Tatiana Plakhova

Antrum
The installation looks like a grotto of the membrane, the surface of which is inhabited by strange creatures. It’s complex structure causes association with living creatures, space objects and architectural constructions. In this frontier word pure mathematical abstractions are mixed with natural shapes, resulting in formation of new entities. Viewers can push the membrane and try to contact with them.

Ouchhh

H OM E OMOR PH ISM

Dome A/V Performance

A homeomorphism, also called a continuous transformation, is an equivalence relation and
one-to-one correspondence between points in two geometric figures or topological spaces
that is continuous in both directions.Many forms observed in nature can be related to geometry. In accordance with classical geometry,the shapes that found in nature are consisting of lines and planes, circles and spheres,
triangles and cones. These shapes actually are a powerful abstraction of reality, so we need primitive objects to give a form and understand the complex structure that exists in nature.

 

David Rabinowitch

“6 Sided Plane in 5 Masses and 3 Scales with 2 Free Regions
The drawings also clarify the schema underlying the locations of the bored holes in the sculptures. Situated along lines linking vertices at the perimeter of the forms, they recall constellation maps or, as with 8 Sided Plane in 7 Masses and 2 Scales with Free Region (1975/2018), the plans of Romanesque cathedrals. Here, again, the relationship is inverted. The black shapes representing the solid stone columns in the plans echo the shafts of air bored through the steel. The term “Romanesque” appears frequently in Rabinowitch’s titles. Though absent here, the conglomeration of shapes visible in Romanesque church plans, like those of Cluny in France, bear an affinity with the additive sensibility evident in Rabinowitch’s structures. Donald Kuspit has focused attention on the artist’s interest in Northwest Coast traditions, especially the totem pole. Like the totem pole, Rabinowitch’s works manifest a “disrupted continuum,” a whole built out of distinct parts. For me, the presence of the drawings in this exhibition subtly undermined that assertion. The lines along which the bored holes are situated form a network that passes over all (or at least most) of the components in each work, in effect linking them. Though no longer visible in the steel versions, the connective links act as a reminder of this second related principle of organization. Some may see it as a complication, a discrepancy, or be disappointed by the realization, but I think it helps demystify these “new” early sculptures. At the same time, the proximity of the studies by no means diminished the deep-rooted and intriguing complexity of Rabinowitch’s sculptural work.”John Gayer

ANDY LOMAS

Morphogenetic Creations
Created by a mathematician, digital artist and Emmy award winning supervisor of computer generated effects – Andy Lomas, Morphogenetic Creations is a collection of works that explore the nature of complex forms that can be produced by digital simulation of growth systems. These pieces start with a simple initial form which is incrementally developed over time by adding iterative layers of complexity to the structure.The aim is to create structures emergently: exploring generic similarities between many different forms in nature rather than recreating any particular organism. In the process he is exploring universal archetypal forms that can come from growth processes rather than top-down externally engineered design.Programmed using C++ with CUDA, the series use a system of growth by deposition: small particles of matter are repeatedly deposited onto a growing structure to build incrementally over time. Rules are used to determine how new particles are created, and how they move before being deposited. Small changes to these rules can have dramatic effects on the final structure, in effect changing the environment in which the form is grown. To create these works, Andy uses the GPU as a compute device rather than as a display device. All the data is held in memory on the GPU and various kernel functions are called to do things like apply forces to the cells, make cells split, and to render the cells using ray-tracing. The simulations and rendering for each of the different animated structures within this piece take about 12 hours to run, Andy explains. By the end of the simulations there are over 50,000,000 cells in each structure.The Cellular Forms use a more biological model, representing a simplified system of cellular growth. Structures are created out of interconnected cells, with rules for the forces between cells, as well as rules for how cells accumulate internal nutrients. When the nutrient level in a cell exceeds a given threshold the cell splits into two, with both the parent and daughter cells reconnecting to their immediate neighbours. Many different complex organic structures are seen to arise from subtle variations on these rules, creating forms with strong reminiscences of plants, corals, internal organs and micro-organisms.

Gwyllim Jahn & Cameron Newnham +Soomeen Hahm Design +Igor Pantic

Steampunk Pavilion
Steampunk is a pavilion constructed from steam-bent hardwood, designed by Gwyllim Jahn, Cameron Newnham (Fologram), Soomeen Hahm Design and Igor Pantic for the 5th edition of Tallinn Architecture Biennale.
“Steampunk explores a path to rethink applications and traditions of craft in pursuit of their evolution.” Soomeen Hahm Design
“The structure challenges the idea of the primitive hut –showing how, by using algorithmic logic, simple raw materials can be turned into a highly complex and inhabitable structure”.Gilles Retsin

Robert Henke

Destructive observation field
The installation behaves like a living organism, it creates expanding and contracting forms that have a semi-organic appearance. During the course of the exhibition the deformations of the plate add up resulting in a more and more complex surface structure. The visible shapes will get more detailed and fragmented. The density of the stored information on the black plate increases. The characteristic visual appearance of the installation is the result of interference patterns, waves amplifying and canceling each other out in space, leaving complex traces of light and darkness.

REVITAL COHEN & TUUR VAN BALEN

The Immortal
A number of life-support machines are connected to each other, circulating liquids and air in attempt to mimic a biological structure.
The Immortal investigates human dependence on electronics, the desire to make machines replicate organisms and our perception of anatomy as reflected by biomedical engineering.
A web of tubes and electric cords are interwoven in closed circuits through a Heart-Lung Machine, Dialysis Machine, an Infant Incubator, a Mechanical Ventilator and an Intraoperative Cell Salvage Machine. The organ replacement machines operate in orchestrated loops, keeping each other alive through circulation of electrical impulses, oxygen and artificial blood.
Salted water acts as blood replacement: throughout the artificial circulatory system minerals are added and filtered out again, the blood gets oxygenated via contact with the oxygen cycle, and an ECG device monitors the system’s heartbeat. As the fluid pumps around the room in a meditative pulse, the sound of mechanical breath and slow humming of motors resonates in the body through a comforting yet disquieting soundscape.Life support machines are extraordinary devices; computers designed to activate our bodies when anatomy fails, hidden away in hospital wards. Although they are designed as the ultimate utilitarian appliances, they are extremely meaningful and carry a complex social, cultural and ethical subtext. While life prolonging technologies are invented as emergency measures to combat or delay death, my interest lies in considering these devices as a human enhancement strategy.This work is a continuation of my investigation of the patient as a cyborg, questioning the relationship between medicine and techno- fantasies about mechanical bodies, hyper abilities and posthumanism.

Mathias Gartner & Vera Tolazzi

THE TRANSPARENCY OF RANDOMNESS
“The Transparency of Randomness” gives insight into the world of randomness. In this interactive installation, visitors can directly experience the significance of the complex interplay of randomness and stochastics in current mathematical and physical research. 27 transparent boxes, floating in space, continuously generate random numbers by using the well-known medium of the dice.The process of random number generation is influenced by the complexity of nature and its structures, using a variety of natural materials. The ensemble of all generated random numbers forms the basis of a real-time calculation and comprehensibly demonstrates the impressive role in scientific research.

NED KAHN

Нед Кан
Tornado
A 10-foot tall vortex is formed by air blowers and an ultrasonic fog machine inside a sculpture installed in the atrium adjacent to the Winter Garden. The vortex continually changed shape in response to the surrounding air currents.These fluctuations gave the vortex an erratic and life-like appearance. Viewers were encouraged to alter the shape of the vortex with their hands. The calm, central core of the vortex is clearly evident.
Kahn’s interactive scientific projects leave little doubt about his command of meteorological processes. Through his immense technical ability, he demonstrates the versatility of turbulent systems, such as the vortices of wind and water. He employs diverse mechanical, pneumatic and electrical technologies to design, build and refine his installations. This is how he constructs dazzlingly complex but comprehensible images of nature that respond to viewers, conform to architectural structures, and reveal environmental conditions.

Haru Ji and Graham Wakefield

Infranet
Infranet is a generative artwork realized through a population of artificial lifeforms with evolutionary neural networks, thriving upon open geospatial data of the infrastructure of the city as their sustenance and canvas. Born curious, these agents form spatial networks through which associations spread in complex contagions. In this city as organism, the data grounds an unbounded, decentralized, open-ended, and unsupervised system. Non-human beings flourish in this environment by learning, discovering, communicating, self-governing, and evolving. The invitation is to witness, through immersive visualization and sonficiation of this complex adaptive system, how a new morphologic landscape emerges as a possible but speculative city.

RYOICHI KUROKAWA

黒川良一
rheo
This world-renowned Japanese artist’s impressive audiovisual compositions bring visual and sonic material together using a completely revolutionary perspective. His language, a new international benchmark in the world of digital art, field recordings and computer-generated structures coexist in harmony, and open the gateway to an imaginary world where complexity and simplicity alternate and combine in a strange symbiosis.

TIM HAWKINSON

蒂姆·霍金森
ティム·ホーキンソン
تيم هاوكينسون
Möbius Ship

The ambitious and imaginative structure of Hawkinson’s sculpture offers an uncanny visual metaphor for Melville’s epic tale, which is often considered the ultimate American novel. Möbius Ship also humorously refers to the mathematical concept of the Möbius Strip. Named after a nineteenth-century astronomer and mathematician, the Möbius Strip is a surface that has only one side, and exists as a continuous curve. Its simple yet complex spatial configuration presents a visual puzzle that parallels Hawkinson’s transformation of the mundane materials into something unexpected.

Maxim Zhestkov

Elements
Elements is an experimental art film by Maxim Zhestkov about nature, physics, art and love. More than 2 billion elements / particles governed by tensions and forces of nature were used to tell stories and show emotions through the motion of collective behavior.
The film is a trial to explore the idea that everything around us and inside us is made from simple elements / blocks which can be arranged in complex relationships and become compound structures. We could project this idea into emotions, behaviours, thought processes, relationships, life, planets and the universe.

urbanscreen

320 degree licht

L’installation «320° Lumière» du groupe artistique URBANSCREEN, implanté à Brême, utilise comme point de départ la beauté et le caractère de cathédrale du Gazomètre pour créer un jeu fascinant de volumes et de lumière. Des motifs graphiques se développent et se transforment dans un rayon de 320 degrés sur la paroi intérieure du Gazomètre d’une hauteur de 100 mètres. Le spectateur assiste alors à une alternance entre un espace réel et un espace virtuel, le Gazomètre semble se dissoudre dans ses propres structures filigranes pour finalement retrouver continuellement sa forme distincte. «320 ° Lumière» est réalisée à partir d’une technologie de projection Epson. L’installation couvrant une surface de 20 000 mètres carré fait partie des projections intérieures les plus grandes et en terme de technique les plus complexes.

Troika

AVA

Ava’ is Troika’s first sculptural manifestation of their exploration of algorithms. ‘Ava’ is the physical result of emergence and self organisation brought about by ‘growing’ a sculpture through the use of a computer algorithm that imitates the emergence of life by which complexity arises from the simplest of things. As such the sculpture probes at the nature of becoming, existence and our strive to understand and replicate the complexities of life.In a landscape where our personal data is a raw material, and where we, humans, have become subordinate spectators of algorithms and a computerised infrastructure, we ask the question how much or little are we capable of influencing our surrounding reality, how much is predetermined, how much is down to chance.

THEODORE SPYROPOULOS

BEHAVIOURAL COMPLEXITY

Design Research Laboratory (AADRL) and the experimental design studio Minimaforms examining a behavior-based agenda that engages experimental forms of material and social interaction. Cybernetic and systemic thinking through seminal forms of prototyping and experimentation will situate the work through continued experiments that have manifested since the early 1950s as maverick machines, architectures and computational practices exploring the generative potential of self-regulating phenomena as proto-architectural environments. Through explicit models of interactions, observable patterns and proto-animalistic agency; the research will discuss the capacity of these systems to evolve, adapt and self-structure through computation.

WORAPONG MANUPIPATPONG

SPACE INBETWEEN
The series of spatial structures are a combination and overlapping of basic architectural-elements (roof, floor, wall, window, and ladder) and furniture feature (platform with different level for seating, laying, leaning). The shape and form represent contemporary architecture with simplicity of form but complex spaces. These structures can be seen as a transition between inside and outside. It provides variety of posture and different level with intimate space.

Karina Smigla-Bobinski

Ada
File Festival
Similar to Tinguely’s “Méta-Matics”, “ADA” is an artwork with a soul. It acts itself. At Tinguely’s it is sufficient to be an unawarely struggling mechanical being. He took it wryly: the machine produces nothing but its industrial self-destruction. Whereas “ADA”, by Karina Smigla-Bobinski, is a post-industrial “creature“, visitor-animated, creatively acting artist-sculpture, self-forming artwork, resembling a molecular hybrid, such as a one from nanobiotechnology. It develops the same rotating silicon-carbon-hybrids, midget tools, miniature machines able to generate simple structures. “ADA” is much larger, esthetically much more complex, an interactive art-making machine.

Morphosis Architects

مورفوسيس المعماريين
モーフォシス建築家
모포 건축가
形态结构建筑师
Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics

The Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics at Caltech brings together a dozen different scientific groups into one structure. The Cahill Center designed by Morphosis Architects, Inc. conceptually acts as an astronomical instrument. A vertical volume pierces the building, tilting it open to the skies and resulting in an occupiable telescope. The Center also physically and symbolically connects Caltech’s South Campus with the the original complex of Spanish and Mediterranean buildings that comprise the historic North Campus. A series of interior corridors that run north to south serve as stitches, reinforcing the connection and serving to direct circulation.

PETER KOGLER

彼得·科格勒
Liquid
Peter Kogler`s works belong to the developing “post medial paintings” (Peter Weibl) in the 80`s. Moulded by the new media, these took on the complex form of installations. One of the main questions was the mental relationship between virtual and real space, as well as the perceptive possibilities of connection. The work, which reminds you of chaotic structures and Baroque dimensions, is based on the circularly moment of repetition, that consciously corresponds to the position of kunst Meran (pedestrian zone).

Daniel Buren

Pile Up-High relief n° B5
“PILE UP: Hauts reliefs. Situé Works” crée une série de structures basées sur des murs, tous mettant en évidence le processus complexe derrière la pratique de l’artiste.

BIAD-UFO

Phoenix International Media Center
According to Architect Shao Weiping, the design of the building resembles DNA-like double helix that has been wrapped into a loop.[4] He adds that the circular contours of the Phoenix complex echo the yin-yang symbol of ancient Chinese philosophy. The Phoenix Centre is notable for being an experimental building designed by a domestic firm.[5] Within the doughnut-shaped exterior “shell” are two conventially-structured interior towers.

ARCHITECTENBUREAU MARLIES ROHMER

The building of student dwellings in the complex of buildings belonging to Utrecht University has transformed the Uithof site into a full-fledged campus. It will also help relieve the chronic housing shortage for young people in the city of Utrecht. Within the line of freestanding buildings (‘Objectenstrook’) the master plan designed by OMA, our block of 380 independent and clustered rooms presents itself as a solitary mass with a 20 metre cantilever. The spectacular main concrete supporting structure consists of four slabs that together form a theatrical single table leg. The ‘leg’ and its rocking bench dramatize the main entrance and create an urban rendezvous which distills the encounters and the to-and- from of all those students.

RAF SIMONS AND PETER JELLITSCH

Peter Jellitsch (born 1982) operates at the intersection of science and art. His research-based practice develops in a complex process, in virtual and analogue worlds. His main concern is the visualisation of what is in fact invisible, of virtual phenomena and structures existing in everyday life yet imperceptible to the human eye. Peter Jellitsch is an exponent of a young generation whose perception of reality has undergone a radical change, due to new technology, and who quite naturally spread out their fields of work and ideas in new dimensions.

FREDERIK HEYMAN

فريدريك هيمان
弗雷德里克·海曼
פרדריק היימן
フレデリックヘイマン
ФРЕДЕРИК ХЕЙМАН

His work, humorous and surreal, helps to erase boundaries between photography, graphic design and space shaping. With many distortions (real or digital), not to mention strange and imposing installations, Heyman creates a world both unstructured and fascinating. Part of a new generation of photographers, his aim seems to give birth to a new kind of collaboration between all the arts, definitely modern and complex.

RACHAEL CHAMPION

Forced Landscape
Rachael Champion’s site-specific sculptures and installations are engaged in a discourse surrounding the dependant yet unclear relationship between industry, technology and nature. Her works consist of large scale constructions and dramatic architectural interventions that question the shifting interactions humanity has with the natural world and considers their boundaries, separations and progressive implications. Through manipulating information from diverse influences that include brutalist architecture, agriculture, raw materials, municipal infrastructure, public space and ecology, Champion questions the layered and dynamic complexities of our shifting physical environment.

Joe Diebes

Oyster
oyster is a new opera (in progress) about a surprising precursor to last.fm and Pandora. In the 1960’s, renowned American folklorist Alan Lomax developed a wildly ambitious system called cantometrics for coding and analyzing folk songs from every corner of the world. The opera is structured as a public lecture of Alan Lomax’s folk song analysis as demonstrated by four singers, who embody the IBM360 mainframe computer used to correlate his vast amounts of data. Working with the BOTCH vocal ensemble, I am reconstructing the folksong styles from regions as disparate as Bali, West Africa, and Central America using only the data from Lomax’s study. Things like melodic complexity, vocal blend, and nasality, are adjusted by the singers as they circumnavigate the globe. This data vocalization is further mediated by the ensemble’s distinctive extended vocal techniques, and is accompanied by a film narrative that unravels connections between cybernetics, surrealism and ethnography. The film also features a wide range of material drawn from the Alan Lomax archive at The Library of Congress.
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oyster will be performed by BOTCH ensemble: Christina Campanella, Michael Chinworth, John Rose, and Saori Tsukada

WORAPONG MANUPIPATPONG

Space Inbetween
“The series of spatial structures are combination and overlapping of basic architectural-elements (roof, floor, wall, window, and ladder) and furniture feature (platform with different level for seating, laying, leaning). The shape and form represent contemporary architecture with simplicity of form but complex spaces. These structures can be seen as a transition between inside and outside. It provides variety of posture and different level with intimate space.”

FREDERIK HEYMAN

فريدريك هيمان
弗雷德里克·海曼
פרדריק היימן
フレデリックヘイマン
ФРЕДЕРИК ХЕЙМАН

His work, humorous and surreal, helps to erase boundaries between photography, graphic design and space shaping. With many distortions (real or digital), not to mention strange and imposing installations, Heyman creates a world both unstructured and fascinating. Part of a new generation of photographers, his aim seems to give birth to a new kind of collaboration between all the arts, definitely modern and complex.

bongsu park

core
dancer – Yoomi Ahn
soundscape – Raymond Delepierre

Park’s most recent works are both a continuation and a development of her earlier videos. There is an added complexity to the structure of her material as well as a larger scope to her narrative.more

JON MCCORMACK

flicker

Flicker is an immersive electronic environment of generative image and sound. A collaborative work with Oliver Bown. Based on biological models of firefly behaviour, Flicker generates an ever shifting rhythmic, meditative environment to the viewer. Flicker uses 4 channels of synchronised high definition video and 8 channels of sound to immerse the viewer in a phenomenologically rich environment of artificial life. The work is a large-scale agent-based simulation, with each agent providing a rhythmic pulse at regular intervals. Agents try to synchronise their pulse with other agents in their immediate neighbourhood. The collective pulsations of groups of local agents are spatially sonified with int exhibition space. Over time, large groups synchronise at different rates, leading to complex visual and aural structures, syncopating and constant shifting in to a long term complexity.

MARTIN KALTENBRUNNER

reactable
file festival

The ReacTable is a collaborative electronic music instrument with a tabletop tangible multi-touch interface. Several simultaneous performers share complete control over the instrument by moving and rotating physical objects on a luminous round table surface. By moving and relating these objects, representing components of a classic modular synthesizer, users can create complex and dynamic sonic topologies, with generators, fi lters and modulators, in a kind of tangible modular synthesizer or graspable fl ow-controlled programming language. The instrument was developed by a team of digital luthiers under the direction of Dr. Sergi Jordà. The “Interactive Sonic Systems” team works in the Music Technology Group within the Audiovisual Institute at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona, Spain. Its main activities concentrate on the design of new musical interfaces, such as tangible musical instruments and musical applications for mobile devices. The reactable intends to be: collaborative: several performers (locally or remotely), intuitive: zero manual, zero instructions, sonically challenging and interesting, earnable and masterable (even for children), suitable for novices (installations) and advanced electronic musicians (concerts). The reactable hardware is based on a translucent, round multi-touch surface. A camera situated beneath the table continuously analyzes the surface, tracking the player’s fi ngertips and the nature, position and orientation of physical objects that are distributed on its surface. These objects represent the components of a classic modular synthesizer. The players interact by moving these objects, changing their distance, orientation and the relation to each other. These actions directly control the topological structure and parameters of the sound synthesizer. A projector, also from underneath the table, draws dynamic animations on its surface, providing a visual feedback of the state, the activity and the main characteristics of the sounds produced by the audio synthesizer.

Robert Henke

lumiére
a complete new version, the result of performing Lumière for more than one year, condensed into a more sophisticated, more complex, more fragile, more massive synaesthetic experience! photos and more info online in early February.Based on self written software, this work on the edge of concert and site specific installation finds previously unseen beauty and minimalistic elegance in a commonly underrated medium. High power lasers draw complex morphing shapes and connect points in space. Lumière combines precise geometric figures with floating organic structures, presenting the archaic sign language of an alien culture communicating via emerging and disappearing traces of extremely bright light.Percussive and textural sonic events provide a counterpoint to the visual rhythm, resulting in a multi sensorial experience which at times is fragile and quiet, at others massive and overwhelming. Each Lumière performance is a unique and site specific real time exploration of synchronicity and divergence, of light and darkness at the limits of perception.

1024 architecture

VORTEX

Architectural fragment made from scaffolding, VORTEX has a raw wood skin highlighted by 12 lines of LED light as many generative and constructive project’s lines. Merging organic materials with new technologies, this hybrid architectural artwork wraps around and embraces the footbridge between the complex’s two buildings, revealing and enhancing the venue’s dynamic energy while working as a live visualizer of energy consumption.VORTEX evolves like a living organism; it breathes, trembles and emits pulses of light created using 1024’s MadMapper software. Manually controlled via a joystick, the structure can be synchronized to music and also displays its location’s energy consumption through a series of illuminated tubes. It ultimately answers to the ambient environment around it, capturing the Darwin Ecosystem Project’s unique energy consumption footprint, and converting it into data that is processed to spawn realtime visuals.
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William Bondin

Morphs
MORPHs, short for Mobile Reconfigurable Polyhedra, are motive architectural structures which can crawl and self-assemble in order to encourage social interaction through play. These playful robotic creatures encourage the public to choreograph them into dance routines, assemble them into complex sculptural geometries or else play music at them, which they will play back over time. Groups of people can interact at any one time and eventually develop a dialogue amongst participants, through the use of contemporary digital technology.

KAZUHIRO KOJIMA

moon tensegrity membrane structure

This is an experimental housing complex that sought to regenerate the shops-cum-houses in an old area of Hanoi, Vietnam. This district, popularly known as “the 36th street district”, is composed primarily of houses inhabited by traditionally large Chinese families. The buildings have narrow frontages and an unusually extended depth of 70-80 m. These high-density, low-rise buildings were considered to be a comfortable domestic environment until the changes of government in Vietnam during the 20th century.
Han,” became such a high-density city (1,000 people per hectare} that many families began to live together within one unit and even to transform courtyards into actual rooms. As a result the standard of living deteriorated.

CHRYSSA VARNA

Industrial Improvisation

The project investigates how kinetic design and industrial robotics can embody the complexity of movement found in contemporary dance. Using structured improvisational techniques, a combination of pre-choreographed and improvised performances have been designed to form a gestural dialog between a dancer and two robotic performers. The result is an emerging set of movements that construct an unpredictable and evolving choreography.

DANIEL WHITE

Mandelbulb garden

The Mandelbulb is a 3-Dimensional representation of the boundary only – it is the surface of the object that is infinite. You don’t explore it by entering it, you simply ‘poke’ around the complex folds that make up the outer barrier. The more you poke around, the more stuff you find. That being said, Daniel White’s rendering of the object allowed for penetration of the structure revealing cross-sections of the bulb allowing us to look inside as well.

Undercurrent architects

Leaf House Sydney

Leaf House is building that allows users to be inside and in-the-garden at the same time. It is a self contained cottage forming part of a coastal residence in Sydney; a Pavilion for experiencing Nature. The building integrates the environment and reflects qualities of the landscape: its canopy structure blends into the foliage; its podium base shapes the terrain. The design is characterised by curved copper roof shells resembling fallen leaves and a vine-like structural system channelling dynamic growth inside. Daylight filters through porous roof shells onto a podium deck and the open plan living areas. Views and reflections subtly modulate the surrounding garden through an enclosure of moulded glass. Private spaces offer introspection inside the sandstone podium buried in the terrain. The project entailed design and building roles as methods were improvised to achieve high technical complexity within cost constraints.