Ricardo Barreto and Raquel Fukuda

Chess Auto-Creative
‘Chess Auto-Creative (CHEAC)’, takes the form of a cube where each face corresponds to an 8 x 8 chessboard. The six chessboards can also be arranged in a line to make them easier to see. There are 16 white pieces and 16 black pieces on each of the chessboards, made up of elements such as: kings, queens, bishops, knights, castles and pawns, each of which moves according to the rules of the game. However, instead of the pieces being arranged as normal, they are first set out in patterns where each element is repeated […]Each time a piece is moved to a new position, symmetrically or asymmetrically, a new variation of protochess is produced – in other words, a new game emerges. All games generated in this way are, in principle, variations of proto-chess – including the official chess game itself. This means that ‘Chess Auto-Creative’ is not a variant of the official chess game, but its origin.

FILE SAO PAULO 2019

Andrea YOAS

Inter – Lock
These units were then arranged on the site and divided into housing spaces as well as circulation and public spaces on the ground floors. The way that the original spatial units interlocked creates outdoor spaces that wrap into the mass of the building, allowing for the circulation of light and air deep into interior spaces.

Daniel Firman

ДЭНИЕЛ ФИРМАН
丹尼尔·菲尔曼
دانيال فيرمان

French-born artist Daniel Firman was born in 1966. He currently works and resides in Paris. His life-sized body cast plaster sculptures are particularly fascinating. In most cases, they are arranged in odd formations–balancing off of each other, crawling backwards or sideways–and on various suspensions–either up in the air or flopping over metal bars.

Random International

Fragments

Almost two hundred identical, small mirrors are arranged in a grid to form a flat, homogenous surface. Hung against the wall, the mirrors are closely spaced and apparently static; but they possess the ability to move in harmony with one another. Approaching the artwork, the individual mirrors turn together to face the onlooker, following as he or she moves. The plane of the surface distorts into varying, three-dimensional forms — perhaps a wave, or a curve, or a circle. The reflection becomes fragmented and the apparently inanimate object becomes akin to something organic and alive

Ludmila Rodrigues

Polytope
“Polytope” is a lightweight, tractable structure that engages the visitor in a space-bodily investigation. It is rigid and at the same time, tractable. A void which takes space. Its volume is juxtaposed and re-arranged through the action of the visitor.

FILE FESTIVAL

Maxim Zhestkov

Elements
Elements is an experimental art film by Maxim Zhestkov about nature, physics, art and love. More than 2 billion elements / particles governed by tensions and forces of nature were used to tell stories and show emotions through the motion of collective behavior.
The film is a trial to explore the idea that everything around us and inside us is made from simple elements / blocks which can be arranged in complex relationships and become compound structures. We could project this idea into emotions, behaviours, thought processes, relationships, life, planets and the universe.

Carl Kleiner

Карлом Кляйнером
Tulips Postures
Carl Kleiner creates sleek editorial content for fashion and lifestyle brands, and that sensibility shows in his photo and video series Postures which features artfully arranged tulips. Using minimal metal rods, bent at strategic ends and angles, Kleiner showcases the graceful curves of the flowers’ long necks and gently ruffled petals and leaves. A further sense of movement is instilled through the stop-motion video, which combines still photos of the blossoms’ subtle changes into a dramatic dance.

Dan Flavin

Untitled (to Barnett Newman) two
Dan Flavin was an American artist and pioneer of Minimalism, best known for his seminal installations of light fixtures. His illuminated sculptures offer a rigorous formal and conceptual investigation of space and light, wherein the artist arranged commercial fluorescent bulbs into differing geometric compositions. “I like art as thought better than art as work,” he once said. “I’ve always maintained this. It’s important to me that I don’t get my hands dirty. It’s not because I’m instinctively lazy. It’s a declaration: art is thought.”

Tokujin Yoshioka

吉冈德仁
吉岡徳仁
transparent mannequins

Considered ‘grid bodies’, or the ‘transparent body installation’ yoshioka has specially conceived these figures to highlight issey miyake’s garments. in room A, one finds the 1970s collections of miyake dressing figures composed out of 365 laser cut cardboard parts, arranged as a grid structure to create a futuristic human body. they are adorned by pieces that investigate miyake’s constant innovation in fabric-making, and his deep respect for tradition.

Frank Gehry

Luma Arles Tower
Atelier Vincent Hecht’s photos reveal the distinctive facade of the Luma Arles tower, which is finished with 11,000 aluminium panels irregularly arranged around its concrete and steel frame. Described by architecture critic Frank Miller as a “stainless-steel tornado”, the cladding was designed by Gehry to evoke the craggy limestone cliffs around the city for which it is known.

Strijbos & Van Rijswijk

whispers
Blue lightening discs seem to hang freely in a darkened space. They’re the horns of five more than man-sized ceramic trumpets, arranged in various directions. The white inside is radiated with blacklight, as it turns out when your eyes have adapted to the darkness. The horns transmit words, fragments of sentences, laughter, alternated with noise and a strange crackles and sputters. Each trumpet has it’s own repertory of expressions, of which the meaning is hard to probe. And each has it’s own characteristic sound, due to their difference in length.

Christoph De Boeck

Black Box
‘Black Box’ presents a black wooden volume that is suspended in the exhibition space. The base of the object shows a hollow in the shape of a skull. When the visitor enters this cavity with his head, the status of the object switches into that of an interface. This device contains eight transducers which transfer spatialized audio onto the skull when in contact. The audio is invasive: the acoustic environment is rearranged across the limited space of one’s head in such a way that after a while nothing lasts but two milliseconds of the original realtime sample. What is left is a click that will hop across the inner side of your skull.

Daan Brinkmann & Nenad Popov

Cellwise
Cellwise is a generative projection specifically designed for the city hall of The Hague. During the festival the city hall becomes the new habitat of a kind of ‘visual lifeform’. From the façade’s neatly arranged grid of white tiles, structures of a more entropic nature emerge. Shapes start growing, bursting, dripping, crawling and creeping. Cellwise is exploring the city hall’s sterile architecture, while at the same time challenging it to look for its visual counterpoints.

studio Kimchi and Chips – Elliot Woods and Mimi Son

483 Lines
The artwork 483 lines magnifies this analogue video picture until it is 16 meters wide, and then folds this image several times so that it fits vertically into the gallery space, therein adding oscillations of depth into the image which can be activated by ‘tuning’ the projected video to match these waves. The strictly arranged lines can be illusionary, creating a confusing architecture of horizons, whilst the video played through it displays a parallel past, present and future.