach Blur via a ramped bridge. The 400 foot long ramp deposits visitors at the center of the fog mass onto a large open-air platform where movement is unregulated. Visual and acoustical references are erased along the journey toward the fog leaving only an optical “white-out” and the “white-noise” of pulsing water nozzles. Prior to entering the cloud, each visitor responds to a questionnaire/character profile and receives a “braincoat” (smart raincoat). The coat is used as protection from the wet environment and storage of the personality data for communication with the cloud’s computer network. Using tracking and location technologies, each visitor’s position can be identified and their character profiles compared to any other visitor.In the Glass Box, a space surrounded by glass on six sides, visitors experience a “sense of physical suspension only heightened by an occasional opening in the fog.” As visitors pass one another, their coats compare profiles and change color indicating the degree of attraction or repulsion, much like an involuntary blush – red for affinity, green for antipathy. The system allows interaction among 400 visitors at any time.Visitors can climb another level to the Angel Bar at the summit. The final ascent resembles the sensation of flight as one pierces through the cloud layer to the open sky. Here, visitors relax, take in the view, and choose from a large selection of commercial waters, municipal waters from world capitals, and glacial waters. At night, the fog will function as a dynamic and thick video screen.

STUDIO FUKSAS

Shenzhen Bao’an International Airport

The new terminal of Shenzhen Bao’an International Airport, the first airport by Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas, encompasses 63 contact gates, with a further 15 remote gates and significant retail space.
It increase the capacity of the airport by 58%, allowing the airport to handle up to 45 million passengers per year.The sculptural 500,000 sqm terminal evokes the image of a manta ray and features an internal and external double skin honeycomb motif that wraps the structure.1.5 km long, with roof spans of up to 80 m, honeycomb shaped metal and glass panels punctuate the façade of the terminal allowing natural light to filter through. Inside, the terminal is characterized by distinctive white conical supporting columns that rise to touch the roof at a cathedral-like scale.The focal point of the design is the concourse located at the intersection of the building.
Consisting of three levels – departure, arrivals and services – vertically connected to create full height voids and allowing natural light to filter from the highest level down to the lowest.

LEO VILLAREAL

레오 비야 레알
Лев Вильярреал
multiverse

Multiverse is one of Villareal’s largest and most complex light sculptures. It is experienced by visitors as they pass through the Concourse walkway between the East and West Buildings. The work features approximately 41,000 computer-programmed LED (light-emitting diode) nodes that run through existing channels along the 200-foot-long space. The programming both instructs the lights and allows for an element of chance, so that it is very unlikely that any pattern will repeat during a viewer’s experience.

ÉTIENNE-LOUIS BOULLÉE

Cénotaphe à Newton

Boullée promoted the idea of making architecture expressive of its purpose, a doctrine that his detractors termed architecture parlante (“talking architecture”), which was an essential element in Beaux-Arts architectural training in the later 19th century. His style was most notably exemplified in his proposal for a cenotaph (a funerary monument celebrating a figure interred elsewhere) for the English scientist Isaac Newton, who 50 years after his death became a symbol of Enlightenment ideas. The building itself was a 150 m (500 ft) tall sphere, taller than the Great Pyramids of Giza, encompassed by two large barriers circled by hundreds of cypress trees. The massive and spheric shape of the building was inspired by Boullée’s own study called “theory of bodies” where he claims that the most beautiful and perfect natural body is the sphere, which is the most prominent element of the Newton Memorial. Though the structure was never built, Boullée had many ink and wash drawings engraved and circulated widely in the professional circles in 1784. The small sarcophagus for Newton is placed at the lower pole of the sphere. The design of the memorial is intended to create the effect of day and night. The night effect occurs when the sarcophagus is illuminated by the sunlight coming through the holes in the vaulting, giving the illusion of stars in the night sky. The day effect is an armillary sphere hanging in the center that gives off a mysterious glow. Thus, the use of light in the building’s design causes the building’s interior to change its appearance.