LEANDRO ERLICH

Леандро Эрлих
莱安德罗·埃利希
Dalston House
The Dalston House resembles a movie set, featuring the façade of a late nineteenth-century Victorian terraced house. A mirrored surface is positioned on the on the ground lying life size façade, in a 45-degree angle. Visitiors apppear to be hanging of the building or sitting on window sills, by sitting, standing or lying on the horizontal surface. The audience plays an important and active role in the installations for Erlich. By altering the viewer’s relationship with familiar spaces, he playfully disrupts our own notion of reality,through the mirrored projection of the image, creating new possibilities and situations.

 

Maurizio Bolognini

SMSMS-SMS Mediated Sublime

CIMs-Collective Intelligence Machines

“In 2000, I began to connect some of these computers to the mobile phone network (SMSMS-SMS Mediated Sublime, and CIMs-Collective Intelligence Machines). This enabled me to make interactive and multiple installations, connecting various locations.
In this case the flow of images was made visible by large-scale video-projections and the members of the audience were able to modify their characteristics in real time, by sending new inputs to the system from their own phones. This was done in a similar way to certain applications used in electronic democracy. What I had in mind was art which was generative, interactive and public.”

Nonotak

Versus
Elaborated by the French/Japanese duo Nonotak, ‘VERSUS’ is an immersive A/V experience that questions the relationship between 360° image and sound. The viewer finds himself submerged, at the centre of a perfectly geometric environment that constantly redefines space by breaking distances between projection, audience and screen. The work gives the illusion of a new type of architecture, a world created from distortions that shatter boundaries, and that brings the idea of infinity.

João Martinho Moura

WIDE/SIDE
WIDE/SIDE is an interactive installation in which shapes, images, and sounds are joined and interdependent. A visually engaging block, captivating in its monochromatic conception and minimalist lines, serves as a projection screen and teems with conglomerations of lines and shapes. As a result the installation is always changing and acquiring countless different forms.
The individual forms of the projections in reality are based on the surrounding environment, responding to the movements and gestures of the viewers. Visitors and passersby therefore themselves become part of the work and define its appearance.

Tromarama

Madakaripura

Digital image projection, software, real-time internet-based data, and sound
Installation shot at St. Saviour Church, London
Tromarama is an art collective founded in 2006 by Febie Babyrose, Herbert Hans and Ruddy Hatumena. Engaging with the notion of hyperreality in the digital age, their projects explore the interrelationship between the virtual and the physical world. Their works often combine video, installations, computer programming and public participation depicting the influence of digital media on the society perception towards their surroundings. They live and work between Jakarta and Bandung.

Moment Factory

Animistic Imagery
The exhibit introduces visitors to Duffy, the AI Artist, with an invitation to collaborate inside her Symbiotic Studio. This immersive space, made possible through projection mapping and interactive technology, invites guests to become the AI’s muse. As Duffy captures movements generated by visitors through real-time tracking, she draws links and connections, consulting a vast collection of colors and archetypal images of life on Earth. The result is an infinite series of surprising works of art—an artificial interpretation of humanity and the natural world.

Joanie Lemercier

Brume
Brume is a series of works and installations by Joanie Lemercier, using a custom made device made of atomized water. Joanie frees his work from the screen and usual physical devices. He is using space and immateriality as a canvas, creating a mid air floating projection feeling. Thanks to this volumetric tool, he is modifying our frontal relationship with screen and allowing new interaction between the viewer and the projected image. Joanie Lemercier is still exploring the possibilities of this new medium with a series of experiences and chapters, questioning our view of reality. In his work, Joanie is researching timeless subjects like light, matter, geometry. With Brume, he is also interested in the link between water and light.

JIACONG YAN

We only come out at night
FILE FESTIVAL 2007
We Only Come Out at Night is an urban graffiti project involving interactive public projections. A site is selected at dawn and a sticker is stuck or a stencil image is sprayed at the location. When the sun sets, jellies are projected over the heads of pedestrians on the street. As the pedestrian walks underneath the projection, the monsters grab the shadows of the people and eat them. The sticker is then removed and the project visits another place at dawn. A website is created to track the history of the monster appearance in order to promote and create a mythology. There are seven monsters in total, each monster’s design and behavior is unique. Gula, the monster that always eat, Avaritia, the monster that stuffs you into his pants, Invidia, the monster that takes your image and pretends to be you, and so on. Each monster is unique but always sad.

Bruce Nauman

Nature Morte
Nature Morte focuses on Nauman’s long relationship to his own studio, a variation on his four unique multi-projection videos, Mapping the Studio (2001). Three viewing stations, each consisting of an iPad linked to a wall-sized projection, provide an interactive exploration of the 3D studio space. Only now the artist is absent, and the participant becomes performer as he/she manipulates the large scale video projections on an iPad using touch control. The participant is free to navigate anywhere throughout the space, selecting broad vistas or individual objects. Using a hand-held 3D scanner, Nauman recorded hundreds of images that allow participants to select an object and locate close-up anything found there, and further reorient the image to see an object from above and below, and at times inside-out. The resulting mobility intensifies the experience of the viewer/performer. Presenting a static, but immersive re-creation of his studio space, Nauman’s pieces once again play at the tenuous lines between the body and space, perception and physical material.

Karen Lancel & Hermen Maat

Paranoid Panopticum

Entering The Paranoid Panopticum you will run across your own fixation on control. While you will be able to control the visual by mirror and video- projection, a shift in the perception of reality takes place. Controlling changes into fear of being controlled, maximizing control becomes its own threat. In the Paranoid Panopticum you are haunted by your own mirrored projections. You can play with your own projection in a paradox based on the myth of Echo, Narcissus and his mirrored image. At the moment where Narcissus commits suicide, the mirrored image of the visitor is ‘suicided’. At this point the story starts over again.

Anne-Sarah Le Meur & Jean-Jacques Birgé

Omni-Vermille
Omni-Vermille is based on computer-generated real-time 3D images. The programmed code allows light spots to oscillate against a dark background. The colors sometimes move dynamically, sometimes calmly across the projection surface; sometimes they evoke plasticity, sometimes depth. This continuous metamorphosis endows the contents of the images with a sensual, even lively quality. The metamorphosis designed by algorithms opens up a new time-based morphology of colors and forms for painting. The play of colors is accompanied by a stereophonic sound composition by Jean-Jacques Birgé (*1952, France). The sounds follow the shapes of the colors, only to stand out again the next moment: the combination of sound and image results entirely from the laws of random simultaneity.

Marc Lee

10.000 Moving Cities
Visitors can select any city or place, using a digital interface. About the chosen place, the Internet is searched in real time for latest text, image, video and sound informations. Four projectors and eight audio speakers project the results into the space. Visitors are able to walk through the model and experience the information in 3D. Attracted and inspired by images, sound, text and videos, visitors explore the places and perceive fragments of the immense amount of data. Additionally audio and visuals constantly change, they are never the same, always in movement as the place as itself. Just as all cities over the world are different, so different and alive appear the projections and sounds.

Diana Thater

Abyss of Light

Abyss of Light is divided into three screens and into three acts, the traditional structure of classic narrative film. In the first act, all the images synchronize to form a single panorama of Bryce Canyon in Utah. In the second, the screens break away from one another into three parallel sequences wherein each projection shows the same one hundred images at different speeds. In the third, all three images synchronize once again to form a single wrapping panorama of Death Valley, California. The work is an ode to the American western, one of my favorite film genres. Despite my admiration, however, my desire is not to imitate westerns. Instead, I set up an abstraction in opposition to the idea of narrative, something that can be seen in all of my work. In Abyss of Light, continuous disruptions of the American landscape document my refusal to see the land as backdrop for man’s heroic conquering of the wild; instead I see it as a foreground, a subject to be contemplated for itself and for which wildness is a state of grace.

JOSEF SVOBODA

جوزيف سفوبودا
ЙОЗЕФА СВОБОДЫ
la traviata de verdi (Scenografia)
La technologie et la scénographie
Svoboda utilise les techniques de pointe en éclairage, en projection d’image et en mécanique de scène (scène cinétique) afin de s’affranchir des contraintes du lieu théâtral. La scène est pour Svoboda un instrument et un espace magique, lieu d’action de forces dramatiques, réelles, et non pas un espace illusionniste. La scénographie est une des disciplines de l’art théâtral, une composante de la mise en scène et un élément essentiel de la représentation. Elle doit donc d’être dynamique et se transformer dans le temps pour épouser l’action dramatique. La scénographie a un langage propre en tant que discipline à part entière. Svoboda apporte une contribution importante à ce langage par son travail sur la lumière et l’espace.
Lumière, matière et espace
Svoboda dit percevoir la lumière physiquement, et non pas simplement visuellement ; il trouve en elle l’inspiration pour son travail. Tout en reconnaissant son statut ” immatériel “, il la considère comme l’élément fondamental de la scénographie et la traite comme un matériau. D’abord formé en menuiserie, Svoboda affectionne particulièrement les matières brutes, notamment le bois. L’architecture représente pour lui, et ce dès son jeune âge, la somme des connaissances humaines. Formé en architecture d’intérieur, il s’intéresse à l’organisation de l’espace, à la rencontre scénique de l’architecture et du décor. Il privilégie les formes simples : la sphère, le cube et l’escalier. Svoboda croit que ” la mise en scène à l’italienne, bien qu’elle ne corresponde plus aux exigences des méthodes scénographiques actuelles, reste toujours la meilleure “.

ERNESTO KLAR

Эрнесто Клар
Convergenze parallele

Convergenze parallele is an audiovisual installation in which airborne dust particles passing through a beam of light are tracked, visualized, and sonified in realtime by a custom software system. The installation reacts to air movements in the exhibition space, allowing the viewer to see and hear the amplified movement of dust particles. “Convergenze parallele” explores the poetic potential of revealing and transforming the imperceptible. The custom software uses a video camera to capture the activity of dust articles passing through the beam of light. It then analyzes the video signal to track the location of individual dust particles, and reveals each particle’s trajectory in the image-processed projection. The physical particles draw traces of their otherwise invisible motion on the digital screen. At random intervals, the software artificially saturates the system by briefly activating the fan-a cloud of dust fills the beam of light and creates dense and stunning patterns of particle trajectories and sound.

File Festival

Marnix de Nijs

Accelerator

Marnix de Nijs’ installation examines the precarious balance of machine, image and body in time and the effects that accelerated forces of gravity have on today’s urban citizenry. Participants sit in a racing car seat attached to a motorized revolving arm and focus on a video projection which is simultaneously circulating with them.

Jennifer Steinkamp

Jennifer Steinkamp uses computer animation to create video projections and immersive installations, dynamic works that explore the relationship between architectural space, motion, and perception. When projected, Steinkamp’s dimensionally modeled images create the illusion of receding space, generating a dialogue with the real space occupied by the viewer. Steinkamp’s imagery ranges from abstract undulating forms to subjects drawn from nature, such as the cascade of flowers in her 2008 series, “It’s a nice day for a white wedding.”

FIONA TAN

פיונה טאן
フィオナ·タン
Фиона Тан
فيونا تان
Rise and Fall
Fiona Tan explores storytelling, memory, and the part they play in the formation of identity throughout this exhibition of five video installations, various associated sketches and one single-channel video. Rise and Fall (2009), elongated projections onto two large, side-by-side screens, is a wordless meditation, set to music, of a woman no longer young but still conscious of her looks; she was clearly a beauty in her youth. As the video proceeds we gather that the young woman pictured on the second screen is the memory of her younger self. They often move through domestic activities (sleeping, bathing, dressing) in parallel; this is inter-cut with scenes of violently rushing water (shot at Niagra Falls, it turns out). It’s a hackneyed metaphor – the water’s endless surging as an image of time’s relentless uni-directionality – but in Tan’s hands that doesn’t seem to matter; she creates extraordinarily emotional work out of simple stories and well-worn themes.

PAUL CHAN

1st light

Paul Chan’s work summons the darkness that envelops us despite the greedy illumination of our cities. Evoking our world on the verge of disintegration, it celebrates the light that emerges in too much light.
The fight is no longer the fight between day and night that inaugurates Murnau’s Faust, but that between the light of the spirit and the light of things. In this shadow theater, under the auspices of a telegraph pole shaped like the Golgotha ​​cross, we witness the rise of the objects of our consumerist societies.
Phones, I-Pods, scooters, whole trains rise to the sky, saved, as the shadows of men fall, hurled to the abyss, like the suicide bodies of “September 11” victims falling from burning towers.
The image, gradually modified along the continuum of projection, carries with it the prophecies of the Apocalypse rehashed by American fundamentalist movements, and the obvious disgrace of a society that celebrates its materialist cult.

Steven Holl Architects

Ecology and Planning Museums

Entering on the ground level to the ecology museum reveals a projection next to the restaurant and retail areas. an elevator takes guests to the top level where their descent through the three ecologies – earth to cosmos, earth to man, earth to earth – begins, connected through a series of ramps.
the earth to earth exhibit on the bottom floor features a plane that turns clockwise, moving slowly down towards the ocean ecology space appropriately situated under the reflecting pond of the exterior plaza. the earth to earth section contains four outdoor green terraces as temporary exhibit spaces that change with the seasons.The shared public square also marks the entrance to the planning museum where visitors are greeted by a large model of the eco-city and another temporary display area. a multimedia system makes the next sequence of program, the theory and practice zones, come to life with dynamic informative videos, images, and sounds, all located on the second level. mechanical escalators transport guests to the third floor where one-way display is turned into an interactive relationship with the viewer. this is accompanied by a 3D cinema and a restaurant with views out towards the sea. on the top storey one can find the green architecture, landscape and water resources exhibits as well as access to the vegetative roof-scape offering offering unmatched views.

ELIZABETH MCALPINE

’98m

Le travail d’Elizabeth McAlpine est souvent lié à la question du temps et à l’expérience du regard. Dans « The Height of the Campanile », l’artiste a calculé la durée de son film en fonction de la hauteur de son sujet, le Campanile, de sorte qu’au final la longueur de la pellicule soit équivalente à celle de la tour. De même, le temps nécessaire pour visionner le film et le rythme du travelling effectué par la caméra correspondent. Ainsi, tandis que nombre des oeuvres de McAlpine sont basées sur le montage, la répétition et la fragmentation, « 98m » se présente comme un simple plan-séquence.
L’image, au grain apparent, est projetée au mur à la taille d’une carte postale, pendant que le film forme une boucle au sein d’une structure en verre pensée par l’artiste. La taille de la projection rappelle que Venise est devenue une destination touristique incontournable. L’utilisation du Super 8 est une évocation de la pratique amateur – précédant l’invention de la vidéo, du touriste fixant le souvenir de ses vacances pour le projeter une fois rentré à la maison. Si ce support procure à l’oeuvre un caractère daté, la boucle continue et hypnotique formée par la pellicule suggère au contraire une certaine intemporalité, semblable à celle que peut ressentir le touriste qui découvre San Marco.

Terike Haapoja

entropy

“Entropy” installation is a thermo cam image of a horse’s body cooling down after its death. The corpse’s hottest areas are indicated with red colour and the coldest areas with blue and black. Visual evidence of life’s presence slowly vanishes as heat flees from the horse’s body. The original documentation, lasting for several hours, is edited down to a half an hour. Presented as a life-size projection.
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Tobias Putrih

Re-projection: Hoosac

Influenced by the utopian projects — and notable failures — of innovative artists and designers such as Buckminster Fuller, Frederick Kiesler, and Charles Eames, Tobias Putrih likens his works to experiments, or design prototypes. His use of cheap materials, including egg crates, cardboard, and plywood signify both a sense of potential and impending collapse. Many of the artist’s works reference the architecture and spectacle of the cinema: a space suspended between fantasy and reality, image and environment. With Re-projection: Hoosac Putrih distills the cinema to its most basic element: fishing line stretched across the gallery mimics the conical trajectory of a beam of light. A spotlight hits the strands of monofilament which in turn become a screen, reflecting an image in illuminated dots. Inspired by the Hoosac Tunnel just east of North Adams — a storied, engineering marvel that draws ghost-hunters to the area — Putrih’s tunnel is, likewise, both real and a representation, an optical trick that invites both wonder and investigation.

Camille Henrot

Endangered Species
Best-known for her videos and animated films combining drawn art, music and occasionally scratched or reworked cinematic images, Camille Henrot’s work blurs the traditionally hierarchical categories of art history. Her recent work, adapted into the diverse media of sculpture, drawing, photography and, as always, film, considers the fascination with the “other” and “elsewhere” in terms of both geography and sexuality. This fascination is reflected in popular modern myths that have inspired her, such as King Kong and Frankenstein. The artist’s impure, hybrid objects cast doubt upon the linear and partitioned transcription of Western history and highlight its borrowings and grey areas. In the series of sculptures Endangered Species, for example, the artist has created objects inspired by African art by using pieces from car engines; placed on tall pedestals, these slender silhouettes with zoomorphic allure make reference to the migration of symbols and forms as well as to the economic circulation of objects. This survival of the past, full of misunderstandings, shifts and projections (as shown in the slideshow Egyptomania, the film Cynopolis, drawings of the Sphinx, and even in the photographs of prehistoric flints) troubles cultural codes and conventions. In this way, Camille Henrot’s work questions mental resistances and the past’s resonance, whether it be drawn from myth or from reality.

JENNIFER STEINKAMP

Street Views

Jennifer Steinkamp uses computer animation to create video projections and immersive installations, dynamic works that explore the relationship between architectural space, motion, and perception. When projected, Steinkamp’s dimensionally modeled images create the illusion of receding space, generating a dialogue with the real space occupied by the viewer. Steinkamp’s imagery ranges from abstract undulating forms to subjects drawn from nature, such as the cascade of flowers in her 2008 series, “It’s a nice day for a white wedding.”

MARCIO AMBROSIO

Oups!
Oups!
FILE SAO PAULO 2007
Capturing and tracking camera, animated image integration and projection
Created in 2007. Oups! was born from the wish to mix new technologies and classic animation in a playful and artistic way. Each animated sequence has a script and the visitor interacts and transforms himself into an actor of this story.
When the visitor enters in a defined space, a camera records his image and projects it on a screen in front (like a mirror) in real size and time. The visitor sees himself integrated to an animation setting that follow his movements. He founds himself immersed in a creative universe of images and sounds. The animation sequences that feed this universe are stored in a video library, new animations may be added to enrich the project. Oups! universe is playful and naive, accessible to all publics and ages.
video
VIDEO 2

EDUARD HAIMAN AND VADIM SMAKHTIN

Struct- Generative Realtime Audio-Visual Environment
The target of “Struct” was to create installation which could make immersive environment inside the space of public event dedicated to the opening of the office of an architectural company UNK Projects. It was planned to make this installation fully autonomic during the several hours as well as there was an idea to hold the public interested and immersed into the space of environment during the all period of time.

The main conception of the installation is to create the second alternative scale inside the internal space of the office. It was realized screen projection for this with the size of 18×4 meters and taken almost whole the length of the interior. The Animated surface was projected as the extension of the super-graphic situated on the facade of office`s building. The external graphic was created by Vladimir Garanin. The first one layer is the super-graphic onto the facade and another one layer is the real-time generative graphic inside the interior. The visual image and algorithmic sound of the whole structure are connected each other and are forming the whole organism.