Maurizio Bolognini

SMSMS-SMS Mediated Sublime

CIMs-Collective Intelligence Machines

“In 2000, I began to connect some of these computers to the mobile phone network (SMSMS-SMS Mediated Sublime, and CIMs-Collective Intelligence Machines). This enabled me to make interactive and multiple installations, connecting various locations.
In this case the flow of images was made visible by large-scale video-projections and the members of the audience were able to modify their characteristics in real time, by sending new inputs to the system from their own phones. This was done in a similar way to certain applications used in electronic democracy. What I had in mind was art which was generative, interactive and public.”

Maria Guta and Adrian Ganea

Cyberia

Performance & live computer generated simulation

A postmodern fairytale, Cyberia takes place somewhere in a cold distant East, stretching between and endless imaginary realm and a vast physical space. It is a westwards journey towards a promised future with no arrival and no return. There is no here or there, only a twilight zone between a departure point and a simulated destination. Between digital video projections and a physical setting, using the mechanics of a video-game engine with a motion capture suit, Cyberia is the simulation of an endless pre-climax state where a performer and a CG avatar dance as one to the rhythms of an imaginary West. In a world oversaturated by digital data –mysticism and paranormal are as popular as ever. Emerging technologies are increasingly incorporated in a form of postmodern spiritualism, as Arthur C. Clarke points out: “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

Tromarama

Madakaripura

Digital image projection, software, real-time internet-based data, and sound
Installation shot at St. Saviour Church, London
Tromarama is an art collective founded in 2006 by Febie Babyrose, Herbert Hans and Ruddy Hatumena. Engaging with the notion of hyperreality in the digital age, their projects explore the interrelationship between the virtual and the physical world. Their works often combine video, installations, computer programming and public participation depicting the influence of digital media on the society perception towards their surroundings. They live and work between Jakarta and Bandung.

JIACONG YAN

We only come out at night
FILE FESTIVAL 2007
We Only Come Out at Night is an urban graffiti project involving interactive public projections. A site is selected at dawn and a sticker is stuck or a stencil image is sprayed at the location. When the sun sets, jellies are projected over the heads of pedestrians on the street. As the pedestrian walks underneath the projection, the monsters grab the shadows of the people and eat them. The sticker is then removed and the project visits another place at dawn. A website is created to track the history of the monster appearance in order to promote and create a mythology. There are seven monsters in total, each monster’s design and behavior is unique. Gula, the monster that always eat, Avaritia, the monster that stuffs you into his pants, Invidia, the monster that takes your image and pretends to be you, and so on. Each monster is unique but always sad.

Bruce Nauman

Nature Morte
Nature Morte focuses on Nauman’s long relationship to his own studio, a variation on his four unique multi-projection videos, Mapping the Studio (2001). Three viewing stations, each consisting of an iPad linked to a wall-sized projection, provide an interactive exploration of the 3D studio space. Only now the artist is absent, and the participant becomes performer as he/she manipulates the large scale video projections on an iPad using touch control. The participant is free to navigate anywhere throughout the space, selecting broad vistas or individual objects. Using a hand-held 3D scanner, Nauman recorded hundreds of images that allow participants to select an object and locate close-up anything found there, and further reorient the image to see an object from above and below, and at times inside-out. The resulting mobility intensifies the experience of the viewer/performer. Presenting a static, but immersive re-creation of his studio space, Nauman’s pieces once again play at the tenuous lines between the body and space, perception and physical material.

Raven Kwok

Derivations
“A collaboration with Symmetry Labs at Gray Area Foundation for the Arts in San Francisco. Derivatives of multiple generative rules I designed in the past were adapted to an interactive LED floor. The video demo includes 6 visual sets and transitions in between. Set 01 is an adaption of 1DFBD, which was also used in a couple of projection mapping tests in 2014. Set 03 is derived from an untitled turbulence piece created in 2014 as well. Similar to Set 03, all agents in Set 04 are driven by 3D Perlin Noise flow field. However, instead of being an emitter spawning agents, each dot functions as an attractor intervening in the flow, same way as it did in 2BCD.”Raven Kwok

urbanscreen

320 degree licht

L’installation «320° Lumière» du groupe artistique URBANSCREEN, implanté à Brême, utilise comme point de départ la beauté et le caractère de cathédrale du Gazomètre pour créer un jeu fascinant de volumes et de lumière. Des motifs graphiques se développent et se transforment dans un rayon de 320 degrés sur la paroi intérieure du Gazomètre d’une hauteur de 100 mètres. Le spectateur assiste alors à une alternance entre un espace réel et un espace virtuel, le Gazomètre semble se dissoudre dans ses propres structures filigranes pour finalement retrouver continuellement sa forme distincte. «320 ° Lumière» est réalisée à partir d’une technologie de projection Epson. L’installation couvrant une surface de 20 000 mètres carré fait partie des projections intérieures les plus grandes et en terme de technique les plus complexes.

Daito Manabe

真鍋 大 度
Perfume

Perfume is Japan’s top techno-pop girl trio – Nocchi, Kashiyuka and Aa-Chan – whose music and synchronised dance sessions have won them a global online fan base. This year they have had their first sellout European tour. Their distinctive sound is the work of Japanese electronic music guru Yasatuka Nakata who has been their music producer since 2003. Their stunning performance at the Lions International Festival of Creativity at Cannes recently was the result of their collaboration with leading Japanese techno-artist Daito Manabe. Manabe is one of a new generation of programmers whose genre-crossing work has placed him at the cutting edge of techno-art-music-performance. His art embraces dynamic sensory programming, projection mapping and body capture; lasers, robots and sonar.

Hussein Chalayan

フセイン·チャラヤン
ЧАЛАЯН
후세인 샬 라얀
Intel connected accessories

Designer Hussein Chalayan partnered with Intel to bring wearable tech to his spring/summer 2017 fashion week show. Five models walked the runway alongside visual projections that showed their stress levels on the walls. All of it was made possible by vital information sent through the wearable tech they sported on the runway.

JENNY HOLZER

珍妮•霍尔泽
ג’ני הולצר
ジェニー·ホルツァー
제니 홀저
ДЖЕННИ ХОЛЬЦЕР
for saam

Jenny Holzer (b. 1950) is an internationally renowned artist best known for her pioneering work incorporating texts into light-based sculptures and projections. For SAAM (2007) is Holzer’s first cylindrical column of light and text created from white electronic LEDs (light emitting diodes). The piece, according to the artist, is “sensitive to the formal integrity of the museum and attuned to the experience of the collection and space.”

Jennifer Steinkamp

Jennifer Steinkamp uses computer animation to create video projections and immersive installations, dynamic works that explore the relationship between architectural space, motion, and perception. When projected, Steinkamp’s dimensionally modeled images create the illusion of receding space, generating a dialogue with the real space occupied by the viewer. Steinkamp’s imagery ranges from abstract undulating forms to subjects drawn from nature, such as the cascade of flowers in her 2008 series, “It’s a nice day for a white wedding.”

FIONA TAN

פיונה טאן
フィオナ·タン
Фиона Тан
فيونا تان
Rise and Fall
Fiona Tan explores storytelling, memory, and the part they play in the formation of identity throughout this exhibition of five video installations, various associated sketches and one single-channel video. Rise and Fall (2009), elongated projections onto two large, side-by-side screens, is a wordless meditation, set to music, of a woman no longer young but still conscious of her looks; she was clearly a beauty in her youth. As the video proceeds we gather that the young woman pictured on the second screen is the memory of her younger self. They often move through domestic activities (sleeping, bathing, dressing) in parallel; this is inter-cut with scenes of violently rushing water (shot at Niagra Falls, it turns out). It’s a hackneyed metaphor – the water’s endless surging as an image of time’s relentless uni-directionality – but in Tan’s hands that doesn’t seem to matter; she creates extraordinarily emotional work out of simple stories and well-worn themes.

Daniel Léveillé

Solitudes duo
Solitudes duo est la prolongation de Solitudes solo, sa plus récente création, couronnée par le Prix de la meilleure œuvre chorégraphique 2012-2013 par le Conseil des arts et des lettres au Québec. Mettant un terme à la nudité, Daniel Léveillé offrait alors à ses danseurs des solos épurés, débarrassés de toute projection affective, mais empreints d’une douceur inattendue. Cette nouvelle étape questionne la nature des relations encore possibles dans un monde où l’omniprésence de la technologie isole toujours davantage. Les couples de la pièce exposent dans toute leur complexité les états mouvants de l’amour et de la relation à l’autre.

JENNIFER STEINKAMP

Street Views

Jennifer Steinkamp uses computer animation to create video projections and immersive installations, dynamic works that explore the relationship between architectural space, motion, and perception. When projected, Steinkamp’s dimensionally modeled images create the illusion of receding space, generating a dialogue with the real space occupied by the viewer. Steinkamp’s imagery ranges from abstract undulating forms to subjects drawn from nature, such as the cascade of flowers in her 2008 series, “It’s a nice day for a white wedding.”

MARCIO AMBROSIO

Oups!
Oups!
FILE SAO PAULO 2007
Capturing and tracking camera, animated image integration and projection
Created in 2007. Oups! was born from the wish to mix new technologies and classic animation in a playful and artistic way. Each animated sequence has a script and the visitor interacts and transforms himself into an actor of this story.
When the visitor enters in a defined space, a camera records his image and projects it on a screen in front (like a mirror) in real size and time. The visitor sees himself integrated to an animation setting that follow his movements. He founds himself immersed in a creative universe of images and sounds. The animation sequences that feed this universe are stored in a video library, new animations may be added to enrich the project. Oups! universe is playful and naive, accessible to all publics and ages.
video
VIDEO 2

AZIZ + CUCHER

Synaptic Bliss
Begun in 2003, the series of works collectively known as “SYNAPTIC BLISS” explore ideas of a digital consciousness that allows for the simultaneous perception of multiple perspectives and scales, as well as the blurring of the distinctions between the body and its environment, the exterior and the interior, and the organic and the artificial. The works in this ongoing series include a variety of media, ranging from architectural installations, to video projections and environments, as well as digital prints and hand-woven rugs.